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AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap.

Horneck G, Walter N, Westall F, Grenfell JL, Martin WF, Gomez F, Leuko S, Lee N, Onofri S, Tsiganis K, Saladino R, Pilat-Lohinger E, Palomba E, Harrison J, Rull F, Muller C, Strazzulla G, Brucato JR, Rettberg P, Capria MT - Astrobiology (2016)

Bottom Line: In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond.The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives.The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 European Astrobiology Network Association .

ABSTRACT
The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system.

No MeSH data available.


Timeline in million years from the formation of the Solar System to the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. [1] Cloud, 1948; [2] Grosberg and Strathmann, 2008; [3] Knoll, 2011; [4] Mills et al., 2014; [5] Javaux, 2007; [6] Parfrey et al., 2011; [7] Melezhik, 2006; [8] Holland, 2006; [9] Nisbet and Wilks, 1988; [10] Altermann and Wotherspoon, 1995; [11] Dhuime et al., 2015; [12] Byerly et al., 1986; [13] Hofmann et al., 1999; [14] Tice and Lowe, 2004; [15] Westall and Southam, 2006; [16] Walsh, 1992; [17] Westall, 2011; [18] Ohtomo et al., 2013; [19] Tera et al., 1974; [20] Holland, 1984; [21] Van Kranendonk et al., 2015; [22] Westall, 2012; [23] Elkins-Tanton, 2012; [24] Wilde et al., 2001; [25] Lebrun et al., 2013; [26] Zahnle et al., 1988; [27] Kleine et al., 2005; [28] Dalrymple, 2001; [29] Sagan and Mullen, 1972; [30] Gough, 1981; [31] Feulner, 2012; [32] Walsh et al., 2011; [33] Baker et al., 2005.
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f1: Timeline in million years from the formation of the Solar System to the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. [1] Cloud, 1948; [2] Grosberg and Strathmann, 2008; [3] Knoll, 2011; [4] Mills et al., 2014; [5] Javaux, 2007; [6] Parfrey et al., 2011; [7] Melezhik, 2006; [8] Holland, 2006; [9] Nisbet and Wilks, 1988; [10] Altermann and Wotherspoon, 1995; [11] Dhuime et al., 2015; [12] Byerly et al., 1986; [13] Hofmann et al., 1999; [14] Tice and Lowe, 2004; [15] Westall and Southam, 2006; [16] Walsh, 1992; [17] Westall, 2011; [18] Ohtomo et al., 2013; [19] Tera et al., 1974; [20] Holland, 1984; [21] Van Kranendonk et al., 2015; [22] Westall, 2012; [23] Elkins-Tanton, 2012; [24] Wilde et al., 2001; [25] Lebrun et al., 2013; [26] Zahnle et al., 1988; [27] Kleine et al., 2005; [28] Dalrymple, 2001; [29] Sagan and Mullen, 1972; [30] Gough, 1981; [31] Feulner, 2012; [32] Walsh et al., 2011; [33] Baker et al., 2005.

Mentions: As one of the main questions of astrobiology, the origin and evolution of life on Earth has attracted great interest from many different fields of expertise. The presence of life has changed the panorama of primitive Earth. Indeed, one of the difficulties concerning study of primitive Earth, upon which life arose, comes from the fact that life itself changed its environment. Life is a physicochemical process that takes inputs from the exterior in order to auto-organize its interior, modifying the environment in the process. Several crucial events took place along the timeline of Earth's history up to the period when environmental conditions allowed an explosion in biodiversity resulting in the multitude of species colonizing all habitable environments of Earth, as we know it today (Fig. 1). Earth's timeline starts about 4600 million years ago, when the planet formed from the accretion disc revolving around a young star. Even during this very early phase, complex organic molecules necessary for later life may already have formed in the protoplanetary disc of gas and dust grains. The formation of the Moon had important consequences from an astrobiological point of view. Very soon after its consolidation, 4500 million years (or 4.5 billion years) ago, and according to the giant impact hypothesis, the Moon was formed when planet Earth and another hypothesized planet collided (Hartmann and Davis, 1975). It has been suggested that the newly formed Moon stabilized Earth's fluctuating axis of rotation due to its gravitational pull and, hence, the environmental conditions in which life formed. Meanwhile, several other events took place during the formation of the gas giants and rocky planets.


AstRoMap European Astrobiology Roadmap.

Horneck G, Walter N, Westall F, Grenfell JL, Martin WF, Gomez F, Leuko S, Lee N, Onofri S, Tsiganis K, Saladino R, Pilat-Lohinger E, Palomba E, Harrison J, Rull F, Muller C, Strazzulla G, Brucato JR, Rettberg P, Capria MT - Astrobiology (2016)

Timeline in million years from the formation of the Solar System to the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. [1] Cloud, 1948; [2] Grosberg and Strathmann, 2008; [3] Knoll, 2011; [4] Mills et al., 2014; [5] Javaux, 2007; [6] Parfrey et al., 2011; [7] Melezhik, 2006; [8] Holland, 2006; [9] Nisbet and Wilks, 1988; [10] Altermann and Wotherspoon, 1995; [11] Dhuime et al., 2015; [12] Byerly et al., 1986; [13] Hofmann et al., 1999; [14] Tice and Lowe, 2004; [15] Westall and Southam, 2006; [16] Walsh, 1992; [17] Westall, 2011; [18] Ohtomo et al., 2013; [19] Tera et al., 1974; [20] Holland, 1984; [21] Van Kranendonk et al., 2015; [22] Westall, 2012; [23] Elkins-Tanton, 2012; [24] Wilde et al., 2001; [25] Lebrun et al., 2013; [26] Zahnle et al., 1988; [27] Kleine et al., 2005; [28] Dalrymple, 2001; [29] Sagan and Mullen, 1972; [30] Gough, 1981; [31] Feulner, 2012; [32] Walsh et al., 2011; [33] Baker et al., 2005.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
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f1: Timeline in million years from the formation of the Solar System to the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. [1] Cloud, 1948; [2] Grosberg and Strathmann, 2008; [3] Knoll, 2011; [4] Mills et al., 2014; [5] Javaux, 2007; [6] Parfrey et al., 2011; [7] Melezhik, 2006; [8] Holland, 2006; [9] Nisbet and Wilks, 1988; [10] Altermann and Wotherspoon, 1995; [11] Dhuime et al., 2015; [12] Byerly et al., 1986; [13] Hofmann et al., 1999; [14] Tice and Lowe, 2004; [15] Westall and Southam, 2006; [16] Walsh, 1992; [17] Westall, 2011; [18] Ohtomo et al., 2013; [19] Tera et al., 1974; [20] Holland, 1984; [21] Van Kranendonk et al., 2015; [22] Westall, 2012; [23] Elkins-Tanton, 2012; [24] Wilde et al., 2001; [25] Lebrun et al., 2013; [26] Zahnle et al., 1988; [27] Kleine et al., 2005; [28] Dalrymple, 2001; [29] Sagan and Mullen, 1972; [30] Gough, 1981; [31] Feulner, 2012; [32] Walsh et al., 2011; [33] Baker et al., 2005.
Mentions: As one of the main questions of astrobiology, the origin and evolution of life on Earth has attracted great interest from many different fields of expertise. The presence of life has changed the panorama of primitive Earth. Indeed, one of the difficulties concerning study of primitive Earth, upon which life arose, comes from the fact that life itself changed its environment. Life is a physicochemical process that takes inputs from the exterior in order to auto-organize its interior, modifying the environment in the process. Several crucial events took place along the timeline of Earth's history up to the period when environmental conditions allowed an explosion in biodiversity resulting in the multitude of species colonizing all habitable environments of Earth, as we know it today (Fig. 1). Earth's timeline starts about 4600 million years ago, when the planet formed from the accretion disc revolving around a young star. Even during this very early phase, complex organic molecules necessary for later life may already have formed in the protoplanetary disc of gas and dust grains. The formation of the Moon had important consequences from an astrobiological point of view. Very soon after its consolidation, 4500 million years (or 4.5 billion years) ago, and according to the giant impact hypothesis, the Moon was formed when planet Earth and another hypothesized planet collided (Hartmann and Davis, 1975). It has been suggested that the newly formed Moon stabilized Earth's fluctuating axis of rotation due to its gravitational pull and, hence, the environmental conditions in which life formed. Meanwhile, several other events took place during the formation of the gas giants and rocky planets.

Bottom Line: In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond.The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives.The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 European Astrobiology Network Association .

ABSTRACT
The European AstRoMap project (supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Programme) surveyed the state of the art of astrobiology in Europe and beyond and produced the first European roadmap for astrobiology research. In the context of this roadmap, astrobiology is understood as the study of the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the context of cosmic evolution; this includes habitability in the Solar System and beyond. The AstRoMap Roadmap identifies five research topics, specifies several key scientific objectives for each topic, and suggests ways to achieve all the objectives. The five AstRoMap Research Topics are • Research Topic 1: Origin and Evolution of Planetary Systems • Research Topic 2: Origins of Organic Compounds in Space • Research Topic 3: Rock-Water-Carbon Interactions, Organic Synthesis on Earth, and Steps to Life • Research Topic 4: Life and Habitability • Research Topic 5: Biosignatures as Facilitating Life Detection It is strongly recommended that steps be taken towards the definition and implementation of a European Astrobiology Platform (or Institute) to streamline and optimize the scientific return by using a coordinated infrastructure and funding system.

No MeSH data available.