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Atrial fibrillation and flutter following coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A retrospective study and review.

Premaratne S, Premaratne ID, Fernando ND, Williams L, Hasaniya NW - JRSM Cardiovasc Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: An additional 39 records of patients who did not develop these complications were also reviewed as a control group.The time of onset, weight gain, elapsed time, fluid status (in/out), hematocrit, and drug regimens were compared between the two groups.The differences in weight gain, fluid status, and hematocrit between the groups were not significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, USA; Virginia Union University, USA; Department of Surgery, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, USA; Research Laboratory at the Queen's Medical Center, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction and objectives: Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia following coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Its incidence can range from 10 to 60% of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. This rhythm can result in shorter or longer intervals between beats.

Methods: Medical records of 143 patients from the Queen's Medical Center, Kuakini Medical Center, Saint Francis Medical Center, and Straub Hospital and Clinic, all of which are located in Honolulu, Hawaii were reviewed. An additional 39 records of patients who did not develop these complications were also reviewed as a control group. Patients were selected according to the ICD codes for atrial fibrillation/flutter and coronary artery bypass graft. Both anomalies can lead to increased health care costs, morbidity, and mortality. In this study, possible predisposing factors to these complications were investigated. The time of onset, weight gain, elapsed time, fluid status (in/out), hematocrit, and drug regimens were compared between the two groups.

Results: The differences in weight gain, fluid status, and hematocrit between the groups were not significant. There were a total of 17 different drugs prescribed to the group as a whole but not every patient received the same regimen.

Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation and flutter were found to be more common in males, particularly between the ages of 60 and 69 years. There were no other significant findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Based on the fluid control, 1000+ ml displayed the most significant amount of fluid change. The control group showed a statistically insignificant difference in fluid control.
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fig5-2048004016634149: Based on the fluid control, 1000+ ml displayed the most significant amount of fluid change. The control group showed a statistically insignificant difference in fluid control.


Atrial fibrillation and flutter following coronary artery bypass graft surgery: A retrospective study and review.

Premaratne S, Premaratne ID, Fernando ND, Williams L, Hasaniya NW - JRSM Cardiovasc Dis (2016)

Based on the fluid control, 1000+ ml displayed the most significant amount of fluid change. The control group showed a statistically insignificant difference in fluid control.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834471&req=5

fig5-2048004016634149: Based on the fluid control, 1000+ ml displayed the most significant amount of fluid change. The control group showed a statistically insignificant difference in fluid control.
Bottom Line: An additional 39 records of patients who did not develop these complications were also reviewed as a control group.The time of onset, weight gain, elapsed time, fluid status (in/out), hematocrit, and drug regimens were compared between the two groups.The differences in weight gain, fluid status, and hematocrit between the groups were not significant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hunter Holmes McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, USA; Virginia Union University, USA; Department of Surgery, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, USA; Research Laboratory at the Queen's Medical Center, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction and objectives: Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia following coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Its incidence can range from 10 to 60% of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. This rhythm can result in shorter or longer intervals between beats.

Methods: Medical records of 143 patients from the Queen's Medical Center, Kuakini Medical Center, Saint Francis Medical Center, and Straub Hospital and Clinic, all of which are located in Honolulu, Hawaii were reviewed. An additional 39 records of patients who did not develop these complications were also reviewed as a control group. Patients were selected according to the ICD codes for atrial fibrillation/flutter and coronary artery bypass graft. Both anomalies can lead to increased health care costs, morbidity, and mortality. In this study, possible predisposing factors to these complications were investigated. The time of onset, weight gain, elapsed time, fluid status (in/out), hematocrit, and drug regimens were compared between the two groups.

Results: The differences in weight gain, fluid status, and hematocrit between the groups were not significant. There were a total of 17 different drugs prescribed to the group as a whole but not every patient received the same regimen.

Conclusions: Atrial fibrillation and flutter were found to be more common in males, particularly between the ages of 60 and 69 years. There were no other significant findings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus