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Pollution of mycological surfaces in hospital emergency departments correlates positively with blood NKT CD3(+) 16(+) 56(+) and negatively with CD4(+) cell levels of their staff.

Suska M, Lewicki S, Kiepura A, Winnicka I, Leszczyński P, Bielawska-Drózd A, Cieślik P, Kubiak L, Depczyńska D, Brewczyńska A, Skopińska-Różewska E, Kocik J - Cent Eur J Immunol (2016)

Bottom Line: The qualitative analysis of the surface samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus.There was no statistically significant difference between the level of NKT; however, the percentage of NK cells was lower in the blood of HED workers than in the blood of offices personnel.No other correlations were found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Regenerative Medicine, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was the assessment of the putative influence of yeast and filamentous fungi in healthcare and control (office) workplaces (10 of each kind) on immune system competence measured by NK (natural killer), CD4(+), and NKT (natural killer T lymphocyte) cell levels in the blood of the personnel employed at these workplaces. Imprints from floors and walls were collected in winter. The blood was taken in spring the following year, from 40 men, 26 to 53 years old, healthcare workers of hospital emergency departments (HED), who had been working for at least five years in their current positions, and from 36 corresponding controls, working in control offices. Evaluation of blood leukocyte subpopulations was done by flow cytometry. The qualitative analysis of the surface samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus. There was no statistically significant difference between the level of NKT; however, the percentage of NK cells was lower in the blood of HED workers than in the blood of offices personnel. Spearman analysis revealed the existence of positive correlation (r = 0.4677, p = 0.002) between the total CFU/25 cm(2) obtained by imprinting method from walls and floors of HED and the percentage of NKT (CD3(+)16(+)56(+)) lymphocytes collected from the blood of their personnel, and negative correlation (r = -0. 3688, p = 0.019) between this parameter of fungal pollution and the percentage of CD4(+) lymphocytes in the blood of HED staff. No other correlations were found.

No MeSH data available.


Positive correlation between the number of fungi collected by imprinting method from walls and floors of hospital emergency departments and the level of NKT lymphocytes in the blood of HED workers
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Figure 0005: Positive correlation between the number of fungi collected by imprinting method from walls and floors of hospital emergency departments and the level of NKT lymphocytes in the blood of HED workers

Mentions: Spearman correlation analysis revealed significant positive correlation (r = 0.4677; p = 0.002) between the percentage of NKT cells in the blood of HED workers and the number of CFU/25cm2 obtained from the walls and floors of hospital emergency departments (Fig. 5). No correlation was found in the case of control offices (Fig. 6) and their staff (r = –0.0251; p = 0.8841). Negative correlation was found between total number of fungi on surfaces in HED and % of CD4+ lymphocytes in the blood of heath care workers (r = –0.3688; p = 0.019, Fig. 7) and no such correlation in office workers (Fig. 8).


Pollution of mycological surfaces in hospital emergency departments correlates positively with blood NKT CD3(+) 16(+) 56(+) and negatively with CD4(+) cell levels of their staff.

Suska M, Lewicki S, Kiepura A, Winnicka I, Leszczyński P, Bielawska-Drózd A, Cieślik P, Kubiak L, Depczyńska D, Brewczyńska A, Skopińska-Różewska E, Kocik J - Cent Eur J Immunol (2016)

Positive correlation between the number of fungi collected by imprinting method from walls and floors of hospital emergency departments and the level of NKT lymphocytes in the blood of HED workers
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829823&req=5

Figure 0005: Positive correlation between the number of fungi collected by imprinting method from walls and floors of hospital emergency departments and the level of NKT lymphocytes in the blood of HED workers
Mentions: Spearman correlation analysis revealed significant positive correlation (r = 0.4677; p = 0.002) between the percentage of NKT cells in the blood of HED workers and the number of CFU/25cm2 obtained from the walls and floors of hospital emergency departments (Fig. 5). No correlation was found in the case of control offices (Fig. 6) and their staff (r = –0.0251; p = 0.8841). Negative correlation was found between total number of fungi on surfaces in HED and % of CD4+ lymphocytes in the blood of heath care workers (r = –0.3688; p = 0.019, Fig. 7) and no such correlation in office workers (Fig. 8).

Bottom Line: The qualitative analysis of the surface samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus.There was no statistically significant difference between the level of NKT; however, the percentage of NK cells was lower in the blood of HED workers than in the blood of offices personnel.No other correlations were found.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Regenerative Medicine, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was the assessment of the putative influence of yeast and filamentous fungi in healthcare and control (office) workplaces (10 of each kind) on immune system competence measured by NK (natural killer), CD4(+), and NKT (natural killer T lymphocyte) cell levels in the blood of the personnel employed at these workplaces. Imprints from floors and walls were collected in winter. The blood was taken in spring the following year, from 40 men, 26 to 53 years old, healthcare workers of hospital emergency departments (HED), who had been working for at least five years in their current positions, and from 36 corresponding controls, working in control offices. Evaluation of blood leukocyte subpopulations was done by flow cytometry. The qualitative analysis of the surface samples revealed a prevalence of strains belonging to Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium spp. genus. There was no statistically significant difference between the level of NKT; however, the percentage of NK cells was lower in the blood of HED workers than in the blood of offices personnel. Spearman analysis revealed the existence of positive correlation (r = 0.4677, p = 0.002) between the total CFU/25 cm(2) obtained by imprinting method from walls and floors of HED and the percentage of NKT (CD3(+)16(+)56(+)) lymphocytes collected from the blood of their personnel, and negative correlation (r = -0. 3688, p = 0.019) between this parameter of fungal pollution and the percentage of CD4(+) lymphocytes in the blood of HED staff. No other correlations were found.

No MeSH data available.