Limits...
Effects of Shift Work on Cognitive Performance, Sleep Quality, and Sleepiness among Petrochemical Control Room Operators.

Kazemi R, Haidarimoghadam R, Motamedzadeh M, Golmohamadi R, Soltanian A, Zoghipaydar MR - J Circadian Rhythms (2016)

Bottom Line: Shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance.All variables related to cognitive performance, except for omission error, significantly decreased at the end of both day and night shifts (p < 0.0001).It, thus, seems necessary to take ergonomic measures such as planning for more appropriate shift work and reducing working hours.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Phd student of occupational health, occupational health department, school of heath, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive performance, sleepiness, and sleep quality among petrochemical control room shift workers. Sixty shift workers participated in this study. Cognitive performance was evaluated using a number of objective tests, including continuous performance test, n-back test, and simple reaction time test; sleepiness was measured using the subjective Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS); and sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. ANCOVA, t-test, and repeated-measures ANOVA were applied for statistical analyses, and the significance level was set at p < 0.05. All variables related to cognitive performance, except for omission error, significantly decreased at the end of both day and night shifts (p < 0.0001). There were also significant differences between the day and night shifts in terms of the variables of omission error (p < 0.027) and commission error (p < 0.036). A significant difference was also observed between daily and nightly trends of sleepiness (p < 0.0001) so that sleepiness was higher for the night shift. Participants had low sleep quality on both day and night shifts, and there were significant differences between the day and night shifts in terms of subjective sleep quality and quantity (p < 0.01). Long working hours per shift result in fatigue, irregularities in the circadian rhythm and the cycle of sleep, induced cognitive performance decline at the end of both day and night shifts, and increased sleepiness in night shift. It, thus, seems necessary to take ergonomic measures such as planning for more appropriate shift work and reducing working hours.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trend of sleepiness in day-shift and night-shift workers over seven consecutive segments of the work shift.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834749&req=5

Figure 1: Trend of sleepiness in day-shift and night-shift workers over seven consecutive segments of the work shift.

Mentions: The results of paired sample t-test (Table 1) showed that, except for the omission error among night shift participants, a significant difference was observed in all the other variables between before and after night shift measurements. In addition, except in the case of omission error and CPT response time, the changes of all variables were statistically different before and after day shift. Moreover, the results obtained from ANCOVA (Table 2) indicated that there was a significant difference between the two shifts in change of omission and commission errors before and after each shift (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, the changes in N-back score, N- back response time, CPT response time, and Reaction time were not statistically different between the two shifts (P > 0.0.5). As illustrated in Table 3, there was a significant trend in sleepiness among different measures in the two shifts (P < 0.001). The sleepiness trend in the night shift was increasing, while it was decreasing in the day shift. Moreover, save for the third measurement (23:00/11:00), all measures were different between subjects of the two shifts (P < 0.001). In addition to the overall trend of sleepiness, the Greenhouse-Geisser test showed a significant difference between the trend of two shifts. Figure 1 demonstrates the line trend based on the two shifts. Figure 1 shows an inverse trend of sleepiness in the two shifts, with a crosspoint in the third measurement.


Effects of Shift Work on Cognitive Performance, Sleep Quality, and Sleepiness among Petrochemical Control Room Operators.

Kazemi R, Haidarimoghadam R, Motamedzadeh M, Golmohamadi R, Soltanian A, Zoghipaydar MR - J Circadian Rhythms (2016)

Trend of sleepiness in day-shift and night-shift workers over seven consecutive segments of the work shift.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834749&req=5

Figure 1: Trend of sleepiness in day-shift and night-shift workers over seven consecutive segments of the work shift.
Mentions: The results of paired sample t-test (Table 1) showed that, except for the omission error among night shift participants, a significant difference was observed in all the other variables between before and after night shift measurements. In addition, except in the case of omission error and CPT response time, the changes of all variables were statistically different before and after day shift. Moreover, the results obtained from ANCOVA (Table 2) indicated that there was a significant difference between the two shifts in change of omission and commission errors before and after each shift (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, the changes in N-back score, N- back response time, CPT response time, and Reaction time were not statistically different between the two shifts (P > 0.0.5). As illustrated in Table 3, there was a significant trend in sleepiness among different measures in the two shifts (P < 0.001). The sleepiness trend in the night shift was increasing, while it was decreasing in the day shift. Moreover, save for the third measurement (23:00/11:00), all measures were different between subjects of the two shifts (P < 0.001). In addition to the overall trend of sleepiness, the Greenhouse-Geisser test showed a significant difference between the trend of two shifts. Figure 1 demonstrates the line trend based on the two shifts. Figure 1 shows an inverse trend of sleepiness in the two shifts, with a crosspoint in the third measurement.

Bottom Line: Shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance.All variables related to cognitive performance, except for omission error, significantly decreased at the end of both day and night shifts (p < 0.0001).It, thus, seems necessary to take ergonomic measures such as planning for more appropriate shift work and reducing working hours.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Phd student of occupational health, occupational health department, school of heath, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.

ABSTRACT
Shift work is associated with both sleepiness and reduced performance. The aim of this study was to examine cognitive performance, sleepiness, and sleep quality among petrochemical control room shift workers. Sixty shift workers participated in this study. Cognitive performance was evaluated using a number of objective tests, including continuous performance test, n-back test, and simple reaction time test; sleepiness was measured using the subjective Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS); and sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. ANCOVA, t-test, and repeated-measures ANOVA were applied for statistical analyses, and the significance level was set at p < 0.05. All variables related to cognitive performance, except for omission error, significantly decreased at the end of both day and night shifts (p < 0.0001). There were also significant differences between the day and night shifts in terms of the variables of omission error (p < 0.027) and commission error (p < 0.036). A significant difference was also observed between daily and nightly trends of sleepiness (p < 0.0001) so that sleepiness was higher for the night shift. Participants had low sleep quality on both day and night shifts, and there were significant differences between the day and night shifts in terms of subjective sleep quality and quantity (p < 0.01). Long working hours per shift result in fatigue, irregularities in the circadian rhythm and the cycle of sleep, induced cognitive performance decline at the end of both day and night shifts, and increased sleepiness in night shift. It, thus, seems necessary to take ergonomic measures such as planning for more appropriate shift work and reducing working hours.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus