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Mutation of OsGIGANTEA Leads to Enhanced Tolerance to Polyethylene Glycol-Generated Osmotic Stress in Rice.

Li S, Yue W, Wang M, Qiu W, Zhou L, Shou H - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice.Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement.In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang UniversityHangzhou, China; College of Life Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural UniversityQingdao, China.

ABSTRACT
Water deficit is one of the most important environmental stresses limiting plant growth and crop yield. While the identification of many key factors involved in the plant water deficit response has greatly increased our knowledge about the regulation system, the mechanisms underlying dehydration tolerance in plants are still not well understood. In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice. Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement. In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth characteristics of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants under PEG-treated conditions. (A) 15-day-old WT, L1, L2 and osgi seedlings (left) were treated in 21% PEG-conditioned culture media for 3 days (right). (B) Absolute fresh weight or (C) fresh weight relative to the strain-matched control of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants grown in control or PEG-treated culture media. (D) Water contents in WT, L1, L2 and osgi leaves were measured 24, 48, and 72 h after PEG treatment. All data represent the mean of three biological replicates, with error bars indicating SD. Significant differences relative to the corresponding WT strain are indicated with asterisks (**P < 0.01; and *P < 0.05). Bars = 4 cm.
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Figure 3: Growth characteristics of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants under PEG-treated conditions. (A) 15-day-old WT, L1, L2 and osgi seedlings (left) were treated in 21% PEG-conditioned culture media for 3 days (right). (B) Absolute fresh weight or (C) fresh weight relative to the strain-matched control of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants grown in control or PEG-treated culture media. (D) Water contents in WT, L1, L2 and osgi leaves were measured 24, 48, and 72 h after PEG treatment. All data represent the mean of three biological replicates, with error bars indicating SD. Significant differences relative to the corresponding WT strain are indicated with asterisks (**P < 0.01; and *P < 0.05). Bars = 4 cm.

Mentions: OsGI has been reported to be a molecular switch connecting flowering time regulation with multiple stress-response pathways, such as oxidative and salinity stresses (Kurepa et al., 1998; Kim et al., 2013). To investigate whether GI influences the tolerance to osmotic stress, WT and osgi plants were grown for 15 days under normal growth condition and then treated with 21% PEG 8000 for 3 days. As shown in Figure 3A, osgi mutants displayed improved osmotic stress tolerance compared to WT. After 3 days of exposure to high concentrations of PEG, WT plants were completely wilted while osgi plants remained healthy. PEG treatment decreased the fresh weight of WT and osgi plants by 55 and 30%, respectively, compared to the corresponding plants grown under normal condition (Figures 3B,C). While the water content in both WT and osgi leaves decreased during PEG treatment, osgi plants maintained a significantly higher water content than WT (Figure 3D). However, osgi plants used for the analysis of resistance to drought in soil showed the same phenotype as WT (data not shown).


Mutation of OsGIGANTEA Leads to Enhanced Tolerance to Polyethylene Glycol-Generated Osmotic Stress in Rice.

Li S, Yue W, Wang M, Qiu W, Zhou L, Shou H - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Growth characteristics of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants under PEG-treated conditions. (A) 15-day-old WT, L1, L2 and osgi seedlings (left) were treated in 21% PEG-conditioned culture media for 3 days (right). (B) Absolute fresh weight or (C) fresh weight relative to the strain-matched control of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants grown in control or PEG-treated culture media. (D) Water contents in WT, L1, L2 and osgi leaves were measured 24, 48, and 72 h after PEG treatment. All data represent the mean of three biological replicates, with error bars indicating SD. Significant differences relative to the corresponding WT strain are indicated with asterisks (**P < 0.01; and *P < 0.05). Bars = 4 cm.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834575&req=5

Figure 3: Growth characteristics of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants under PEG-treated conditions. (A) 15-day-old WT, L1, L2 and osgi seedlings (left) were treated in 21% PEG-conditioned culture media for 3 days (right). (B) Absolute fresh weight or (C) fresh weight relative to the strain-matched control of WT, L1, L2 and osgi plants grown in control or PEG-treated culture media. (D) Water contents in WT, L1, L2 and osgi leaves were measured 24, 48, and 72 h after PEG treatment. All data represent the mean of three biological replicates, with error bars indicating SD. Significant differences relative to the corresponding WT strain are indicated with asterisks (**P < 0.01; and *P < 0.05). Bars = 4 cm.
Mentions: OsGI has been reported to be a molecular switch connecting flowering time regulation with multiple stress-response pathways, such as oxidative and salinity stresses (Kurepa et al., 1998; Kim et al., 2013). To investigate whether GI influences the tolerance to osmotic stress, WT and osgi plants were grown for 15 days under normal growth condition and then treated with 21% PEG 8000 for 3 days. As shown in Figure 3A, osgi mutants displayed improved osmotic stress tolerance compared to WT. After 3 days of exposure to high concentrations of PEG, WT plants were completely wilted while osgi plants remained healthy. PEG treatment decreased the fresh weight of WT and osgi plants by 55 and 30%, respectively, compared to the corresponding plants grown under normal condition (Figures 3B,C). While the water content in both WT and osgi leaves decreased during PEG treatment, osgi plants maintained a significantly higher water content than WT (Figure 3D). However, osgi plants used for the analysis of resistance to drought in soil showed the same phenotype as WT (data not shown).

Bottom Line: In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice.Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement.In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang UniversityHangzhou, China; College of Life Sciences, Qingdao Agricultural UniversityQingdao, China.

ABSTRACT
Water deficit is one of the most important environmental stresses limiting plant growth and crop yield. While the identification of many key factors involved in the plant water deficit response has greatly increased our knowledge about the regulation system, the mechanisms underlying dehydration tolerance in plants are still not well understood. In our current study, we investigated the roles of the key flowering time regulator, OsGIGANTEA (OsGI), in the osmotic stress tolerance in rice. Results showed that mutation of OsGI conferred tolerance to osmotic stress generated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), increased proline and sucrose contents, and accelerated stomata movement. In addition, qRT-PCR and microarray analysis revealed that the transcript abundance of some osmotic stress response genes, such as OsDREB1E, OsAP37, OsAP59, OsLIP9, OsLEA3, OsRAB16A, and OsSalT, was significantly higher in osgi than in WT plants, suggesting that OsGI might be a negative regulator in the osmotic stress response in rice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus