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Identification of pesticide varieties by testing microalgae using Visible/Near Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging technology.

Shao Y, Jiang L, Zhou H, Pan J, He Y - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: In our study, the feasibility of using visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging technology to detect the changes of the internal components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa so as to determine the varieties of pesticides (such as butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) at three concentrations (0.6 mg/L, 3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) was investigated.The RC-LDA model, which achieved an average correct classification rate of 97.0% was more superior than FW-PLSDA (72.2%) and CARS-PLSDA (84.0%), and it proved that visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging could be a rapid and reliable technique to identify pesticide varieties.It also proved that microalgae can be a very promising medium to indicate characteristics of pesticides.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.

ABSTRACT
In our study, the feasibility of using visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging technology to detect the changes of the internal components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa so as to determine the varieties of pesticides (such as butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) at three concentrations (0.6 mg/L, 3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) was investigated. Three models (partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with full wavelengths, FW-PLSDA; partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with competitive adaptive reweighted sampling algorithm, CARS-PLSDA; linear discrimination analysis combined with regression coefficients, RC-LDA) were built by the hyperspectral data of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to find which model can produce the most optimal result. The RC-LDA model, which achieved an average correct classification rate of 97.0% was more superior than FW-PLSDA (72.2%) and CARS-PLSDA (84.0%), and it proved that visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging could be a rapid and reliable technique to identify pesticide varieties. It also proved that microalgae can be a very promising medium to indicate characteristics of pesticides.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dynamic changes of chlorophyll a of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured in media with pesticides (butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) of three concentrations (a–c) and water from day 0 to day 5. (a) 0.6 mg/L; (b) 3 mg/L; (c) 15 mg/L.
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f1: Dynamic changes of chlorophyll a of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured in media with pesticides (butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) of three concentrations (a–c) and water from day 0 to day 5. (a) 0.6 mg/L; (b) 3 mg/L; (c) 15 mg/L.

Mentions: Chlorophyll a is the main component in Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells, and changes of chlorophyll content can indirectly represent the change of internal elements in algae which may be affected by pesticides. The dynamic changes of chlorophyll a of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured in media with three concentrations of pesticides (butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) and normal water during six days are shown in Fig. 1. Low concentrations of glyphosate promoted the algae growth as shown in Fig. 1(a,b). The chlorophyll content in algae, when exposed to the high concentration (15 mg/L) of glyphosate for a long time, decreased after day 3 as show in Fig. 1(c). For pesticide butachlor, although the concentration of 0.6 mg/L promoted the algae growth from day 0 to day 5, it impeded the growth of algae as compared with the normal water medium. The chlorophyll content in algae, when exposed to higher concentrations (3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) of butachlor decreased after day 1 as shown in Fig. 1(b,c). Chlorella pyrenoidosa seemed to be more sensitive to atrazine, and all three concentrations caused the decrease of chlorophyll accumulation after day 1. The responses from microalgae cultured in different types and concentrations of pesticides were different to each other by the comparison of chlorophyll a. As one part of internal components in microalgae, the information of chlorophyll a would be useful for identifying the varieties of pesticides.


Identification of pesticide varieties by testing microalgae using Visible/Near Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging technology.

Shao Y, Jiang L, Zhou H, Pan J, He Y - Sci Rep (2016)

Dynamic changes of chlorophyll a of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured in media with pesticides (butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) of three concentrations (a–c) and water from day 0 to day 5. (a) 0.6 mg/L; (b) 3 mg/L; (c) 15 mg/L.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829843&req=5

f1: Dynamic changes of chlorophyll a of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured in media with pesticides (butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) of three concentrations (a–c) and water from day 0 to day 5. (a) 0.6 mg/L; (b) 3 mg/L; (c) 15 mg/L.
Mentions: Chlorophyll a is the main component in Chlorella pyrenoidosa cells, and changes of chlorophyll content can indirectly represent the change of internal elements in algae which may be affected by pesticides. The dynamic changes of chlorophyll a of Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured in media with three concentrations of pesticides (butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) and normal water during six days are shown in Fig. 1. Low concentrations of glyphosate promoted the algae growth as shown in Fig. 1(a,b). The chlorophyll content in algae, when exposed to the high concentration (15 mg/L) of glyphosate for a long time, decreased after day 3 as show in Fig. 1(c). For pesticide butachlor, although the concentration of 0.6 mg/L promoted the algae growth from day 0 to day 5, it impeded the growth of algae as compared with the normal water medium. The chlorophyll content in algae, when exposed to higher concentrations (3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) of butachlor decreased after day 1 as shown in Fig. 1(b,c). Chlorella pyrenoidosa seemed to be more sensitive to atrazine, and all three concentrations caused the decrease of chlorophyll accumulation after day 1. The responses from microalgae cultured in different types and concentrations of pesticides were different to each other by the comparison of chlorophyll a. As one part of internal components in microalgae, the information of chlorophyll a would be useful for identifying the varieties of pesticides.

Bottom Line: In our study, the feasibility of using visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging technology to detect the changes of the internal components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa so as to determine the varieties of pesticides (such as butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) at three concentrations (0.6 mg/L, 3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) was investigated.The RC-LDA model, which achieved an average correct classification rate of 97.0% was more superior than FW-PLSDA (72.2%) and CARS-PLSDA (84.0%), and it proved that visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging could be a rapid and reliable technique to identify pesticide varieties.It also proved that microalgae can be a very promising medium to indicate characteristics of pesticides.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.

ABSTRACT
In our study, the feasibility of using visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging technology to detect the changes of the internal components of Chlorella pyrenoidosa so as to determine the varieties of pesticides (such as butachlor, atrazine and glyphosate) at three concentrations (0.6 mg/L, 3 mg/L, 15 mg/L) was investigated. Three models (partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with full wavelengths, FW-PLSDA; partial least squares discriminant analysis combined with competitive adaptive reweighted sampling algorithm, CARS-PLSDA; linear discrimination analysis combined with regression coefficients, RC-LDA) were built by the hyperspectral data of Chlorella pyrenoidosa to find which model can produce the most optimal result. The RC-LDA model, which achieved an average correct classification rate of 97.0% was more superior than FW-PLSDA (72.2%) and CARS-PLSDA (84.0%), and it proved that visible/near infrared hyperspectral imaging could be a rapid and reliable technique to identify pesticide varieties. It also proved that microalgae can be a very promising medium to indicate characteristics of pesticides.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus