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Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics.

Danewalia SS, Sharma G, Thakur S, Singh K - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions.The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases.The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, India.

ABSTRACT
Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

XRD patterns of the as-quenched samples.
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f1: XRD patterns of the as-quenched samples.

Mentions: X-ray diffraction. The XRD patterns of the as-quenched samples are shown in the Fig. 1. R-00, R-25 and R-50 exhibit amorphous nature as indicated by the broad XRD halos. A broad diffraction halo can clearly be seen around 17–35° in Fig. 1. It confirms the amorphous nature of the as-prepared samples. On the other hand, R-75 and R-100 are crystalline as evident from the sharp diffraction peaks. The XRD peaks of R-75 sample are indexed with cristobalite (ICDD no.-01-077-1317) and tridymite (ICDD no.-01-083-1339). On the other hand, R-100 sample is indexed with cristobalite (ICDD no.-01-075-0923) and tridymite (ICDD no.-01-076-0894). The volume fraction of these phases are calculated using direct comparison method18. The volume fraction of cristobalite and tridymite is 79 and 21%, respectively in R-75. The volume fraction of cristobalite increases in case of R-100 and becomes ~93%. The higher amount of SiO2 (as given in Table 1) may be responsible to increase the volume fraction of cristobalite phase as compared to tridymite phase in R-100 sample. The presence of alkali and alkaline earth metals may act as catalyst for the formation of tridymite phase19.


Agricultural wastes as a resource of raw materials for developing low-dielectric glass-ceramics.

Danewalia SS, Sharma G, Thakur S, Singh K - Sci Rep (2016)

XRD patterns of the as-quenched samples.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834533&req=5

f1: XRD patterns of the as-quenched samples.
Mentions: X-ray diffraction. The XRD patterns of the as-quenched samples are shown in the Fig. 1. R-00, R-25 and R-50 exhibit amorphous nature as indicated by the broad XRD halos. A broad diffraction halo can clearly be seen around 17–35° in Fig. 1. It confirms the amorphous nature of the as-prepared samples. On the other hand, R-75 and R-100 are crystalline as evident from the sharp diffraction peaks. The XRD peaks of R-75 sample are indexed with cristobalite (ICDD no.-01-077-1317) and tridymite (ICDD no.-01-083-1339). On the other hand, R-100 sample is indexed with cristobalite (ICDD no.-01-075-0923) and tridymite (ICDD no.-01-076-0894). The volume fraction of these phases are calculated using direct comparison method18. The volume fraction of cristobalite and tridymite is 79 and 21%, respectively in R-75. The volume fraction of cristobalite increases in case of R-100 and becomes ~93%. The higher amount of SiO2 (as given in Table 1) may be responsible to increase the volume fraction of cristobalite phase as compared to tridymite phase in R-100 sample. The presence of alkali and alkaline earth metals may act as catalyst for the formation of tridymite phase19.

Bottom Line: Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions.The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases.The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004, India.

ABSTRACT
Agricultural waste ashes are used as resource materials to synthesize new glass and glass-ceramics. The as-prepared materials are characterized using various techniques for their structural and dielectric properties to check their suitability in microelectronic applications. Sugarcane leaves ash exhibits higher content of alkali metal oxides than rice husk ash, which reduces the melting point of the components due to eutectic reactions. The addition of sugarcane leaves ash in rice husk ash promotes the glass formation. Additionally, it prevents the cristobalite phase formation. These materials are inherently porous, which is responsible for low dielectric permittivity i.e. 9 to 40. The presence of less ordered augite phase enhances the dielectric permittivity as compared to cristobalite and tridymite phases. The present glass-ceramics exhibit lower losses than similar materials synthesized using conventional minerals. The dielectric permittivity is independent to a wide range of temperature and frequency. The glass-ceramics developed with adequately devitrified phases can be used in microelectronic devices and other dielectric applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus