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A simple and general strategy for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

Zhang X, Xu C, Ren Z - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: To reduce the required flux, a promising solution is to use highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs, which are known to induce two-photon transitions much more efficiently.It is shown quantitatively that this strategy can generate highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs which can dramatically enhance two-photon excitation efficiency.We believe the proposed strategy can guide new designs for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, China.

ABSTRACT
Currently, two-photon excitation microscopy is the method of choice for imaging living cells within thick specimen. A remaining problem for this technique is the damage caused by the high photon flux in the excitation region. To reduce the required flux, a promising solution is to use highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs, which are known to induce two-photon transitions much more efficiently. It is still an open question what the best scheme is for generating such photon pairs. Here we propose one simple general strategy for this task. As an example, we show explicitly that this general strategy can be realized faithfully within the widely applicable coherently pumped Jaynes-Cummings model. It is shown quantitatively that this strategy can generate highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs which can dramatically enhance two-photon excitation efficiency. We believe the proposed strategy can guide new designs for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The three-level model used for estimating the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence.The two incoming photons (represented by the red wiggly arrows) induce the two-photon transition from /g〉 to /e〉 via the far detuned intermediate state /m〉. The fluorescent photons (blue wiggly arrow) comes from the decay of the excited state /e〉. We use this simple model to compare the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence due to the frequency-anticorrelated photon pair (equation (6)) and that due to an uncorrelated photon pair (equation (7)).
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f6: The three-level model used for estimating the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence.The two incoming photons (represented by the red wiggly arrows) induce the two-photon transition from /g〉 to /e〉 via the far detuned intermediate state /m〉. The fluorescent photons (blue wiggly arrow) comes from the decay of the excited state /e〉. We use this simple model to compare the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence due to the frequency-anticorrelated photon pair (equation (6)) and that due to an uncorrelated photon pair (equation (7)).

Mentions: To answer these questions, we use a simple three-level model to simulate the processes of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence. The three-level model, as is commonly used in the analysis of two-photon excitation3435, consists of a ground state /g〉, an intermediate state /m〉, and a final excited state /e〉 (cf. Fig. 6). The amount of fluorescence is given by the accumulative decay from the state /e〉 into modes other than the continuum modes carrying the incoming photon pairs. In the present work we restrict ourselves to a resonant two-photon excitation and a far detuned intermediate state. For the frequency-anticorrelated photon pair generated using the coherently pumped JC model, the initial condition is given by equation (6). For uncorrelated photon pairs, without loss of generality the initial condition can be written in the following product form1819:


A simple and general strategy for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

Zhang X, Xu C, Ren Z - Sci Rep (2016)

The three-level model used for estimating the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence.The two incoming photons (represented by the red wiggly arrows) induce the two-photon transition from /g〉 to /e〉 via the far detuned intermediate state /m〉. The fluorescent photons (blue wiggly arrow) comes from the decay of the excited state /e〉. We use this simple model to compare the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence due to the frequency-anticorrelated photon pair (equation (6)) and that due to an uncorrelated photon pair (equation (7)).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834487&req=5

f6: The three-level model used for estimating the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence.The two incoming photons (represented by the red wiggly arrows) induce the two-photon transition from /g〉 to /e〉 via the far detuned intermediate state /m〉. The fluorescent photons (blue wiggly arrow) comes from the decay of the excited state /e〉. We use this simple model to compare the amount of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence due to the frequency-anticorrelated photon pair (equation (6)) and that due to an uncorrelated photon pair (equation (7)).
Mentions: To answer these questions, we use a simple three-level model to simulate the processes of two-photon excitation induced fluorescence. The three-level model, as is commonly used in the analysis of two-photon excitation3435, consists of a ground state /g〉, an intermediate state /m〉, and a final excited state /e〉 (cf. Fig. 6). The amount of fluorescence is given by the accumulative decay from the state /e〉 into modes other than the continuum modes carrying the incoming photon pairs. In the present work we restrict ourselves to a resonant two-photon excitation and a far detuned intermediate state. For the frequency-anticorrelated photon pair generated using the coherently pumped JC model, the initial condition is given by equation (6). For uncorrelated photon pairs, without loss of generality the initial condition can be written in the following product form1819:

Bottom Line: To reduce the required flux, a promising solution is to use highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs, which are known to induce two-photon transitions much more efficiently.It is shown quantitatively that this strategy can generate highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs which can dramatically enhance two-photon excitation efficiency.We believe the proposed strategy can guide new designs for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210008, China.

ABSTRACT
Currently, two-photon excitation microscopy is the method of choice for imaging living cells within thick specimen. A remaining problem for this technique is the damage caused by the high photon flux in the excitation region. To reduce the required flux, a promising solution is to use highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs, which are known to induce two-photon transitions much more efficiently. It is still an open question what the best scheme is for generating such photon pairs. Here we propose one simple general strategy for this task. As an example, we show explicitly that this general strategy can be realized faithfully within the widely applicable coherently pumped Jaynes-Cummings model. It is shown quantitatively that this strategy can generate highly frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs which can dramatically enhance two-photon excitation efficiency. We believe the proposed strategy can guide new designs for generating frequency-anticorrelated photon pairs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus