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Posttraining Epinephrine Reverses Memory Deficits Produced by Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

Lorón-Sánchez A, Torras-Garcia M, Coll-Andreu M, Costa-Miserachs D, Portell-Cortés I - Scientifica (Cairo) (2016)

Bottom Line: Retention was tested 3 h and 24 h after acquisition.Systemic administration of distilled water also had an enhancing effect, but of a lower magnitude.These data indicate that posttraining epinephrine and, to a lesser extent, vehicle injection reduce memory deficits associated with TBI, probably through induction of a low-to-moderate emotional arousal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departament de Psicobiologia i de Metodologia de les Ciències de la Salut, Institut de Neurociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici B, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this research is to evaluate whether posttraining systemic epinephrine is able to improve object recognition memory in rats with memory deficits produced by traumatic brain injury. Forty-nine two-month-old naïve male Wistar rats were submitted to surgical procedures to induce traumatic brain injury (TBI) or were sham-operated. Rats were trained in an object recognition task and, immediately after training, received an intraperitoneal injection of distilled water (Sham-Veh and TBI-Veh group) or 0.01 mg/kg epinephrine (TBI-Epi group) or no injection (TBI-0 and Sham-0 groups). Retention was tested 3 h and 24 h after acquisition. The results showed that brain injury produced severe memory deficits and that posttraining administration of epinephrine was able to reverse them. Systemic administration of distilled water also had an enhancing effect, but of a lower magnitude. These data indicate that posttraining epinephrine and, to a lesser extent, vehicle injection reduce memory deficits associated with TBI, probably through induction of a low-to-moderate emotional arousal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean value (+SEM) of the discrimination index at 3 h and 24 h retention tests. ∗: statistically significant differences compared to zero; ○: statistically significant differences between groups.
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fig2: Mean value (+SEM) of the discrimination index at 3 h and 24 h retention tests. ∗: statistically significant differences compared to zero; ○: statistically significant differences between groups.

Mentions: t-tests showed that the discrimination index in RT1 was significantly different from zero (indicating a significant recall) in Sham-0 (t8 = 8.42, P < 0.001), Sham-Veh (t6 = 4.24, P = 0.005), and TBI-Epi (t6 = 6.72, P = 0.001) groups and did not differ from 0 (indicating lack of recall) in TBI-0 and TBI-Veh groups. In RT2, the discrimination index was significantly different from zero in all groups except for TBI-0 group (Sham-0: t8 = 4.5, P = 0.002; Sham-Veh: t6 = 13.2, P < 0.001; TBI-Veh: t9 = 3.25, P = 0.010; and TBI-Epi: t6 = 10, P < 0.001). Therefore, whereas TBI-0 did not remember the familiar object on RT1 and RT2 and TBI-Veh on RT1, TBI-Epi and Sham groups remember it on both retention sessions (Figure 2).


Posttraining Epinephrine Reverses Memory Deficits Produced by Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

Lorón-Sánchez A, Torras-Garcia M, Coll-Andreu M, Costa-Miserachs D, Portell-Cortés I - Scientifica (Cairo) (2016)

Mean value (+SEM) of the discrimination index at 3 h and 24 h retention tests. ∗: statistically significant differences compared to zero; ○: statistically significant differences between groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834408&req=5

fig2: Mean value (+SEM) of the discrimination index at 3 h and 24 h retention tests. ∗: statistically significant differences compared to zero; ○: statistically significant differences between groups.
Mentions: t-tests showed that the discrimination index in RT1 was significantly different from zero (indicating a significant recall) in Sham-0 (t8 = 8.42, P < 0.001), Sham-Veh (t6 = 4.24, P = 0.005), and TBI-Epi (t6 = 6.72, P = 0.001) groups and did not differ from 0 (indicating lack of recall) in TBI-0 and TBI-Veh groups. In RT2, the discrimination index was significantly different from zero in all groups except for TBI-0 group (Sham-0: t8 = 4.5, P = 0.002; Sham-Veh: t6 = 13.2, P < 0.001; TBI-Veh: t9 = 3.25, P = 0.010; and TBI-Epi: t6 = 10, P < 0.001). Therefore, whereas TBI-0 did not remember the familiar object on RT1 and RT2 and TBI-Veh on RT1, TBI-Epi and Sham groups remember it on both retention sessions (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Retention was tested 3 h and 24 h after acquisition.Systemic administration of distilled water also had an enhancing effect, but of a lower magnitude.These data indicate that posttraining epinephrine and, to a lesser extent, vehicle injection reduce memory deficits associated with TBI, probably through induction of a low-to-moderate emotional arousal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departament de Psicobiologia i de Metodologia de les Ciències de la Salut, Institut de Neurociències, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Edifici B, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this research is to evaluate whether posttraining systemic epinephrine is able to improve object recognition memory in rats with memory deficits produced by traumatic brain injury. Forty-nine two-month-old naïve male Wistar rats were submitted to surgical procedures to induce traumatic brain injury (TBI) or were sham-operated. Rats were trained in an object recognition task and, immediately after training, received an intraperitoneal injection of distilled water (Sham-Veh and TBI-Veh group) or 0.01 mg/kg epinephrine (TBI-Epi group) or no injection (TBI-0 and Sham-0 groups). Retention was tested 3 h and 24 h after acquisition. The results showed that brain injury produced severe memory deficits and that posttraining administration of epinephrine was able to reverse them. Systemic administration of distilled water also had an enhancing effect, but of a lower magnitude. These data indicate that posttraining epinephrine and, to a lesser extent, vehicle injection reduce memory deficits associated with TBI, probably through induction of a low-to-moderate emotional arousal.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus