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Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice.

Covey JP, Moses SA, Gärttner M, Safavi-Naini A, Miecnikowski MT, Fu Z, Schachenmayer J, Julienne PS, Rey AM, Jin DS, Ye J - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair.Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons.These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA.

ABSTRACT
Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interaction and tunnelling dynamics of doublons in the lattice.(a) The remaining doublon fraction is shown for three scattering lengths as a function of the lattice depth. (b) The doublon fraction is plotted for three lattice depths as a function of the scattering length. (c) The doublon fraction for 1.68 mT ms−1 sweeps,  and aK-Rb=−220a0 is shown as a function of the lattice depth for the case of higher excited-band fraction (squares) and lower excited-band fraction (circles). (d) Band-mapping images of the initial K gas are shown for the two different initial temperatures, where image i corresponds to the red circle data points and ii corresponds to the green square data points in (c). Each image is the average of three measurements. The colour bar indicates the optical depth (OD). Below the images, we display the OD for a horizontal trace through the image, with averaging from −ħk to +ħk in the vertical direction. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.
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f3: Interaction and tunnelling dynamics of doublons in the lattice.(a) The remaining doublon fraction is shown for three scattering lengths as a function of the lattice depth. (b) The doublon fraction is plotted for three lattice depths as a function of the scattering length. (c) The doublon fraction for 1.68 mT ms−1 sweeps, and aK-Rb=−220a0 is shown as a function of the lattice depth for the case of higher excited-band fraction (squares) and lower excited-band fraction (circles). (d) Band-mapping images of the initial K gas are shown for the two different initial temperatures, where image i corresponds to the red circle data points and ii corresponds to the green square data points in (c). Each image is the average of three measurements. The colour bar indicates the optical depth (OD). Below the images, we display the OD for a horizontal trace through the image, with averaging from −ħk to +ħk in the vertical direction. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.

Mentions: Figure 3 illustrates doublon dynamics due to the interplay between tunnelling and interactions, which we control by varying the lattice depth, interspecies scattering length aK-Rb and band population. The fraction of doublons that remain after is essentially equal to the measured molecule conversion efficiency described above. We note that for aK-Rb>−850a0, the B sweep crosses the d-wave Feshbach resonance with a that varies from 0.5 to 1.9 mT ms−1. Using our measured width of the d-wave resonance, the data presented in Fig. 3 have been multiplied by a factor that increases the doublon fraction to account for the finite when crossing the d-wave resonance. Figure 3a shows the effect of the lattice depth for at three different values of Bhold, corresponding to different values of aK-Rb. This timescale is relevant for both molecule production and K tunnelling dynamics. We observe that the remaining doublon fraction is highly sensitive to the lattice depth for weak interspecies interactions, for example, aK-Rb=−220a0, with a lower doublon fraction for shallower lattices that exhibit higher tunnelling rates. For stronger interactions, the dependence on lattice depth becomes less significant and almost disappears in the strongly interacting regime, for example, aK-Rb=−1,900a0. Similar behaviour is observed if we fix the lattice depth but vary the interspecies interactions, as shown in Fig. 3b.


Doublon dynamics and polar molecule production in an optical lattice.

Covey JP, Moses SA, Gärttner M, Safavi-Naini A, Miecnikowski MT, Fu Z, Schachenmayer J, Julienne PS, Rey AM, Jin DS, Ye J - Nat Commun (2016)

Interaction and tunnelling dynamics of doublons in the lattice.(a) The remaining doublon fraction is shown for three scattering lengths as a function of the lattice depth. (b) The doublon fraction is plotted for three lattice depths as a function of the scattering length. (c) The doublon fraction for 1.68 mT ms−1 sweeps,  and aK-Rb=−220a0 is shown as a function of the lattice depth for the case of higher excited-band fraction (squares) and lower excited-band fraction (circles). (d) Band-mapping images of the initial K gas are shown for the two different initial temperatures, where image i corresponds to the red circle data points and ii corresponds to the green square data points in (c). Each image is the average of three measurements. The colour bar indicates the optical depth (OD). Below the images, we display the OD for a horizontal trace through the image, with averaging from −ħk to +ħk in the vertical direction. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834636&req=5

f3: Interaction and tunnelling dynamics of doublons in the lattice.(a) The remaining doublon fraction is shown for three scattering lengths as a function of the lattice depth. (b) The doublon fraction is plotted for three lattice depths as a function of the scattering length. (c) The doublon fraction for 1.68 mT ms−1 sweeps, and aK-Rb=−220a0 is shown as a function of the lattice depth for the case of higher excited-band fraction (squares) and lower excited-band fraction (circles). (d) Band-mapping images of the initial K gas are shown for the two different initial temperatures, where image i corresponds to the red circle data points and ii corresponds to the green square data points in (c). Each image is the average of three measurements. The colour bar indicates the optical depth (OD). Below the images, we display the OD for a horizontal trace through the image, with averaging from −ħk to +ħk in the vertical direction. All error bars represent 1−σ standard error.
Mentions: Figure 3 illustrates doublon dynamics due to the interplay between tunnelling and interactions, which we control by varying the lattice depth, interspecies scattering length aK-Rb and band population. The fraction of doublons that remain after is essentially equal to the measured molecule conversion efficiency described above. We note that for aK-Rb>−850a0, the B sweep crosses the d-wave Feshbach resonance with a that varies from 0.5 to 1.9 mT ms−1. Using our measured width of the d-wave resonance, the data presented in Fig. 3 have been multiplied by a factor that increases the doublon fraction to account for the finite when crossing the d-wave resonance. Figure 3a shows the effect of the lattice depth for at three different values of Bhold, corresponding to different values of aK-Rb. This timescale is relevant for both molecule production and K tunnelling dynamics. We observe that the remaining doublon fraction is highly sensitive to the lattice depth for weak interspecies interactions, for example, aK-Rb=−220a0, with a lower doublon fraction for shallower lattices that exhibit higher tunnelling rates. For stronger interactions, the dependence on lattice depth becomes less significant and almost disappears in the strongly interacting regime, for example, aK-Rb=−1,900a0. Similar behaviour is observed if we fix the lattice depth but vary the interspecies interactions, as shown in Fig. 3b.

Bottom Line: Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair.Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons.These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: JILA, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA.

ABSTRACT
Polar molecules in an optical lattice provide a versatile platform to study quantum many-body dynamics. Here we use such a system to prepare a density distribution where lattice sites are either empty or occupied by a doublon composed of an interacting Bose-Fermi pair. By letting this out-of-equilibrium system evolve from a well-defined, but disordered, initial condition, we observe clear effects on pairing that arise from inter-species interactions, a higher partial-wave Feshbach resonance and excited Bloch-band population. These observations facilitate a detailed understanding of molecule formation in the lattice. Moreover, the interplay of tunnelling and interaction of fermions and bosons provides a controllable platform to study Bose-Fermi Hubbard dynamics. Additionally, we can probe the distribution of the atomic gases in the lattice by measuring the inelastic loss of doublons. These techniques realize tools that are generically applicable to studying the complex dynamics of atomic mixtures in optical lattices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus