Limits...
Hemoglobin consumption by P. falciparum in individual erythrocytes imaged via quantitative phase spectroscopy.

Rinehart MT, Park HS, Walzer KA, Chi JT, Wax A - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475-700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell.Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells.The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, US.

ABSTRACT
Plasmodium falciparum infection causes structural and biochemical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). To quantify these changes, we apply a novel optical technique, quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) to characterize individual red blood cells (RBCs) during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum. QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475-700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell. The complex field provides complimentary information on hemoglobin content and cell mass, which are both found to dramatically change upon infection by P. falciparum. Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells. Infection also resulted in a 33.1% reduction in RBC's optical volume, a measure of the cells' non-aqueous components. Notably, optical volume is only partially correlated with hemoglobin content, suggesting that changes in other dry mass components such as parasite mass may also be assessed using this technique. The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Quantitative Phase Spectroscopy system: (PC) polarization controller, (LP) linear polarizer, (BS) beam splitter, (RR) retroreflector mirror pair, (MO) microscope objective.Sample (S) and reference (R) beams are imaged by matched MOs onto the camera.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834482&req=5

f1: Quantitative Phase Spectroscopy system: (PC) polarization controller, (LP) linear polarizer, (BS) beam splitter, (RR) retroreflector mirror pair, (MO) microscope objective.Sample (S) and reference (R) beams are imaged by matched MOs onto the camera.

Mentions: The quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) instrument has been described previously17 and is presented in Fig. 1. A supercontinuum laser (Fianium SC-400-4) spanning 450–750 nm is used for illumination. The broadband light is filtered to produce a 1.12 nm spectral full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth with a tunable center wavelength using a spectral filter. The filter disperses light using a 300 lp/mm transmission diffraction grating (Thorlabs, GT25-03), and a galvanometric scanning mirror (GSM) to pass only a selected bandwidth as input to the interferometer. The filtered light is passed through a single-mode fiber (Thorlabs, 405-XP) to remove the spatio-spectral variation, and a polarization controller paddle (PC) and subsequent linear polarizer (LP) are used to minimize polarization variations. After this conditioning, approximately 150 μW of optical power is delivered into the interferometer as a collimated beam.


Hemoglobin consumption by P. falciparum in individual erythrocytes imaged via quantitative phase spectroscopy.

Rinehart MT, Park HS, Walzer KA, Chi JT, Wax A - Sci Rep (2016)

Quantitative Phase Spectroscopy system: (PC) polarization controller, (LP) linear polarizer, (BS) beam splitter, (RR) retroreflector mirror pair, (MO) microscope objective.Sample (S) and reference (R) beams are imaged by matched MOs onto the camera.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834482&req=5

f1: Quantitative Phase Spectroscopy system: (PC) polarization controller, (LP) linear polarizer, (BS) beam splitter, (RR) retroreflector mirror pair, (MO) microscope objective.Sample (S) and reference (R) beams are imaged by matched MOs onto the camera.
Mentions: The quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) instrument has been described previously17 and is presented in Fig. 1. A supercontinuum laser (Fianium SC-400-4) spanning 450–750 nm is used for illumination. The broadband light is filtered to produce a 1.12 nm spectral full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth with a tunable center wavelength using a spectral filter. The filter disperses light using a 300 lp/mm transmission diffraction grating (Thorlabs, GT25-03), and a galvanometric scanning mirror (GSM) to pass only a selected bandwidth as input to the interferometer. The filtered light is passed through a single-mode fiber (Thorlabs, 405-XP) to remove the spatio-spectral variation, and a polarization controller paddle (PC) and subsequent linear polarizer (LP) are used to minimize polarization variations. After this conditioning, approximately 150 μW of optical power is delivered into the interferometer as a collimated beam.

Bottom Line: QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475-700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell.Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells.The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, US.

ABSTRACT
Plasmodium falciparum infection causes structural and biochemical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). To quantify these changes, we apply a novel optical technique, quantitative phase spectroscopy (QPS) to characterize individual red blood cells (RBCs) during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum. QPS captures hyperspectral holograms of individual RBCs to measure spectroscopic changes across the visible wavelength range (475-700 nm), providing complex information, i.e. amplitude and phase, about the light field which has interacted with the cell. The complex field provides complimentary information on hemoglobin content and cell mass, which are both found to dramatically change upon infection by P. falciparum. Hb content progressively decreases with parasite life cycle, with an average 72.2% reduction observed for RBCs infected by schizont-stage P. falciparum compared to uninfected cells. Infection also resulted in a 33.1% reduction in RBC's optical volume, a measure of the cells' non-aqueous components. Notably, optical volume is only partially correlated with hemoglobin content, suggesting that changes in other dry mass components such as parasite mass may also be assessed using this technique. The unique ability of QPS to discriminate individual healthy and infected cells using spectroscopic changes indicates that the approach can be used to detect disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus