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Phylogenetic analysis of the Australian trans-Bass Strait millipede genus Pogonosternum (Carl, 1912) (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae) indicates multiple glacial refugia in southeastern Australia.

Decker P - Zookeys (2016)

Bottom Line: Pogonosternum coniferum (Jeekel, 1965) specimens cluster within Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum.Most of these five species groups exhibit a pattern of high intraspecific genetic variability and highly localized haplotypes, suggesting that they were confined to multiple Pleistocene refugia on the southeastern Australian mainland.The phylogenetic data also show that northwestern Tasmania was colonized by Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum, probably from central Victoria, and northeastern Tasmania by an as yet undescribed species from eastern Victoria.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, Am Museum 1, 02826 Görlitz, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This study documents the first detailed phylogenetic analysis of an Australian paradoxosomatid millipede genus. Two mitochondrial genes (partial COI and 16S) as well as partial nuclear 28S rDNA were amplified and sequenced for 41 individuals of the southeastern Australian genus Pogonosternum Jeekel, 1965. The analysis indicates that five species groups of Pogonosternum occur across New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania: Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum (Carl, 1912), Pogonosternum adrianae Jeekel, 1982, Pogonosternum laetificum Jeekel, 1982 and two undescribed species. Pogonosternum coniferum (Jeekel, 1965) specimens cluster within Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum. Most of these five species groups exhibit a pattern of high intraspecific genetic variability and highly localized haplotypes, suggesting that they were confined to multiple Pleistocene refugia on the southeastern Australian mainland. The phylogenetic data also show that northwestern Tasmania was colonized by Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum, probably from central Victoria, and northeastern Tasmania by an as yet undescribed species from eastern Victoria.

No MeSH data available.


Maximum likelihood tree for the nuclear 28S dataset, 1000 bootstrap replicates, values below 70 not shown.
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Figure 3: Maximum likelihood tree for the nuclear 28S dataset, 1000 bootstrap replicates, values below 70 not shown.

Mentions: A phylogenetic hypothesis was inferred for COI+16S and 28S by using the maximum likelihood method conducted in MEGA6 (Tamura et al. 2011). The phylogenetic tree with the highest log likelihood (COI+16S: -7237.4280; 28S: -1831.9238) is shown (Figs 2, 3). Initial trees for the heuristic search were obtained by applying the neighbor-joining method to a matrix of pairwise distances estimated using the


Phylogenetic analysis of the Australian trans-Bass Strait millipede genus Pogonosternum (Carl, 1912) (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae) indicates multiple glacial refugia in southeastern Australia.

Decker P - Zookeys (2016)

Maximum likelihood tree for the nuclear 28S dataset, 1000 bootstrap replicates, values below 70 not shown.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829959&req=5

Figure 3: Maximum likelihood tree for the nuclear 28S dataset, 1000 bootstrap replicates, values below 70 not shown.
Mentions: A phylogenetic hypothesis was inferred for COI+16S and 28S by using the maximum likelihood method conducted in MEGA6 (Tamura et al. 2011). The phylogenetic tree with the highest log likelihood (COI+16S: -7237.4280; 28S: -1831.9238) is shown (Figs 2, 3). Initial trees for the heuristic search were obtained by applying the neighbor-joining method to a matrix of pairwise distances estimated using the

Bottom Line: Pogonosternum coniferum (Jeekel, 1965) specimens cluster within Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum.Most of these five species groups exhibit a pattern of high intraspecific genetic variability and highly localized haplotypes, suggesting that they were confined to multiple Pleistocene refugia on the southeastern Australian mainland.The phylogenetic data also show that northwestern Tasmania was colonized by Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum, probably from central Victoria, and northeastern Tasmania by an as yet undescribed species from eastern Victoria.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Senckenberg Museum of Natural History Görlitz, Am Museum 1, 02826 Görlitz, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This study documents the first detailed phylogenetic analysis of an Australian paradoxosomatid millipede genus. Two mitochondrial genes (partial COI and 16S) as well as partial nuclear 28S rDNA were amplified and sequenced for 41 individuals of the southeastern Australian genus Pogonosternum Jeekel, 1965. The analysis indicates that five species groups of Pogonosternum occur across New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania: Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum (Carl, 1912), Pogonosternum adrianae Jeekel, 1982, Pogonosternum laetificum Jeekel, 1982 and two undescribed species. Pogonosternum coniferum (Jeekel, 1965) specimens cluster within Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum. Most of these five species groups exhibit a pattern of high intraspecific genetic variability and highly localized haplotypes, suggesting that they were confined to multiple Pleistocene refugia on the southeastern Australian mainland. The phylogenetic data also show that northwestern Tasmania was colonized by Pogonosternum nigrovirgatum, probably from central Victoria, and northeastern Tasmania by an as yet undescribed species from eastern Victoria.

No MeSH data available.