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Estimation of a general time-dependent Hamiltonian for a single qubit.

de Clercq LE, Oswald R, Flühmann C, Keitch B, Kienzler D, Lo HY, Marinelli M, Nadlinger D, Negnevitsky V, Home JP - Nat Commun (2016)

Bottom Line: The initially unknown Hamiltonian arises from transporting an ion through a static laser beam.Hamiltonian estimation allows us to estimate the spatial beam intensity profile and the ion velocity as a function of time.The estimation technique is general enough that it can be applied to other quantum systems, aiding the pursuit of high-operational fidelities in quantum control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zürich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
The Hamiltonian of a closed quantum system governs its complete time evolution. While Hamiltonians with time-variation in a single basis can be recovered using a variety of methods, for more general Hamiltonians the presence of non-commuting terms complicates the reconstruction. Here using a single trapped ion, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a method for estimating a time-dependent Hamiltonian of a single qubit. We measure the time evolution of the qubit in a fixed basis as a function of a time-independent offset term added to the Hamiltonian. The initially unknown Hamiltonian arises from transporting an ion through a static laser beam. Hamiltonian estimation allows us to estimate the spatial beam intensity profile and the ion velocity as a function of time. The estimation technique is general enough that it can be applied to other quantum systems, aiding the pursuit of high-operational fidelities in quantum control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Beam and ion transport.The beam propagation direction lies along the ξ-axis and the ion is transported along the z-axis lying on the κξ-plane as indicated. Normalized vectors representing el(κ, ξ) lying perpendicular to the wavefronts are indicated by the blue arrows.
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f6: Beam and ion transport.The beam propagation direction lies along the ξ-axis and the ion is transported along the z-axis lying on the κξ-plane as indicated. Normalized vectors representing el(κ, ξ) lying perpendicular to the wavefronts are indicated by the blue arrows.

Mentions: where θ′(z(t))=dθ(z(t))/dz(t). We parameterize our Gaussian beam according to Fig. 6. The phase is given as a function of both the position along the beam axis ξ and the perpendicular distance from this axis κ by32


Estimation of a general time-dependent Hamiltonian for a single qubit.

de Clercq LE, Oswald R, Flühmann C, Keitch B, Kienzler D, Lo HY, Marinelli M, Nadlinger D, Negnevitsky V, Home JP - Nat Commun (2016)

Beam and ion transport.The beam propagation direction lies along the ξ-axis and the ion is transported along the z-axis lying on the κξ-plane as indicated. Normalized vectors representing el(κ, ξ) lying perpendicular to the wavefronts are indicated by the blue arrows.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834628&req=5

f6: Beam and ion transport.The beam propagation direction lies along the ξ-axis and the ion is transported along the z-axis lying on the κξ-plane as indicated. Normalized vectors representing el(κ, ξ) lying perpendicular to the wavefronts are indicated by the blue arrows.
Mentions: where θ′(z(t))=dθ(z(t))/dz(t). We parameterize our Gaussian beam according to Fig. 6. The phase is given as a function of both the position along the beam axis ξ and the perpendicular distance from this axis κ by32

Bottom Line: The initially unknown Hamiltonian arises from transporting an ion through a static laser beam.Hamiltonian estimation allows us to estimate the spatial beam intensity profile and the ion velocity as a function of time.The estimation technique is general enough that it can be applied to other quantum systems, aiding the pursuit of high-operational fidelities in quantum control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Quantum Electronics, ETH Zürich, Otto-Stern-Weg 1, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
The Hamiltonian of a closed quantum system governs its complete time evolution. While Hamiltonians with time-variation in a single basis can be recovered using a variety of methods, for more general Hamiltonians the presence of non-commuting terms complicates the reconstruction. Here using a single trapped ion, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a method for estimating a time-dependent Hamiltonian of a single qubit. We measure the time evolution of the qubit in a fixed basis as a function of a time-independent offset term added to the Hamiltonian. The initially unknown Hamiltonian arises from transporting an ion through a static laser beam. Hamiltonian estimation allows us to estimate the spatial beam intensity profile and the ion velocity as a function of time. The estimation technique is general enough that it can be applied to other quantum systems, aiding the pursuit of high-operational fidelities in quantum control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus