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Body Odor Based Personality Judgments: The Effect of Fragranced Cosmetics.

Sorokowska A, Sorokowski P, Havlíček J - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Correlations between observers' ratings and self-rated neuroticism were stronger when raters assessed body odor in the natural body odor condition (natural BO condition; r s = 0.20) than in the cosmetics use condition (BO+cosmetics condition; r s = 0.15).Ratings of dominance significantly predicted self-assessed dominance in both conditions (r s = 0.34 for natural BO and r s = 0.21 for BO+cosmetics), whereas ratings of extraversion did not predict self-assessed extraversion in either condition.In addition, ratings of body odor attractiveness and pleasantness were significantly lower in natural BO condition than in BO+cosmetics condition, although the intensity of donors' body odors was similar under both conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Smell and Taste Clinic, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, TU DresdenDresden, Germany; Institute of Psychology, University of WroclawWroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
People can accurately assess various personality traits of others based on body odor (BO) alone. Previous studies have shown that correlations between odor ratings and self-assessed personality dimensions are evident for assessments of neuroticism and dominance. Here, we tested differences between assessments based on natural body odor alone, without the use of cosmetics and assessments based on the body odor of people who were allowed to use cosmetics following their daily routine. Sixty-seven observers assessed samples of odors from 113 odor donors (each odor donor provided two samples - one with and one without cosmetic use); the donors provided their personality ratings, and the raters judged personality characteristics of the donors based on the provided odor samples. Correlations between observers' ratings and self-rated neuroticism were stronger when raters assessed body odor in the natural body odor condition (natural BO condition; r s = 0.20) than in the cosmetics use condition (BO+cosmetics condition; r s = 0.15). Ratings of dominance significantly predicted self-assessed dominance in both conditions (r s = 0.34 for natural BO and r s = 0.21 for BO+cosmetics), whereas ratings of extraversion did not predict self-assessed extraversion in either condition. In addition, ratings of body odor attractiveness and pleasantness were significantly lower in natural BO condition than in BO+cosmetics condition, although the intensity of donors' body odors was similar under both conditions. Our findings suggest that although olfaction seems to contribute to accurate first impression judgments of certain personality traits, cosmetic use can affect assessments of others based on body odor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ratings of intensity, pleasantness, and attractiveness of body odor in the natural and cosmetics use conditions. Significant p < 0.001 is marked by ∗∗.
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Figure 1: Ratings of intensity, pleasantness, and attractiveness of body odor in the natural and cosmetics use conditions. Significant p < 0.001 is marked by ∗∗.

Mentions: We also found a significant effect of condition (see Figure 1). Body odor samples in the BO+cosmetics condition were assessed as more pleasant [F(1,106) = 19.1, p< 0.0001; = 0.15] and more attractive [F(1,107) = 13.4, p < 0.001, = 0.11] than were natural body odors, but there was no difference between the conditions in ratings of odor intensity (F(1,107) = 2.7, p = 0.10; = 0.02).


Body Odor Based Personality Judgments: The Effect of Fragranced Cosmetics.

Sorokowska A, Sorokowski P, Havlíček J - Front Psychol (2016)

Ratings of intensity, pleasantness, and attractiveness of body odor in the natural and cosmetics use conditions. Significant p < 0.001 is marked by ∗∗.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834355&req=5

Figure 1: Ratings of intensity, pleasantness, and attractiveness of body odor in the natural and cosmetics use conditions. Significant p < 0.001 is marked by ∗∗.
Mentions: We also found a significant effect of condition (see Figure 1). Body odor samples in the BO+cosmetics condition were assessed as more pleasant [F(1,106) = 19.1, p< 0.0001; = 0.15] and more attractive [F(1,107) = 13.4, p < 0.001, = 0.11] than were natural body odors, but there was no difference between the conditions in ratings of odor intensity (F(1,107) = 2.7, p = 0.10; = 0.02).

Bottom Line: Correlations between observers' ratings and self-rated neuroticism were stronger when raters assessed body odor in the natural body odor condition (natural BO condition; r s = 0.20) than in the cosmetics use condition (BO+cosmetics condition; r s = 0.15).Ratings of dominance significantly predicted self-assessed dominance in both conditions (r s = 0.34 for natural BO and r s = 0.21 for BO+cosmetics), whereas ratings of extraversion did not predict self-assessed extraversion in either condition.In addition, ratings of body odor attractiveness and pleasantness were significantly lower in natural BO condition than in BO+cosmetics condition, although the intensity of donors' body odors was similar under both conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Smell and Taste Clinic, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, TU DresdenDresden, Germany; Institute of Psychology, University of WroclawWroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
People can accurately assess various personality traits of others based on body odor (BO) alone. Previous studies have shown that correlations between odor ratings and self-assessed personality dimensions are evident for assessments of neuroticism and dominance. Here, we tested differences between assessments based on natural body odor alone, without the use of cosmetics and assessments based on the body odor of people who were allowed to use cosmetics following their daily routine. Sixty-seven observers assessed samples of odors from 113 odor donors (each odor donor provided two samples - one with and one without cosmetic use); the donors provided their personality ratings, and the raters judged personality characteristics of the donors based on the provided odor samples. Correlations between observers' ratings and self-rated neuroticism were stronger when raters assessed body odor in the natural body odor condition (natural BO condition; r s = 0.20) than in the cosmetics use condition (BO+cosmetics condition; r s = 0.15). Ratings of dominance significantly predicted self-assessed dominance in both conditions (r s = 0.34 for natural BO and r s = 0.21 for BO+cosmetics), whereas ratings of extraversion did not predict self-assessed extraversion in either condition. In addition, ratings of body odor attractiveness and pleasantness were significantly lower in natural BO condition than in BO+cosmetics condition, although the intensity of donors' body odors was similar under both conditions. Our findings suggest that although olfaction seems to contribute to accurate first impression judgments of certain personality traits, cosmetic use can affect assessments of others based on body odor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus