Limits...
Twelve years of repeated wild hog activity promotes population maintenance of an invasive clonal plant in a coastal dune ecosystem.

Oldfield CA, Evans JP - Ecol Evol (2016)

Bottom Line: Using generalized linear mixed models, we tested the effect of wild hog disturbance on permanent sites for yellow nutsedge culm density, tuber density, and percent cover of native plant species over a 12-year period.We found that disturbance plots had a higher number of culms and tubers and a lower percentage of native live plant cover than undisturbed control plots.Opportunistic facultative interactions such as we demonstrate in this study are likely to become more commonplace as greater numbers of introduced species are integrated into ecological communities around the world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology The University of the South Sewanee Tennessee 37383.

ABSTRACT
Invasive animals can facilitate the success of invasive plant populations through disturbance. We examined the relationship between the repeated foraging disturbance of an invasive animal and the population maintenance of an invasive plant in a coastal dune ecosystem. We hypothesized that feral wild hog (Sus scrofa) populations repeatedly utilized tubers of the clonal perennial, yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) as a food source and evaluated whether hog activity promoted the long-term maintenance of yellow nutsedge populations on St. Catherine's Island, Georgia, United States. Using generalized linear mixed models, we tested the effect of wild hog disturbance on permanent sites for yellow nutsedge culm density, tuber density, and percent cover of native plant species over a 12-year period. We found that disturbance plots had a higher number of culms and tubers and a lower percentage of native live plant cover than undisturbed control plots. Wild hogs redisturbed the disturbed plots approximately every 5 years. Our research provides demographic evidence that repeated foraging disturbances by an invasive animal promote the long-term population maintenance of an invasive clonal plant. Opportunistic facultative interactions such as we demonstrate in this study are likely to become more commonplace as greater numbers of introduced species are integrated into ecological communities around the world.

No MeSH data available.


Mean number of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) culms (A), mean yellow nutsedge tuber density (B), and mean percent native cover (C) ± SE per 0.1 m2 of undisturbed and disturbed plots at McQueen's Inlet. U represents undisturbed control plots, and D represents disturbed plots.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834338&req=5

ece32045-fig-0001: Mean number of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) culms (A), mean yellow nutsedge tuber density (B), and mean percent native cover (C) ± SE per 0.1 m2 of undisturbed and disturbed plots at McQueen's Inlet. U represents undisturbed control plots, and D represents disturbed plots.

Mentions: After controlling for the effects of replicate and site, we found significantly more yellow nutsedge culms in the disturbed plots compared to the undisturbed. On average, disturbed sites had 3.6 more culms than undisturbed sites (95% CI: 2.25–4.93; t‐value: 5.26, residual df = 73, P < 0.001). No variation associated with year was detected (t‐value: 2.20, residual df = 73, P = 0.028; Figs. 1a and 2a).


Twelve years of repeated wild hog activity promotes population maintenance of an invasive clonal plant in a coastal dune ecosystem.

Oldfield CA, Evans JP - Ecol Evol (2016)

Mean number of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) culms (A), mean yellow nutsedge tuber density (B), and mean percent native cover (C) ± SE per 0.1 m2 of undisturbed and disturbed plots at McQueen's Inlet. U represents undisturbed control plots, and D represents disturbed plots.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4834338&req=5

ece32045-fig-0001: Mean number of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) culms (A), mean yellow nutsedge tuber density (B), and mean percent native cover (C) ± SE per 0.1 m2 of undisturbed and disturbed plots at McQueen's Inlet. U represents undisturbed control plots, and D represents disturbed plots.
Mentions: After controlling for the effects of replicate and site, we found significantly more yellow nutsedge culms in the disturbed plots compared to the undisturbed. On average, disturbed sites had 3.6 more culms than undisturbed sites (95% CI: 2.25–4.93; t‐value: 5.26, residual df = 73, P < 0.001). No variation associated with year was detected (t‐value: 2.20, residual df = 73, P = 0.028; Figs. 1a and 2a).

Bottom Line: Using generalized linear mixed models, we tested the effect of wild hog disturbance on permanent sites for yellow nutsedge culm density, tuber density, and percent cover of native plant species over a 12-year period.We found that disturbance plots had a higher number of culms and tubers and a lower percentage of native live plant cover than undisturbed control plots.Opportunistic facultative interactions such as we demonstrate in this study are likely to become more commonplace as greater numbers of introduced species are integrated into ecological communities around the world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology The University of the South Sewanee Tennessee 37383.

ABSTRACT
Invasive animals can facilitate the success of invasive plant populations through disturbance. We examined the relationship between the repeated foraging disturbance of an invasive animal and the population maintenance of an invasive plant in a coastal dune ecosystem. We hypothesized that feral wild hog (Sus scrofa) populations repeatedly utilized tubers of the clonal perennial, yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus) as a food source and evaluated whether hog activity promoted the long-term maintenance of yellow nutsedge populations on St. Catherine's Island, Georgia, United States. Using generalized linear mixed models, we tested the effect of wild hog disturbance on permanent sites for yellow nutsedge culm density, tuber density, and percent cover of native plant species over a 12-year period. We found that disturbance plots had a higher number of culms and tubers and a lower percentage of native live plant cover than undisturbed control plots. Wild hogs redisturbed the disturbed plots approximately every 5 years. Our research provides demographic evidence that repeated foraging disturbances by an invasive animal promote the long-term population maintenance of an invasive clonal plant. Opportunistic facultative interactions such as we demonstrate in this study are likely to become more commonplace as greater numbers of introduced species are integrated into ecological communities around the world.

No MeSH data available.