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The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee.

Uman E, Colonna-Dashwood M, Colonna-Dashwood L, Perger M, Klatt C, Leighton S, Miller B, Butler KT, Melot BC, Speirs RW, Hendon CH - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates.We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method.Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Meritics Ltd., 1 Kensworth Gate, Dunstable, LU6 3HS, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Upper panel: The particle size distribution as a function of number (cumulative) of physical particles (shown in blue) and the integral of this data (shown in grey), yields 99% of the particles with a diameter of 70 μm or less.The fine particular cutoff is depicted as a purple dashed line. Middle and lower panel: The grind profiles of the four coffees examined here. The cumulative number and surface area contribution are shown in solid and dashed lines, respectively. The Tanzanian, Ethoipian, El Salvadorian and Guatemalan profiles are shown in black, purple, red and blue, respectively. Data modes i-vi are included for visual aid: i - 14.3, ii - 27.4, iii - 282.1, iv - 13.0, v - 27.4 and vi - 256.9 μm.
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f3: Upper panel: The particle size distribution as a function of number (cumulative) of physical particles (shown in blue) and the integral of this data (shown in grey), yields 99% of the particles with a diameter of 70 μm or less.The fine particular cutoff is depicted as a purple dashed line. Middle and lower panel: The grind profiles of the four coffees examined here. The cumulative number and surface area contribution are shown in solid and dashed lines, respectively. The Tanzanian, Ethoipian, El Salvadorian and Guatemalan profiles are shown in black, purple, red and blue, respectively. Data modes i-vi are included for visual aid: i - 14.3, ii - 27.4, iii - 282.1, iv - 13.0, v - 27.4 and vi - 256.9 μm.

Mentions: Here we are concerned with the deviations in grind profile as a function of coffee origin, although before embarking on these experiments it was unclear what the grind profile looked like. The EK 43 produces particles ranging from 0.1 μm to 1000 μm, and whilst we have elected to present most of the data on a logarithmic scale, the linear scale is shown for the Tanzanian coffee in the upper panel of Fig. 3. All grind profiles appear as a skewed-Gaussian shape. In this case, we present the particle number distribution in the shaded blue region, and the integral in grey. We can arbitrarily define the fine particulate cutoff, graphically represented as a purple dashed line = n where:


The effect of bean origin and temperature on grinding roasted coffee.

Uman E, Colonna-Dashwood M, Colonna-Dashwood L, Perger M, Klatt C, Leighton S, Miller B, Butler KT, Melot BC, Speirs RW, Hendon CH - Sci Rep (2016)

Upper panel: The particle size distribution as a function of number (cumulative) of physical particles (shown in blue) and the integral of this data (shown in grey), yields 99% of the particles with a diameter of 70 μm or less.The fine particular cutoff is depicted as a purple dashed line. Middle and lower panel: The grind profiles of the four coffees examined here. The cumulative number and surface area contribution are shown in solid and dashed lines, respectively. The Tanzanian, Ethoipian, El Salvadorian and Guatemalan profiles are shown in black, purple, red and blue, respectively. Data modes i-vi are included for visual aid: i - 14.3, ii - 27.4, iii - 282.1, iv - 13.0, v - 27.4 and vi - 256.9 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834475&req=5

f3: Upper panel: The particle size distribution as a function of number (cumulative) of physical particles (shown in blue) and the integral of this data (shown in grey), yields 99% of the particles with a diameter of 70 μm or less.The fine particular cutoff is depicted as a purple dashed line. Middle and lower panel: The grind profiles of the four coffees examined here. The cumulative number and surface area contribution are shown in solid and dashed lines, respectively. The Tanzanian, Ethoipian, El Salvadorian and Guatemalan profiles are shown in black, purple, red and blue, respectively. Data modes i-vi are included for visual aid: i - 14.3, ii - 27.4, iii - 282.1, iv - 13.0, v - 27.4 and vi - 256.9 μm.
Mentions: Here we are concerned with the deviations in grind profile as a function of coffee origin, although before embarking on these experiments it was unclear what the grind profile looked like. The EK 43 produces particles ranging from 0.1 μm to 1000 μm, and whilst we have elected to present most of the data on a logarithmic scale, the linear scale is shown for the Tanzanian coffee in the upper panel of Fig. 3. All grind profiles appear as a skewed-Gaussian shape. In this case, we present the particle number distribution in the shaded blue region, and the integral in grey. We can arbitrarily define the fine particulate cutoff, graphically represented as a purple dashed line = n where:

Bottom Line: Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates.We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method.Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Meritics Ltd., 1 Kensworth Gate, Dunstable, LU6 3HS, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Coffee is prepared by the extraction of a complex array of organic molecules from the roasted bean, which has been ground into fine particulates. The extraction depends on temperature, water chemistry and also the accessible surface area of the coffee. Here we investigate whether variations in the production processes of single origin coffee beans affects the particle size distribution upon grinding. We find that the particle size distribution is independent of the bean origin and processing method. Furthermore, we elucidate the influence of bean temperature on particle size distribution, concluding that grinding cold results in a narrower particle size distribution, and reduced mean particle size. We anticipate these results will influence the production of coffee industrially, as well as contribute to how we store and use coffee daily.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus