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Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics.

Danewalia SS, Sharma G, Thakur S, Singh K - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions.The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases.The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, India.

ABSTRACT
Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Real part of the relative modulus variation with frequency at selected temperatures for (a) R-00 (b) R-50. Inset of the figures show the imaginary part of relative modulus of repective samples.
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f10: Real part of the relative modulus variation with frequency at selected temperatures for (a) R-00 (b) R-50. Inset of the figures show the imaginary part of relative modulus of repective samples.

Mentions: Modulus formulation is employed to ify the electrode effects. Representation of dielectric data in this form provides additional insight into the relaxation behaviour of the glasses46. The variation in M′(ω) and M″(ω) with frequency at selected temperatures is given in representative Fig. 10(a,b), respectively. For all the samples, the M′(ω) curves show the declination towards zero at low frequencies, indicating the suppression of electrode effects47. It confirms that the dielectric permittivity (previous section) at low frequencies is also contributed by the electrode polarisation. As for as M″(ω) is concerned, a universal feature of increasing M″(ω) at very high frequencies (>105 Hz) and very low frequencies (<103 Hz) is observed for all the samples. These features might be the residual parts of the relaxation peaks and might appear as complete peaks, if the measurements would have been taken above 106 Hz and below 103 Hz also. This hypothesis can be supported by the general fact that in glasses, M″ curve shifts to higher frequencies with increase in the temperature. A close observation of M″ curve for R-00 exhibits a relaxation peak at 400 °C, whose appearance might be a consequence of the peak shifting towards higher frequencies. Besides these observations, clear relaxation peaks can be seen for R-25 and R-50 glasses at selected temperatures. These peaks shift to the higher frequencies with increase in temperature. The position of these peaks separates the long range mobility region of ions (low frequencies) and the spatially confinement of the ions (high frequencies).


Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics.

Danewalia SS, Sharma G, Thakur S, Singh K - Sci Rep (2016)

Real part of the relative modulus variation with frequency at selected temperatures for (a) R-00 (b) R-50. Inset of the figures show the imaginary part of relative modulus of repective samples.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834533&req=5

f10: Real part of the relative modulus variation with frequency at selected temperatures for (a) R-00 (b) R-50. Inset of the figures show the imaginary part of relative modulus of repective samples.
Mentions: Modulus formulation is employed to ify the electrode effects. Representation of dielectric data in this form provides additional insight into the relaxation behaviour of the glasses46. The variation in M′(ω) and M″(ω) with frequency at selected temperatures is given in representative Fig. 10(a,b), respectively. For all the samples, the M′(ω) curves show the declination towards zero at low frequencies, indicating the suppression of electrode effects47. It confirms that the dielectric permittivity (previous section) at low frequencies is also contributed by the electrode polarisation. As for as M″(ω) is concerned, a universal feature of increasing M″(ω) at very high frequencies (>105 Hz) and very low frequencies (<103 Hz) is observed for all the samples. These features might be the residual parts of the relaxation peaks and might appear as complete peaks, if the measurements would have been taken above 106 Hz and below 103 Hz also. This hypothesis can be supported by the general fact that in glasses, M″ curve shifts to higher frequencies with increase in the temperature. A close observation of M″ curve for R-00 exhibits a relaxation peak at 400 °C, whose appearance might be a consequence of the peak shifting towards higher frequencies. Besides these observations, clear relaxation peaks can be seen for R-25 and R-50 glasses at selected temperatures. These peaks shift to the higher frequencies with increase in temperature. The position of these peaks separates the long range mobility region of ions (low frequencies) and the spatially confinement of the ions (high frequencies).

Bottom Line: Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions.The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases.The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, India.

ABSTRACT
Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus