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Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice.

Covey JP, Moses SA, Gärttner M, Safavi-Naini A, Miecnikowski MT, Fu Z, Schachenmayer J, Julienne PS, Rey AM, Jin DS, Ye J - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair.Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons.These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA.

ABSTRACT
Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Measuring the initial atomic distributions with spin-changing collisions.(a,b) Sample data for low and high Rb number, respectively. The fraction of Rb remaining after the fast loss is different between the two cases. (c) The fraction of Rb lost after ∼8 ms is plotted as a function of the Rb number in a 25ER lattice. The blue diamonds correspond to the data shown in panels (a,b). At low Rb number, where the Mott insulator has one Rb atom per site, the fraction lost should be equal to the fraction of sites that have a K atom. As the Rb filling increases and the second Mott shell becomes populated, the fraction lost decreases. This technique yields both the filling of K and a measure of Rb atom number that corresponds to the onset of double occupancy of the Rb Mott insulator. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.
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f5: Measuring the initial atomic distributions with spin-changing collisions.(a,b) Sample data for low and high Rb number, respectively. The fraction of Rb remaining after the fast loss is different between the two cases. (c) The fraction of Rb lost after ∼8 ms is plotted as a function of the Rb number in a 25ER lattice. The blue diamonds correspond to the data shown in panels (a,b). At low Rb number, where the Mott insulator has one Rb atom per site, the fraction lost should be equal to the fraction of sites that have a K atom. As the Rb filling increases and the second Mott shell becomes populated, the fraction lost decreases. This technique yields both the filling of K and a measure of Rb atom number that corresponds to the onset of double occupancy of the Rb Mott insulator. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.

Mentions: In Fig. 5a,b, we show example data for the number of Rb atoms as a function of time after a 2.1-ms rf sweep that transfers Rb atoms to the state. We observe a fast loss on the time scale of a few ms, followed by slower loss. We attribute the fast loss to inelastic collisions of Rb atoms in lattice sites shared with K, and the slow loss to tunnelling of atoms followed by inelastic collisions. The dashed lines in Fig. 5a,b show a fit to the sum of two exponential decays with different time constants. We can extract the fraction of Rb that is lost on the short timescale from the fits. We compared this technique with Feshbach molecule formation, and found that the two measurements generally agree.


Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice.

Covey JP, Moses SA, Gärttner M, Safavi-Naini A, Miecnikowski MT, Fu Z, Schachenmayer J, Julienne PS, Rey AM, Jin DS, Ye J - Nat Commun (2016)

Measuring the initial atomic distributions with spin-changing collisions.(a,b) Sample data for low and high Rb number, respectively. The fraction of Rb remaining after the fast loss is different between the two cases. (c) The fraction of Rb lost after ∼8 ms is plotted as a function of the Rb number in a 25ER lattice. The blue diamonds correspond to the data shown in panels (a,b). At low Rb number, where the Mott insulator has one Rb atom per site, the fraction lost should be equal to the fraction of sites that have a K atom. As the Rb filling increases and the second Mott shell becomes populated, the fraction lost decreases. This technique yields both the filling of K and a measure of Rb atom number that corresponds to the onset of double occupancy of the Rb Mott insulator. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834636&req=5

f5: Measuring the initial atomic distributions with spin-changing collisions.(a,b) Sample data for low and high Rb number, respectively. The fraction of Rb remaining after the fast loss is different between the two cases. (c) The fraction of Rb lost after ∼8 ms is plotted as a function of the Rb number in a 25ER lattice. The blue diamonds correspond to the data shown in panels (a,b). At low Rb number, where the Mott insulator has one Rb atom per site, the fraction lost should be equal to the fraction of sites that have a K atom. As the Rb filling increases and the second Mott shell becomes populated, the fraction lost decreases. This technique yields both the filling of K and a measure of Rb atom number that corresponds to the onset of double occupancy of the Rb Mott insulator. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.
Mentions: In Fig. 5a,b, we show example data for the number of Rb atoms as a function of time after a 2.1-ms rf sweep that transfers Rb atoms to the state. We observe a fast loss on the time scale of a few ms, followed by slower loss. We attribute the fast loss to inelastic collisions of Rb atoms in lattice sites shared with K, and the slow loss to tunnelling of atoms followed by inelastic collisions. The dashed lines in Fig. 5a,b show a fit to the sum of two exponential decays with different time constants. We can extract the fraction of Rb that is lost on the short timescale from the fits. We compared this technique with Feshbach molecule formation, and found that the two measurements generally agree.

Bottom Line: Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair.Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons.These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA.

ABSTRACT
Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus