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Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

Biechl D, Tietje K, Gerlach G, Wullimann MF - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life.Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection.We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences &Department Biology II, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Grosshadernerstr. 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried Germany.

ABSTRACT
Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group reared full-sibling larvae prefer kin odor over non-kin odor in behavior test.Mean olfactory preference of larvae was tested using the two-channel choice flume. (A) Two-channel choice flume (after Hinz et al.)18. Two distinct parallel-flowing water masses A (orange) and B (grey) containing different odors are separated through a glass barrier (b). A sponge (s) reduces pulsation caused by the pump. i: inflow; m: mesh screen to prevent test fish leaving the area of laminar flow. (B) Full-siblings of test larvae (11 dpf) of kin odor test I (compare Fig. 1b) significantly prefer the smell of kin over non-kin (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -2.325, p = 0.020, median (Mdn) = 33.3, n = 11). (C) Full-siblings of test larvae (9dpf) of kin odor test II (compare Fig. 1c) showed a significant olfactory preference for kin compared to non-kin odor (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -3.065, p = 0.002, Mdn = 62.5, n = 12).
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f7: Group reared full-sibling larvae prefer kin odor over non-kin odor in behavior test.Mean olfactory preference of larvae was tested using the two-channel choice flume. (A) Two-channel choice flume (after Hinz et al.)18. Two distinct parallel-flowing water masses A (orange) and B (grey) containing different odors are separated through a glass barrier (b). A sponge (s) reduces pulsation caused by the pump. i: inflow; m: mesh screen to prevent test fish leaving the area of laminar flow. (B) Full-siblings of test larvae (11 dpf) of kin odor test I (compare Fig. 1b) significantly prefer the smell of kin over non-kin (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -2.325, p = 0.020, median (Mdn) = 33.3, n = 11). (C) Full-siblings of test larvae (9dpf) of kin odor test II (compare Fig. 1c) showed a significant olfactory preference for kin compared to non-kin odor (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -3.065, p = 0.002, Mdn = 62.5, n = 12).

Mentions: Finally, in both kin odor experiments, we tested 11 dpf or 9 dpf old larvae in a 2 channel choice flume (as established in the Gerlach laboratory151632; Fig. 7) which showed successful imprinting in both of these group reared larvae taken from the same batch, respectively, as the larvae used for the stimulation experiment.


Crypt cells are involved in kin recognition in larval zebrafish.

Biechl D, Tietje K, Gerlach G, Wullimann MF - Sci Rep (2016)

Group reared full-sibling larvae prefer kin odor over non-kin odor in behavior test.Mean olfactory preference of larvae was tested using the two-channel choice flume. (A) Two-channel choice flume (after Hinz et al.)18. Two distinct parallel-flowing water masses A (orange) and B (grey) containing different odors are separated through a glass barrier (b). A sponge (s) reduces pulsation caused by the pump. i: inflow; m: mesh screen to prevent test fish leaving the area of laminar flow. (B) Full-siblings of test larvae (11 dpf) of kin odor test I (compare Fig. 1b) significantly prefer the smell of kin over non-kin (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -2.325, p = 0.020, median (Mdn) = 33.3, n = 11). (C) Full-siblings of test larvae (9dpf) of kin odor test II (compare Fig. 1c) showed a significant olfactory preference for kin compared to non-kin odor (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -3.065, p = 0.002, Mdn = 62.5, n = 12).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834543&req=5

f7: Group reared full-sibling larvae prefer kin odor over non-kin odor in behavior test.Mean olfactory preference of larvae was tested using the two-channel choice flume. (A) Two-channel choice flume (after Hinz et al.)18. Two distinct parallel-flowing water masses A (orange) and B (grey) containing different odors are separated through a glass barrier (b). A sponge (s) reduces pulsation caused by the pump. i: inflow; m: mesh screen to prevent test fish leaving the area of laminar flow. (B) Full-siblings of test larvae (11 dpf) of kin odor test I (compare Fig. 1b) significantly prefer the smell of kin over non-kin (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -2.325, p = 0.020, median (Mdn) = 33.3, n = 11). (C) Full-siblings of test larvae (9dpf) of kin odor test II (compare Fig. 1c) showed a significant olfactory preference for kin compared to non-kin odor (Wilcoxon signed-rank test Z: -3.065, p = 0.002, Mdn = 62.5, n = 12).
Mentions: Finally, in both kin odor experiments, we tested 11 dpf or 9 dpf old larvae in a 2 channel choice flume (as established in the Gerlach laboratory151632; Fig. 7) which showed successful imprinting in both of these group reared larvae taken from the same batch, respectively, as the larvae used for the stimulation experiment.

Bottom Line: Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life.Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection.We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Systemic Neurosciences &Department Biology II, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Grosshadernerstr. 2, 82152 Planegg-Martinsried Germany.

ABSTRACT
Zebrafish larvae imprint on visual and olfactory kin cues at day 5 and 6 postfertilization, respectively, resulting in kin recognition later in life. Exposure to non-kin cues prevents imprinting and kin recognition. Imprinting depends on MHC class II related signals and only larvae sharing MHC class II alleles can imprint on each other. Here, we analyzed which type of olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) detects kin odor. The single teleost olfactory epithelium harbors ciliated OSNs carrying OR and TAAR gene family receptors (mammals: main olfactory epithelium) and microvillous OSNs with V1R and V2R gene family receptors (mammals: vomeronasal organ). Additionally, teleosts exhibit crypt cells which possess microvilli and cilia. We used the activity marker pERK (phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase) after stimulating 9 day old zebrafish larvae with either non-kin conspecific or food odor. While food odor activated both ciliated and microvillous OSNs, only the latter were activated by conspecific odor, crypt cells showed no activation to both stimuli. Then, we tested imprinted and non-imprinted larvae (full siblings) for kin odor detection. We provide the first direct evidence that crypt cells, and likely a subpopulation of microvillous OSNs, but not ciliated OSNs, play a role in detecting a kin odor related signal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus