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Commercially available alternatives to palm oil.

Hinrichsen N - Lipid Technol (2016)

Bottom Line: Since several years there has been a demand for food products free of palm oil, noticeable in the Western European market.This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of those products and compares them to similar products based on palm oil.It is also discussed how reasonable the replacement of palm products would be, since sustainable and 3-MCPD/glycidolester-reduced palm based specialty oils are also available on the market.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ADM Research GmbH Hamburg Germany.

ABSTRACT

Since several years there has been a demand for food products free of palm oil, noticeable in the Western European market. Alternatives based on liquid oils, fully hydrogenated fats, and exotic fats like shea and sal etc., have been developed by the research groups of several specialty oils and fats suppliers. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of those products and compares them to similar products based on palm oil. It is also discussed how reasonable the replacement of palm products would be, since sustainable and 3-MCPD/glycidolester-reduced palm based specialty oils are also available on the market.

No MeSH data available.


Changes of trans‐ and saturated fatty acid level in the hydrogenation process of a soybean oil.
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lite201600018-fig-0001: Changes of trans‐ and saturated fatty acid level in the hydrogenation process of a soybean oil.

Mentions: Even though partially hydrogenated fats are not an option to replace palm oil in food applications, a fully hydrogenated fat could potentially be utilised. The level of trans‐fatty acids changes during the hydrogenation process (Figure1) and at full hydrogenation (almost all double bonds saturated) a fat does not contain either unsaturated fatty acids or trans‐fatty acids in any significant quantity. The issue with fully hydrogenated fats (except for lauric fats, C12 and C14) is their high melting point (typically >50°C), this results in a high “solid fat content” at body temperature and therefore an unpleasant sensory experience. To achieve a melting profile that is appropriate for most food applications (almost liquid at body temperature plus functionality at lower temperatures), a fully hydrogenated oil can be blended and interesterified with various non‐hydrogenated oils to produce a functional and organoleptically acceptable end‐product.


Commercially available alternatives to palm oil.

Hinrichsen N - Lipid Technol (2016)

Changes of trans‐ and saturated fatty acid level in the hydrogenation process of a soybean oil.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834613&req=5

lite201600018-fig-0001: Changes of trans‐ and saturated fatty acid level in the hydrogenation process of a soybean oil.
Mentions: Even though partially hydrogenated fats are not an option to replace palm oil in food applications, a fully hydrogenated fat could potentially be utilised. The level of trans‐fatty acids changes during the hydrogenation process (Figure1) and at full hydrogenation (almost all double bonds saturated) a fat does not contain either unsaturated fatty acids or trans‐fatty acids in any significant quantity. The issue with fully hydrogenated fats (except for lauric fats, C12 and C14) is their high melting point (typically >50°C), this results in a high “solid fat content” at body temperature and therefore an unpleasant sensory experience. To achieve a melting profile that is appropriate for most food applications (almost liquid at body temperature plus functionality at lower temperatures), a fully hydrogenated oil can be blended and interesterified with various non‐hydrogenated oils to produce a functional and organoleptically acceptable end‐product.

Bottom Line: Since several years there has been a demand for food products free of palm oil, noticeable in the Western European market.This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of those products and compares them to similar products based on palm oil.It is also discussed how reasonable the replacement of palm products would be, since sustainable and 3-MCPD/glycidolester-reduced palm based specialty oils are also available on the market.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ADM Research GmbH Hamburg Germany.

ABSTRACT

Since several years there has been a demand for food products free of palm oil, noticeable in the Western European market. Alternatives based on liquid oils, fully hydrogenated fats, and exotic fats like shea and sal etc., have been developed by the research groups of several specialty oils and fats suppliers. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages of those products and compares them to similar products based on palm oil. It is also discussed how reasonable the replacement of palm products would be, since sustainable and 3-MCPD/glycidolester-reduced palm based specialty oils are also available on the market.

No MeSH data available.