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Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

Nho HW, Kalegowda Y, Shin HJ, Yoon TH - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components.Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated.This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul, 04763, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time-lapse TXM images of 500 nm SiO2 particles in hydrated condition.(A–F) Drying process of colloids was observed with 13 second interval time. Fixed particles were marked as arrows in (A). (B) Assembled particles along the meniscus. (C) The successive linear migration of suspended particles to fill voids (white dash box). (D,E) Reduced blurred regions corresponding to moving colloids in the hydrated condition. (F) Completely dried colloids.
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f5: Time-lapse TXM images of 500 nm SiO2 particles in hydrated condition.(A–F) Drying process of colloids was observed with 13 second interval time. Fixed particles were marked as arrows in (A). (B) Assembled particles along the meniscus. (C) The successive linear migration of suspended particles to fill voids (white dash box). (D,E) Reduced blurred regions corresponding to moving colloids in the hydrated condition. (F) Completely dried colloids.

Mentions: Another advantage of soft X-ray TXM imaging at water window is that it allows us to perform in situ observation of PCs during their growing process, which may help us to elucidate the mechanism of their growth and defect formation. In order to demonstrate the in situ observation capability of TXM for the PCs under hydrated condition, drying process of colloidal particles was monitored in time lapse mode with an interval time of approximately 13 seconds (see Fig. 5). At the edges of the hydrated sample, rearrangement of colloidal particles was consistently observed until the end of drying process. As shown in Fig. 5, thickness of the colloidal solution was not uniform. In thicker regions of the sample, we could not observe the clear shape of suspended particles, probably due to the fast movement of particles by Brownian motion. However, as the drying process continues, evaporation of solvent and resultant capillary action near the meniscus provided the driving force for the successive migration of suspended colloidal particles from thicker regions of the solution to the shallow boundary regions.


Nanoscale characterization of local structures and defects in photonic crystals using synchrotron-based transmission soft X-ray microscopy.

Nho HW, Kalegowda Y, Shin HJ, Yoon TH - Sci Rep (2016)

Time-lapse TXM images of 500 nm SiO2 particles in hydrated condition.(A–F) Drying process of colloids was observed with 13 second interval time. Fixed particles were marked as arrows in (A). (B) Assembled particles along the meniscus. (C) The successive linear migration of suspended particles to fill voids (white dash box). (D,E) Reduced blurred regions corresponding to moving colloids in the hydrated condition. (F) Completely dried colloids.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834481&req=5

f5: Time-lapse TXM images of 500 nm SiO2 particles in hydrated condition.(A–F) Drying process of colloids was observed with 13 second interval time. Fixed particles were marked as arrows in (A). (B) Assembled particles along the meniscus. (C) The successive linear migration of suspended particles to fill voids (white dash box). (D,E) Reduced blurred regions corresponding to moving colloids in the hydrated condition. (F) Completely dried colloids.
Mentions: Another advantage of soft X-ray TXM imaging at water window is that it allows us to perform in situ observation of PCs during their growing process, which may help us to elucidate the mechanism of their growth and defect formation. In order to demonstrate the in situ observation capability of TXM for the PCs under hydrated condition, drying process of colloidal particles was monitored in time lapse mode with an interval time of approximately 13 seconds (see Fig. 5). At the edges of the hydrated sample, rearrangement of colloidal particles was consistently observed until the end of drying process. As shown in Fig. 5, thickness of the colloidal solution was not uniform. In thicker regions of the sample, we could not observe the clear shape of suspended particles, probably due to the fast movement of particles by Brownian motion. However, as the drying process continues, evaporation of solvent and resultant capillary action near the meniscus provided the driving force for the successive migration of suspended colloidal particles from thicker regions of the solution to the shallow boundary regions.

Bottom Line: Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components.Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated.This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul, 04763, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
For the structural characterization of the polystyrene (PS)-based photonic crystals (PCs), fast and direct imaging capabilities of full field transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) were demonstrated at soft X-ray energy. PS-based PCs were prepared on an O2-plasma treated Si3N4 window and their local structures and defects were investigated using this label-free TXM technique with an image acquisition speed of ~10 sec/frame and marginal radiation damage. Micro-domains of face-centered cubic (FCC (111)) and hexagonal close-packed (HCP (0001)) structures were dominantly found in PS-based PCs, while point and line defects, FCC (100), and 12-fold symmetry structures were also identified as minor components. Additionally, in situ observation capability for hydrated samples and 3D tomographic reconstruction of TXM images were also demonstrated. This soft X-ray full field TXM technique with faster image acquisition speed, in situ observation, and 3D tomography capability can be complementally used with the other X-ray microscopic techniques (i.e., scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, STXM) as well as conventional characterization methods (e.g., electron microscopic and optical/fluorescence microscopic techniques) for clearer structure identification of self-assembled PCs and better understanding of the relationship between their structures and resultant optical properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus