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The reproductive tracts of two malaria vectors are populated by a core microbiome and by gender- and swarm-enriched microbial biomarkers.

Segata N, Baldini F, Pompon J, Garrett WS, Truong DT, Dabiré RK, Diabaté A, Levashina EA, Catteruccia F - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Microbes play key roles in shaping the physiology of insects and can influence behavior, reproduction and susceptibility to pathogens.We analyzed the reproductive microbiomes of male and female An. gambiae and An. coluzzii couples collected from natural mating swarms in Burkina Faso. 16S rRNA sequencing on dissected tissues revealed that the reproductive tracts harbor a complex microbiome characterized by a large core group of bacteria shared by both species and all reproductive tissues.Interestingly, we detected a significant enrichment of several gender-associated microbial biomarkers in specific tissues, and surprisingly, similar classes of bacteria in males captured from one mating swarm, suggesting that these males originated from the same larval breeding site.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Integrative Biology, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Microbes play key roles in shaping the physiology of insects and can influence behavior, reproduction and susceptibility to pathogens. In Sub-Saharan Africa, two major malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae and An. coluzzii, breed in distinct larval habitats characterized by different microorganisms that might affect their adult physiology and possibly Plasmodium transmission. We analyzed the reproductive microbiomes of male and female An. gambiae and An. coluzzii couples collected from natural mating swarms in Burkina Faso. 16S rRNA sequencing on dissected tissues revealed that the reproductive tracts harbor a complex microbiome characterized by a large core group of bacteria shared by both species and all reproductive tissues. Interestingly, we detected a significant enrichment of several gender-associated microbial biomarkers in specific tissues, and surprisingly, similar classes of bacteria in males captured from one mating swarm, suggesting that these males originated from the same larval breeding site. Finally, we identified several endosymbiotic bacteria, including Spiroplasma, which have the ability to manipulate insect reproductive success. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the reproductive microbiome of important human disease vectors, and identifies a panel of core and endosymbiotic bacteria that can be potentially exploited to interfere with the transmission of malaria parasites by the Anopheles mosquito.

No MeSH data available.


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Microbial gender- and tissue-specific biomarkers identified for An. gambiae and An. coluzzi.(A) Hierarchical taxonomic plot of gender-specific microbial biomarkers (LEfSe)38 displayed using GraPhlAn63. (B) Hierarchical taxonomic plot highlighting tissue-specific biomarkers (four-class comparison).
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f4: Microbial gender- and tissue-specific biomarkers identified for An. gambiae and An. coluzzi.(A) Hierarchical taxonomic plot of gender-specific microbial biomarkers (LEfSe)38 displayed using GraPhlAn63. (B) Hierarchical taxonomic plot highlighting tissue-specific biomarkers (four-class comparison).

Mentions: While core bacteria were common to female and male reproductive organs, their quantitative distribution differed between genders. Acinetobacter (OTU 4482598 and several other OTUs) drove the sample clustering and were consistently more abundant in the female reproductive tract using the linear discriminant effect size tool, LEfSe38 (uncorrected p <  1e-5, Fig. 4A). In contrast, Enterobacteriaceae and Aerococcaceae OTUs were significantly higher in male reproductive tissues (p <  0.01). When expanding this analysis to non-core OTUs, LEfSe detected additional microbial biomarkers associated with female (Desemzia and Granulicatella) or male (Agrobacterium, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides, and Cloacibacterium) reproductive tissues (Fig. 4A).


The reproductive tracts of two malaria vectors are populated by a core microbiome and by gender- and swarm-enriched microbial biomarkers.

Segata N, Baldini F, Pompon J, Garrett WS, Truong DT, Dabiré RK, Diabaté A, Levashina EA, Catteruccia F - Sci Rep (2016)

Microbial gender- and tissue-specific biomarkers identified for An. gambiae and An. coluzzi.(A) Hierarchical taxonomic plot of gender-specific microbial biomarkers (LEfSe)38 displayed using GraPhlAn63. (B) Hierarchical taxonomic plot highlighting tissue-specific biomarkers (four-class comparison).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834568&req=5

f4: Microbial gender- and tissue-specific biomarkers identified for An. gambiae and An. coluzzi.(A) Hierarchical taxonomic plot of gender-specific microbial biomarkers (LEfSe)38 displayed using GraPhlAn63. (B) Hierarchical taxonomic plot highlighting tissue-specific biomarkers (four-class comparison).
Mentions: While core bacteria were common to female and male reproductive organs, their quantitative distribution differed between genders. Acinetobacter (OTU 4482598 and several other OTUs) drove the sample clustering and were consistently more abundant in the female reproductive tract using the linear discriminant effect size tool, LEfSe38 (uncorrected p <  1e-5, Fig. 4A). In contrast, Enterobacteriaceae and Aerococcaceae OTUs were significantly higher in male reproductive tissues (p <  0.01). When expanding this analysis to non-core OTUs, LEfSe detected additional microbial biomarkers associated with female (Desemzia and Granulicatella) or male (Agrobacterium, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides, and Cloacibacterium) reproductive tissues (Fig. 4A).

Bottom Line: Microbes play key roles in shaping the physiology of insects and can influence behavior, reproduction and susceptibility to pathogens.We analyzed the reproductive microbiomes of male and female An. gambiae and An. coluzzii couples collected from natural mating swarms in Burkina Faso. 16S rRNA sequencing on dissected tissues revealed that the reproductive tracts harbor a complex microbiome characterized by a large core group of bacteria shared by both species and all reproductive tissues.Interestingly, we detected a significant enrichment of several gender-associated microbial biomarkers in specific tissues, and surprisingly, similar classes of bacteria in males captured from one mating swarm, suggesting that these males originated from the same larval breeding site.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Integrative Biology, University of Trento, Trento, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Microbes play key roles in shaping the physiology of insects and can influence behavior, reproduction and susceptibility to pathogens. In Sub-Saharan Africa, two major malaria vectors, Anopheles gambiae and An. coluzzii, breed in distinct larval habitats characterized by different microorganisms that might affect their adult physiology and possibly Plasmodium transmission. We analyzed the reproductive microbiomes of male and female An. gambiae and An. coluzzii couples collected from natural mating swarms in Burkina Faso. 16S rRNA sequencing on dissected tissues revealed that the reproductive tracts harbor a complex microbiome characterized by a large core group of bacteria shared by both species and all reproductive tissues. Interestingly, we detected a significant enrichment of several gender-associated microbial biomarkers in specific tissues, and surprisingly, similar classes of bacteria in males captured from one mating swarm, suggesting that these males originated from the same larval breeding site. Finally, we identified several endosymbiotic bacteria, including Spiroplasma, which have the ability to manipulate insect reproductive success. Our study provides a comprehensive analysis of the reproductive microbiome of important human disease vectors, and identifies a panel of core and endosymbiotic bacteria that can be potentially exploited to interfere with the transmission of malaria parasites by the Anopheles mosquito.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus