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Osteoarthritis and all-cause mortality in worldwide populations: grading the evidence from a meta-analysis.

Xing D, Xu Y, Liu Q, Ke Y, Wang B, Li Z, Lin J - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Meta-analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the association between SxOA and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.68-1.23) and between ROA and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95-1.35).To summarize, there was no reliable and confident evidence existed currently in respect of the association between OA and all-cause mortality.Due to the very low level of evidence quality currently, high-quality studies are still required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arthritis Clinic &Research Center, Peking University People's Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to investigate the association between osteoarthritis (OA) and all-cause mortality in worldwide populations and to develop recommendations according to GRADE evidence levels. Literature search through Nov 2015 was performed using the electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO and Cochrane library). The prospective cohort trials that investigated the association between the symptomatic OA (SxOA) or radiological OA (ROA) and all-cause mortality were identified. Hazard ratios (HR) of all-cause mortality in patients with RxOA or ROA were pooled respectively. The evidence quality was evaluated using the GRADE system, while the recommendations were taken according to the quality. Nine of the published literature met the eligible criteria. Meta-analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the association between SxOA and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.68-1.23) and between ROA and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95-1.35). The overall GARDE evidence quality was very low, which will lower our confidence in taking recommendations. To summarize, there was no reliable and confident evidence existed currently in respect of the association between OA and all-cause mortality. Due to the very low level of evidence quality currently, high-quality studies are still required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plots showing an association between radiological (ROA) and the risk of all-cause mortality.
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f3: Forest plots showing an association between radiological (ROA) and the risk of all-cause mortality.

Mentions: In seven studies providing all-cause mortality in RxOA patients, the pooled HR was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.68–1.23). There was no significant difference in HR of all-cause mortality between the SxOA and control groups (Fig. 2). Six trials reported the all-cause mortality in ROA patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the ROA patients and control groups (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95–1.35) (Fig. 3).


Osteoarthritis and all-cause mortality in worldwide populations: grading the evidence from a meta-analysis.

Xing D, Xu Y, Liu Q, Ke Y, Wang B, Li Z, Lin J - Sci Rep (2016)

Forest plots showing an association between radiological (ROA) and the risk of all-cause mortality.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834546&req=5

f3: Forest plots showing an association between radiological (ROA) and the risk of all-cause mortality.
Mentions: In seven studies providing all-cause mortality in RxOA patients, the pooled HR was 0.91 (95% CI: 0.68–1.23). There was no significant difference in HR of all-cause mortality between the SxOA and control groups (Fig. 2). Six trials reported the all-cause mortality in ROA patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the ROA patients and control groups (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95–1.35) (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Meta-analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the association between SxOA and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.68-1.23) and between ROA and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95-1.35).To summarize, there was no reliable and confident evidence existed currently in respect of the association between OA and all-cause mortality.Due to the very low level of evidence quality currently, high-quality studies are still required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arthritis Clinic &Research Center, Peking University People's Hospital, Peking University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to investigate the association between osteoarthritis (OA) and all-cause mortality in worldwide populations and to develop recommendations according to GRADE evidence levels. Literature search through Nov 2015 was performed using the electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO and Cochrane library). The prospective cohort trials that investigated the association between the symptomatic OA (SxOA) or radiological OA (ROA) and all-cause mortality were identified. Hazard ratios (HR) of all-cause mortality in patients with RxOA or ROA were pooled respectively. The evidence quality was evaluated using the GRADE system, while the recommendations were taken according to the quality. Nine of the published literature met the eligible criteria. Meta-analysis revealed that there was no significant difference in the association between SxOA and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.68-1.23) and between ROA and all-cause mortality (HR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.95-1.35). The overall GARDE evidence quality was very low, which will lower our confidence in taking recommendations. To summarize, there was no reliable and confident evidence existed currently in respect of the association between OA and all-cause mortality. Due to the very low level of evidence quality currently, high-quality studies are still required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus