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Multimodal Imaging Signatures of Parkinson's Disease.

Bowman FD, Drake DF, Huddleston DE - Front Neurosci (2016)

Bottom Line: Our approach builds on elastic net, performing regularization and variable selection, while introducing additional criteria centering on parsimony and reproducibility.We apply our method to data from 42 subjects (28 PD patients and 14 HC).Our approach demonstrates extremely high accuracy, assessed via cross-validation, and isolates brain regions that are implicated in the neurodegenerative PD process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, The Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that manifests through hallmark motor symptoms, often accompanied by a range of non-motor symptoms. There is a putative delay between the onset of the neurodegenerative process, marked by the death of dopamine-producing cells, and the onset of motor symptoms, creating an urgent need to develop biomarkers that may yield early PD detection. Neuroimaging offers a non-invasive approach to examining the potential utility of a vast number of functional and structural brain characteristics as biomarkers. We present a statistical framework for analyzing neuroimaging data from multiple modalities to determine features that reliably distinguish PD patients from healthy control (HC) subjects. Our approach builds on elastic net, performing regularization and variable selection, while introducing additional criteria centering on parsimony and reproducibility. We apply our method to data from 42 subjects (28 PD patients and 14 HC). Our approach demonstrates extremely high accuracy, assessed via cross-validation, and isolates brain regions that are implicated in the neurodegenerative PD process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Characterization of the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease neurodegeneration (green and yellow), which persists through the commencement of motor symptoms (orange) and ultimately clinical diagnosis and beyond (red).
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Figure 1: Characterization of the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease neurodegeneration (green and yellow), which persists through the commencement of motor symptoms (orange) and ultimately clinical diagnosis and beyond (red).

Mentions: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating, progressive movement disorder affecting 7–10 million individuals worldwide (Parkinson's Disease Foundation, 2015). PD usually affects people over 50 years of age, but a subset of patients experience early onset. The hallmark pathology of PD is the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), but the disease manifests with a diversity of symptoms referable to multi-system neuropathology. The clinical features of PD include the classic motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait impairment, as well as a host of non-motor symptoms (Kalia and Lang, 2015). At the time of PD diagnosis it has been estimated based on histopathology that over 50% of dopamine neurons in the SNpc have died (Fearnley and Lees, 1991). Braak et al. (2003) posit a process of phased pathology of PD, which suggests that early neurodegeneration occurs in lower brainstem structures and progresses in ascending fashion, in particular affecting the locus coeruleus in Stage II and SNpc in Stage III. Further progression extends to higher-level sensory association areas and prefrontal cortical regions, eventually impacting first order sensory association areas, premotor regions, and primary sensory and motor fields (Del Tredici and Braak, 2013). The putative delay in the onset of motor symptoms leading to PD diagnosis is portrayed in Figure 1, and the corresponding neurodegeneration occurring throughout this pre-motor period represents a missed opportunity for early therapeutic intervention that may significantly slow or halt the progression of PD related decline.


Multimodal Imaging Signatures of Parkinson's Disease.

Bowman FD, Drake DF, Huddleston DE - Front Neurosci (2016)

Characterization of the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease neurodegeneration (green and yellow), which persists through the commencement of motor symptoms (orange) and ultimately clinical diagnosis and beyond (red).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834347&req=5

Figure 1: Characterization of the onset and progression of Parkinson's disease neurodegeneration (green and yellow), which persists through the commencement of motor symptoms (orange) and ultimately clinical diagnosis and beyond (red).
Mentions: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating, progressive movement disorder affecting 7–10 million individuals worldwide (Parkinson's Disease Foundation, 2015). PD usually affects people over 50 years of age, but a subset of patients experience early onset. The hallmark pathology of PD is the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), but the disease manifests with a diversity of symptoms referable to multi-system neuropathology. The clinical features of PD include the classic motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and gait impairment, as well as a host of non-motor symptoms (Kalia and Lang, 2015). At the time of PD diagnosis it has been estimated based on histopathology that over 50% of dopamine neurons in the SNpc have died (Fearnley and Lees, 1991). Braak et al. (2003) posit a process of phased pathology of PD, which suggests that early neurodegeneration occurs in lower brainstem structures and progresses in ascending fashion, in particular affecting the locus coeruleus in Stage II and SNpc in Stage III. Further progression extends to higher-level sensory association areas and prefrontal cortical regions, eventually impacting first order sensory association areas, premotor regions, and primary sensory and motor fields (Del Tredici and Braak, 2013). The putative delay in the onset of motor symptoms leading to PD diagnosis is portrayed in Figure 1, and the corresponding neurodegeneration occurring throughout this pre-motor period represents a missed opportunity for early therapeutic intervention that may significantly slow or halt the progression of PD related decline.

Bottom Line: Our approach builds on elastic net, performing regularization and variable selection, while introducing additional criteria centering on parsimony and reproducibility.We apply our method to data from 42 subjects (28 PD patients and 14 HC).Our approach demonstrates extremely high accuracy, assessed via cross-validation, and isolates brain regions that are implicated in the neurodegenerative PD process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, The Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University New York, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder that manifests through hallmark motor symptoms, often accompanied by a range of non-motor symptoms. There is a putative delay between the onset of the neurodegenerative process, marked by the death of dopamine-producing cells, and the onset of motor symptoms, creating an urgent need to develop biomarkers that may yield early PD detection. Neuroimaging offers a non-invasive approach to examining the potential utility of a vast number of functional and structural brain characteristics as biomarkers. We present a statistical framework for analyzing neuroimaging data from multiple modalities to determine features that reliably distinguish PD patients from healthy control (HC) subjects. Our approach builds on elastic net, performing regularization and variable selection, while introducing additional criteria centering on parsimony and reproducibility. We apply our method to data from 42 subjects (28 PD patients and 14 HC). Our approach demonstrates extremely high accuracy, assessed via cross-validation, and isolates brain regions that are implicated in the neurodegenerative PD process.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus