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Family-centered rounds and medical student performance on the NBME pediatrics subject (shelf) examination: a retrospective cohort study.

Kimbrough TN, Heh V, Wijesooriya NR, Ryan MS - Med Educ Online (2016)

Bottom Line: Average scores on PSE for years 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2014 were significantly higher than for SSE, but not significantly different for all other years.Our results showed no difference in PSE performance during a time in which our institution transitioned to FCR.These findings should be reassuring for students, attending physicians, and medical educators.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; Tiffany.kimbrough@vcuhealth.org.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the association between family-centered rounds (FCR) and medical student knowledge acquisition as assessed by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) pediatric subject (shelf) exam.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of third-year medical students who graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine between 2009 and 2014. This timeframe represented the transition from 'traditional' rounds to FCR on the pediatric inpatient unit. Data collected included demographics, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and 2 scores, and NBME subject examinations in pediatrics (PSE), medicine (MSE), and surgery (SSE).

Results: Eight hundred and sixteen participants were included in the analysis. Student performance on the PSE could not be statistically differentiated from performance on the MSE for any year except 2011 (z-score=-0.17, p=0.02). Average scores on PSE for years 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2014 were significantly higher than for SSE, but not significantly different for all other years. The PSE was highly correlated with USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 examinations (correlation range 0.56-0.77) for all years.

Conclusions: Our results showed no difference in PSE performance during a time in which our institution transitioned to FCR. These findings should be reassuring for students, attending physicians, and medical educators.

No MeSH data available.


NBME subject examination scores over time. The NBME scores are shown for the pediatric, medicine, and surgery subject examinations (PSE, MSE, and SSE) for the classes of medical students we studied, Class of 2009–2014, while our institution implemented family-centered rounds in inpatient pediatrics.
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Figure 0001: NBME subject examination scores over time. The NBME scores are shown for the pediatric, medicine, and surgery subject examinations (PSE, MSE, and SSE) for the classes of medical students we studied, Class of 2009–2014, while our institution implemented family-centered rounds in inpatient pediatrics.

Mentions: PSE was highly correlated with both MSE and SSE. Correlations between PSE and MSE during transitional and consistent adoption of FCR implementation were significant, p<0.001, with coefficients that ranged from 0.45 to 0.62. Highly significant correlations were also obtained between PSE and SSE with coefficients of 0.56–0.72, p<0.001 (Table 3). Figure 1 demonstrates the relationship between these examinations from year to year.


Family-centered rounds and medical student performance on the NBME pediatrics subject (shelf) examination: a retrospective cohort study.

Kimbrough TN, Heh V, Wijesooriya NR, Ryan MS - Med Educ Online (2016)

NBME subject examination scores over time. The NBME scores are shown for the pediatric, medicine, and surgery subject examinations (PSE, MSE, and SSE) for the classes of medical students we studied, Class of 2009–2014, while our institution implemented family-centered rounds in inpatient pediatrics.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834362&req=5

Figure 0001: NBME subject examination scores over time. The NBME scores are shown for the pediatric, medicine, and surgery subject examinations (PSE, MSE, and SSE) for the classes of medical students we studied, Class of 2009–2014, while our institution implemented family-centered rounds in inpatient pediatrics.
Mentions: PSE was highly correlated with both MSE and SSE. Correlations between PSE and MSE during transitional and consistent adoption of FCR implementation were significant, p<0.001, with coefficients that ranged from 0.45 to 0.62. Highly significant correlations were also obtained between PSE and SSE with coefficients of 0.56–0.72, p<0.001 (Table 3). Figure 1 demonstrates the relationship between these examinations from year to year.

Bottom Line: Average scores on PSE for years 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2014 were significantly higher than for SSE, but not significantly different for all other years.Our results showed no difference in PSE performance during a time in which our institution transitioned to FCR.These findings should be reassuring for students, attending physicians, and medical educators.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; Tiffany.kimbrough@vcuhealth.org.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the association between family-centered rounds (FCR) and medical student knowledge acquisition as assessed by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) pediatric subject (shelf) exam.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of third-year medical students who graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine between 2009 and 2014. This timeframe represented the transition from 'traditional' rounds to FCR on the pediatric inpatient unit. Data collected included demographics, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and 2 scores, and NBME subject examinations in pediatrics (PSE), medicine (MSE), and surgery (SSE).

Results: Eight hundred and sixteen participants were included in the analysis. Student performance on the PSE could not be statistically differentiated from performance on the MSE for any year except 2011 (z-score=-0.17, p=0.02). Average scores on PSE for years 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2014 were significantly higher than for SSE, but not significantly different for all other years. The PSE was highly correlated with USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 examinations (correlation range 0.56-0.77) for all years.

Conclusions: Our results showed no difference in PSE performance during a time in which our institution transitioned to FCR. These findings should be reassuring for students, attending physicians, and medical educators.

No MeSH data available.