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Machine-Assisted Organic Synthesis.

Ley SV, Fitzpatrick DE, Myers RM, Battilocchio C, Ingham RJ - Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. (2015)

Bottom Line: In this Review we describe how the advent of machines is impacting on organic synthesis programs, with particular emphasis on the practical issues associated with the design of chemical reactors.Additional technologies have been developed to facilitate more specialized reaction techniques such as electrochemical and photochemical methods.All of these areas create both opportunities and challenges during adoption as enabling technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW (UK). svl1000@cam.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The topic of machine‐assisted organic synthesis has been divided into eight sections in this Review.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: The topic of machine‐assisted organic synthesis has been divided into eight sections in this Review.

Mentions: Previous articles of this type tend to emphasize outputs, while here we concentrate more on the practical issues, especially those encountered during the development of flow reactors and of continuous processing technologies and their related equipment (Figure 1). We specifically highlight the special machine requirements imposed by handling supercritical fluids and the safe use of other reactive gases. Also of concern is the ability to have equipment that can operate over extremes of temperature and pressure. Increasingly too, the use of enzymes in reactor systems is becoming more general to expand the repertoire of synthetic chemists. Issues relating to slurries, organometallic compounds, and other hazardous or air‐sensitive materials require machine development, although more and more devices are coming onto the market. We are also seeing a resurgence of interest in electro‐ and photochemical processing methods, which lead in turn to innovation in reactor design. Each of these areas presents its own challenges and problems which, as described herein, have been solved through the use of pioneering machinery.


Machine-Assisted Organic Synthesis.

Ley SV, Fitzpatrick DE, Myers RM, Battilocchio C, Ingham RJ - Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. (2015)

The topic of machine‐assisted organic synthesis has been divided into eight sections in this Review.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834626&req=5

fig1: The topic of machine‐assisted organic synthesis has been divided into eight sections in this Review.
Mentions: Previous articles of this type tend to emphasize outputs, while here we concentrate more on the practical issues, especially those encountered during the development of flow reactors and of continuous processing technologies and their related equipment (Figure 1). We specifically highlight the special machine requirements imposed by handling supercritical fluids and the safe use of other reactive gases. Also of concern is the ability to have equipment that can operate over extremes of temperature and pressure. Increasingly too, the use of enzymes in reactor systems is becoming more general to expand the repertoire of synthetic chemists. Issues relating to slurries, organometallic compounds, and other hazardous or air‐sensitive materials require machine development, although more and more devices are coming onto the market. We are also seeing a resurgence of interest in electro‐ and photochemical processing methods, which lead in turn to innovation in reactor design. Each of these areas presents its own challenges and problems which, as described herein, have been solved through the use of pioneering machinery.

Bottom Line: In this Review we describe how the advent of machines is impacting on organic synthesis programs, with particular emphasis on the practical issues associated with the design of chemical reactors.Additional technologies have been developed to facilitate more specialized reaction techniques such as electrochemical and photochemical methods.All of these areas create both opportunities and challenges during adoption as enabling technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge, CB2 1EW (UK). svl1000@cam.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus