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Deaths averted by influenza vaccination in the U.S. during the seasons 2005/06 through 2013/14.

Foppa IM, Cheng PY, Reynolds SB, Shay DK, Carias C, Bresee JS, Kim IK, Gambhir M, Fry AM - Vaccine (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that of all studied seasons the most deaths were averted by influenza vaccination during the 2012/13 season (9398; 95% CI 2,386 to 19,897) and the fewest during the 2009/10 pandemic (222; 95% CI 79 to 347).Of all influenza-associated deaths averted, 88.9% (95% CI 83 to 92.5%) were in people ≥65 yrs. old.The estimated number of deaths averted by the US annual influenza vaccination program is considerable, especially among elderly adults and even when vaccine effectiveness is modest, such as in the 2012/13 season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS A-20, Atlanta, 30333 GA, USA; Battelle Memorial Institute, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: vor1@cdc.gov.

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The median number of deaths associated with influenza (excess mortality = EM) and the indicators for influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), A(H1N1) pdm09 and B viruses, October, 2005 through July, 2014.
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Figure 2: The median number of deaths associated with influenza (excess mortality = EM) and the indicators for influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), A(H1N1) pdm09 and B viruses, October, 2005 through July, 2014.

Mentions: During the study period, the highest numbers of deaths associated with influenza occurred during the season 2012/13, followed by 2007/8 and 2010/11 (Table 3). Each of these three seasons were dominated by circulation of influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses (Fig. 1). There were relatively few influenza-associated excess deaths in the 2006/7, 2008/9, 2009/10 and 2013/14 seasons, when influenza A(H1N1) and influenza B viruses predominated (Figs. 1 and 2, Table 3).


Deaths averted by influenza vaccination in the U.S. during the seasons 2005/06 through 2013/14.

Foppa IM, Cheng PY, Reynolds SB, Shay DK, Carias C, Bresee JS, Kim IK, Gambhir M, Fry AM - Vaccine (2015)

The median number of deaths associated with influenza (excess mortality = EM) and the indicators for influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), A(H1N1) pdm09 and B viruses, October, 2005 through July, 2014.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834450&req=5

Figure 2: The median number of deaths associated with influenza (excess mortality = EM) and the indicators for influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), A(H1N1) pdm09 and B viruses, October, 2005 through July, 2014.
Mentions: During the study period, the highest numbers of deaths associated with influenza occurred during the season 2012/13, followed by 2007/8 and 2010/11 (Table 3). Each of these three seasons were dominated by circulation of influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B viruses (Fig. 1). There were relatively few influenza-associated excess deaths in the 2006/7, 2008/9, 2009/10 and 2013/14 seasons, when influenza A(H1N1) and influenza B viruses predominated (Figs. 1 and 2, Table 3).

Bottom Line: We found that of all studied seasons the most deaths were averted by influenza vaccination during the 2012/13 season (9398; 95% CI 2,386 to 19,897) and the fewest during the 2009/10 pandemic (222; 95% CI 79 to 347).Of all influenza-associated deaths averted, 88.9% (95% CI 83 to 92.5%) were in people ≥65 yrs. old.The estimated number of deaths averted by the US annual influenza vaccination program is considerable, especially among elderly adults and even when vaccine effectiveness is modest, such as in the 2012/13 season.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Influenza Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS A-20, Atlanta, 30333 GA, USA; Battelle Memorial Institute, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: vor1@cdc.gov.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus