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The effects of distress and the dimensions of coping strategies on physicians' satisfaction with competence.

Lepnurm R, Nesdole R, Dobson RT, Peña-Sánchez JN - SAGE Open Med (2016)

Bottom Line: Comprehensive questionnaires on factors associated with Satisfaction with Competence were sent to a stratified sample of 5300 physicians across Canada.Laboratory and chronic care specialists reported greater than average coping abilities.Four groups of coping strategies were significant in relieving the pressures of work: (1) Collegiality, (2) Self-Care, (3) Managing Work, and (4) Positive Attitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MERCURi Research Group, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purposes of this study were to (1) articulate the dimensions of Coping strategies used by physicians, and (2) determine whether Coping strategies alleviated Distress and enhanced Satisfaction with Competence.

Methods: Comprehensive questionnaires on factors associated with Satisfaction with Competence were sent to a stratified sample of 5300 physicians across Canada. The response rate was 57% with negligible bias. Factor analysis was used to articulate the dimensions of Coping strategies. The classic Baron and Kenny regression series was used to establish whether Coping mediates the effects of Distress on Satisfaction with Competence. Years in Practice, Self-Reported Health, and Duties of Physicians were control factors.

Results: A reliable 15-item measure of Coping was confirmed (α = .76) with four reasonably reliable dimensions: Collegiality (α = .80), Attitude (α = .63), Managing Work (α = .60), and Self-Care (α = .62). Physicians reported a mean Satisfaction with Competence of (M = 4.26 out of 6.0, standard deviation (SD) = 0.64) with General practitioners reporting slightly lower levels of Satisfaction with Competence than average. Conversely, chronic disease, clinical, and procedural specialists reported higher levels of Satisfaction with Competence. The mean Distress level for all physicians was (M = 3.66 out of 7.0, SD = 0.93). The highest levels of distress were reported by emergency physicians, general practitioners, and surgeons. Clinical specialists, anesthesiologists, and psychiatrists reported the lowest levels of distress. Physicians reported (M = 4.48 out of 7.0, SD = 0.78) as the mean level of Coping ability with clinical specialists and general practitioners reporting lower than average abilities to cope. Laboratory and chronic care specialists reported greater than average coping abilities. Regression analyses established Coping as a mediator of Distress which predicted physicians' Satisfaction with Competence.

Conclusion: Four groups of coping strategies were significant in relieving the pressures of work: (1) Collegiality, (2) Self-Care, (3) Managing Work, and (4) Positive Attitude.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Effects of Distress and Coping Ability on Satisfaction with Competence.
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fig1-2050312116643907: The Effects of Distress and Coping Ability on Satisfaction with Competence.

Mentions: For visual corroboration, Scheffé statistics demarcated homogeneous subsets of Distress, Coping, and SwC, which clearly illustrated that at all five levels of Distress, as Coping ability increases so does SwC. Of the 2639 responding physicians, 300 reported very low Distress levels and of these, 161 physicians reported high levels of Coping and the highest ratings of SwC (M = 4.87, SD = 0.54), 81 physicians reported moderate levels of Coping with slightly lower ratings of SwC (M = 4.71, SD = 0.49), and 58 reported low levels of Coping with still lower ratings of SwC (M = 4.62, SD = 0.49). This pattern is repeated, with 349 physicians reporting very high levels of Distress and of these, 171 physicians reported low levels of Coping and the lowest ratings of SwC (M = 3.53, SD = 0.60), 106 physicians reported moderate levels of Coping with slightly higher ratings of SwC (M = 3.94, SD = 0.54), and 72 reported high levels of Coping with still higher ratings of SwC (M = 4.00, SD = 0.68). This pattern is consistent at all intermediate levels of Distress and Coping for ratings of SwC (Figure 1, Table 7).


The effects of distress and the dimensions of coping strategies on physicians' satisfaction with competence.

Lepnurm R, Nesdole R, Dobson RT, Peña-Sánchez JN - SAGE Open Med (2016)

The Effects of Distress and Coping Ability on Satisfaction with Competence.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834470&req=5

fig1-2050312116643907: The Effects of Distress and Coping Ability on Satisfaction with Competence.
Mentions: For visual corroboration, Scheffé statistics demarcated homogeneous subsets of Distress, Coping, and SwC, which clearly illustrated that at all five levels of Distress, as Coping ability increases so does SwC. Of the 2639 responding physicians, 300 reported very low Distress levels and of these, 161 physicians reported high levels of Coping and the highest ratings of SwC (M = 4.87, SD = 0.54), 81 physicians reported moderate levels of Coping with slightly lower ratings of SwC (M = 4.71, SD = 0.49), and 58 reported low levels of Coping with still lower ratings of SwC (M = 4.62, SD = 0.49). This pattern is repeated, with 349 physicians reporting very high levels of Distress and of these, 171 physicians reported low levels of Coping and the lowest ratings of SwC (M = 3.53, SD = 0.60), 106 physicians reported moderate levels of Coping with slightly higher ratings of SwC (M = 3.94, SD = 0.54), and 72 reported high levels of Coping with still higher ratings of SwC (M = 4.00, SD = 0.68). This pattern is consistent at all intermediate levels of Distress and Coping for ratings of SwC (Figure 1, Table 7).

Bottom Line: Comprehensive questionnaires on factors associated with Satisfaction with Competence were sent to a stratified sample of 5300 physicians across Canada.Laboratory and chronic care specialists reported greater than average coping abilities.Four groups of coping strategies were significant in relieving the pressures of work: (1) Collegiality, (2) Self-Care, (3) Managing Work, and (4) Positive Attitude.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MERCURi Research Group, School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The purposes of this study were to (1) articulate the dimensions of Coping strategies used by physicians, and (2) determine whether Coping strategies alleviated Distress and enhanced Satisfaction with Competence.

Methods: Comprehensive questionnaires on factors associated with Satisfaction with Competence were sent to a stratified sample of 5300 physicians across Canada. The response rate was 57% with negligible bias. Factor analysis was used to articulate the dimensions of Coping strategies. The classic Baron and Kenny regression series was used to establish whether Coping mediates the effects of Distress on Satisfaction with Competence. Years in Practice, Self-Reported Health, and Duties of Physicians were control factors.

Results: A reliable 15-item measure of Coping was confirmed (α = .76) with four reasonably reliable dimensions: Collegiality (α = .80), Attitude (α = .63), Managing Work (α = .60), and Self-Care (α = .62). Physicians reported a mean Satisfaction with Competence of (M = 4.26 out of 6.0, standard deviation (SD) = 0.64) with General practitioners reporting slightly lower levels of Satisfaction with Competence than average. Conversely, chronic disease, clinical, and procedural specialists reported higher levels of Satisfaction with Competence. The mean Distress level for all physicians was (M = 3.66 out of 7.0, SD = 0.93). The highest levels of distress were reported by emergency physicians, general practitioners, and surgeons. Clinical specialists, anesthesiologists, and psychiatrists reported the lowest levels of distress. Physicians reported (M = 4.48 out of 7.0, SD = 0.78) as the mean level of Coping ability with clinical specialists and general practitioners reporting lower than average abilities to cope. Laboratory and chronic care specialists reported greater than average coping abilities. Regression analyses established Coping as a mediator of Distress which predicted physicians' Satisfaction with Competence.

Conclusion: Four groups of coping strategies were significant in relieving the pressures of work: (1) Collegiality, (2) Self-Care, (3) Managing Work, and (4) Positive Attitude.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus