Limits...
Systematics and biology of some species of Micrurapteryx Spuler (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) from the Holarctic Region, with re-description of M. caraganella (Hering) from Siberia.

Kirichenko N, Triberti P, Mutanen M, Magnoux E, Landry JF, Lopez-Vaamonde C - Zookeys (2016)

Bottom Line: In addition, based on both morphological and molecular evidence as well as examination of type specimens, the North American Parectopa occulta Braun, 1922 and Parectopa albicostella Braun, 1925 are transferred to Micrurapteryx as Micrurapteryx occulta (Braun, 1922), comb. n. with albicostella as its junior synonym (syn. n.).Characters used to distinguish Micrurapteryx from Parectopa are presented and illustrated.These findings provide another example of the potential of DNA barcoding to reveal overlooked species and illuminate nomenclatural problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Sukachev Institute of Forest SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50/28, 660036, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; Siberian Federal University, 79 Svobodny pr., 660041, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; INRA, UR0633 Zoologie Forestière, F-45075 Orléans, France.

ABSTRACT
During a DNA barcoding campaign of leaf-mining insects from Siberia, a genetically divergent lineage of a gracillariid belonging to the genus Micrurapteryx was discovered, whose larvae developed on Caragana Fabr. and Medicago L. (Fabaceae). Specimens from Siberia showed similar external morphology to the Palearctic Micrurapteryx gradatella and the Nearctic Parectopa occulta but differed in male genitalia, DNA barcodes, and nuclear genes histone H3 and 28S. Members of this lineage are re-described here as Micrurapteryx caraganella (Hering, 1957), comb. n., an available name published with only a brief description of its larva and leaf mine. Micrurapteryx caraganella is widely distributed throughout Siberia, from Tyumen oblast in the West to Transbaikalia in the East. Occasionally it may severely affect its main host, Caragana arborescens Lam. This species has been confused in the past with Micrurapteryx gradatella in Siberia, but field observations confirm that Micrurapteryx gradatella exists in Siberia and is sympatric with Micrurapteryx caraganella, at least in the Krasnoyarsk region, where it feeds on different host plants (Vicia amoena Fisch. and Vicia sp.). In addition, based on both morphological and molecular evidence as well as examination of type specimens, the North American Parectopa occulta Braun, 1922 and Parectopa albicostella Braun, 1925 are transferred to Micrurapteryx as Micrurapteryx occulta (Braun, 1922), comb. n. with albicostella as its junior synonym (syn. n.). Characters used to distinguish Micrurapteryx from Parectopa are presented and illustrated. These findings provide another example of the potential of DNA barcoding to reveal overlooked species and illuminate nomenclatural problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of female genitalia and phallus of Micrurapteryx vs Parectopa; lateral aspect with ventral side oriented downward. 83Micrurapteryxocculta, lateral aspect (slide MIC7562, specimen BIOUG16843-E04) (Canada, Yukon, Ivvavik National Park) 84Parectoparobiniella, lateral aspect (slide MIC6973, specimen CNCLEP00083022) (USA, Maryland) 85Micrurapteryxocculta, ventral aspect (slide MIC6903, specimen CNCLEP00117698) (Canada, British Columbia) 86Parectoparobiniella, ventral aspect (slide MIC6907, specimen CNCLEP00121057) (Canada, Nova Scotia, Smiths Cove). Scale bars: 500 µm.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829971&req=5

Figure 19: Comparison of female genitalia and phallus of Micrurapteryx vs Parectopa; lateral aspect with ventral side oriented downward. 83Micrurapteryxocculta, lateral aspect (slide MIC7562, specimen BIOUG16843-E04) (Canada, Yukon, Ivvavik National Park) 84Parectoparobiniella, lateral aspect (slide MIC6973, specimen CNCLEP00083022) (USA, Maryland) 85Micrurapteryxocculta, ventral aspect (slide MIC6903, specimen CNCLEP00117698) (Canada, British Columbia) 86Parectoparobiniella, ventral aspect (slide MIC6907, specimen CNCLEP00121057) (Canada, Nova Scotia, Smiths Cove). Scale bars: 500 µm.

Mentions: In addition to DNA barcodes that cluster species into different sets of BINs and segregated Micrurapteryx from Parectopa, we noted several morphological characters not formulated by previous authors that distinguish the two genera from each other (Figs 77–86). These character states are likely mixtures of apomorphies and plesiomorphies. Without a phylogenetic framework for the genera of Gracillariinae and a more comprehensive mapping of characters across genera, it remains premature to assign character polarities and apomorphies that would support either the monophyly of each genus, or whether Micrurapteryx and Parectopa form a single monophyletic clade and should be combined. However, the differences are compelling enough to support the proposed new combinations. Provisional diagnoses for each genus follow. The characters presented are not meant to be exhaustive. We focused on abdominal and genital characters, and did not examine wing venation nor other skeletal features. We did not conduct a comprehensive survey of all the species currently attributed to each genus. However, the character states given here were present in all those examined (listed in Table 1 and Suppl. material 1: Table S2).


Systematics and biology of some species of Micrurapteryx Spuler (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) from the Holarctic Region, with re-description of M. caraganella (Hering) from Siberia.

Kirichenko N, Triberti P, Mutanen M, Magnoux E, Landry JF, Lopez-Vaamonde C - Zookeys (2016)

Comparison of female genitalia and phallus of Micrurapteryx vs Parectopa; lateral aspect with ventral side oriented downward. 83Micrurapteryxocculta, lateral aspect (slide MIC7562, specimen BIOUG16843-E04) (Canada, Yukon, Ivvavik National Park) 84Parectoparobiniella, lateral aspect (slide MIC6973, specimen CNCLEP00083022) (USA, Maryland) 85Micrurapteryxocculta, ventral aspect (slide MIC6903, specimen CNCLEP00117698) (Canada, British Columbia) 86Parectoparobiniella, ventral aspect (slide MIC6907, specimen CNCLEP00121057) (Canada, Nova Scotia, Smiths Cove). Scale bars: 500 µm.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829971&req=5

Figure 19: Comparison of female genitalia and phallus of Micrurapteryx vs Parectopa; lateral aspect with ventral side oriented downward. 83Micrurapteryxocculta, lateral aspect (slide MIC7562, specimen BIOUG16843-E04) (Canada, Yukon, Ivvavik National Park) 84Parectoparobiniella, lateral aspect (slide MIC6973, specimen CNCLEP00083022) (USA, Maryland) 85Micrurapteryxocculta, ventral aspect (slide MIC6903, specimen CNCLEP00117698) (Canada, British Columbia) 86Parectoparobiniella, ventral aspect (slide MIC6907, specimen CNCLEP00121057) (Canada, Nova Scotia, Smiths Cove). Scale bars: 500 µm.
Mentions: In addition to DNA barcodes that cluster species into different sets of BINs and segregated Micrurapteryx from Parectopa, we noted several morphological characters not formulated by previous authors that distinguish the two genera from each other (Figs 77–86). These character states are likely mixtures of apomorphies and plesiomorphies. Without a phylogenetic framework for the genera of Gracillariinae and a more comprehensive mapping of characters across genera, it remains premature to assign character polarities and apomorphies that would support either the monophyly of each genus, or whether Micrurapteryx and Parectopa form a single monophyletic clade and should be combined. However, the differences are compelling enough to support the proposed new combinations. Provisional diagnoses for each genus follow. The characters presented are not meant to be exhaustive. We focused on abdominal and genital characters, and did not examine wing venation nor other skeletal features. We did not conduct a comprehensive survey of all the species currently attributed to each genus. However, the character states given here were present in all those examined (listed in Table 1 and Suppl. material 1: Table S2).

Bottom Line: In addition, based on both morphological and molecular evidence as well as examination of type specimens, the North American Parectopa occulta Braun, 1922 and Parectopa albicostella Braun, 1925 are transferred to Micrurapteryx as Micrurapteryx occulta (Braun, 1922), comb. n. with albicostella as its junior synonym (syn. n.).Characters used to distinguish Micrurapteryx from Parectopa are presented and illustrated.These findings provide another example of the potential of DNA barcoding to reveal overlooked species and illuminate nomenclatural problems.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Sukachev Institute of Forest SB RAS, Akademgorodok 50/28, 660036, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; Siberian Federal University, 79 Svobodny pr., 660041, Krasnoyarsk, Russia; INRA, UR0633 Zoologie Forestière, F-45075 Orléans, France.

ABSTRACT
During a DNA barcoding campaign of leaf-mining insects from Siberia, a genetically divergent lineage of a gracillariid belonging to the genus Micrurapteryx was discovered, whose larvae developed on Caragana Fabr. and Medicago L. (Fabaceae). Specimens from Siberia showed similar external morphology to the Palearctic Micrurapteryx gradatella and the Nearctic Parectopa occulta but differed in male genitalia, DNA barcodes, and nuclear genes histone H3 and 28S. Members of this lineage are re-described here as Micrurapteryx caraganella (Hering, 1957), comb. n., an available name published with only a brief description of its larva and leaf mine. Micrurapteryx caraganella is widely distributed throughout Siberia, from Tyumen oblast in the West to Transbaikalia in the East. Occasionally it may severely affect its main host, Caragana arborescens Lam. This species has been confused in the past with Micrurapteryx gradatella in Siberia, but field observations confirm that Micrurapteryx gradatella exists in Siberia and is sympatric with Micrurapteryx caraganella, at least in the Krasnoyarsk region, where it feeds on different host plants (Vicia amoena Fisch. and Vicia sp.). In addition, based on both morphological and molecular evidence as well as examination of type specimens, the North American Parectopa occulta Braun, 1922 and Parectopa albicostella Braun, 1925 are transferred to Micrurapteryx as Micrurapteryx occulta (Braun, 1922), comb. n. with albicostella as its junior synonym (syn. n.). Characters used to distinguish Micrurapteryx from Parectopa are presented and illustrated. These findings provide another example of the potential of DNA barcoding to reveal overlooked species and illuminate nomenclatural problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus