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A new species of Apolochus (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridea, Amphilochidae) in Maryland coastal bays, USA with notes on its abundance and distribution.

Morales-Núñez AG, Chigbu P - Zookeys (2016)

Bottom Line: Apolochus cresti sp. n. can be distinguished from Apolochus neapolitanus by a combination of characters, including the shape of the lateral cephalic lobe, shape of the mandible molar process, relative length of mandible palp article 3, the carpal lobe length of gnathopod 2, and the lack of sub-marginal spines on antero-lateral surface of gnathopod 2.Ovigerous females carrying eggs were present from March to May and in October, reaching their peak in May, although only ovigerous females carrying juveniles were found in May.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NSF - CREST Center for the Integrated Study of Coastal Ecosystem Processes and Dynamics in the Mid-Atlantic Region (CISCEP); NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC), Department of Natural Sciences, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA.

ABSTRACT
A new amphilochid amphipod, Apolochus cresti sp. n. is described from specimens collected in the shallow waters of Maryland coastal bays, Mid-Atlantic region, at depths from 1.7 to 2.1 m. The new species appears to be most closely related to the northeastern Atlantic species, Apolochus neapolitanus sensu Krapp-Schickel, 1982. Apolochus cresti sp. n. can be distinguished from Apolochus neapolitanus by a combination of characters, including the shape of the lateral cephalic lobe, shape of the mandible molar process, relative length of mandible palp article 3, the carpal lobe length of gnathopod 2, and the lack of sub-marginal spines on antero-lateral surface of gnathopod 2. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the abundance of Apolochus cresti and the amount of macroalgae collected per station, bay, and month. Ovigerous females carrying eggs were present from March to May and in October, reaching their peak in May, although only ovigerous females carrying juveniles were found in May. Males were abundant in March and were collected also in May and October. A key for the separation of Apolochus species is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean total abundance ± SE of Apolochuscresti sp. n. and mean total wet weight of macroalgae ± SE found in Maryland Coastal Bays during this study: A stations B areas C months. CB = Chincoteague Bay; NB = Newport Bay; SB = Sinepuxent Bay; IWB = Isle of Wight Bay; and AB = Assawoman Bay. * Samples were not taken.
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Figure 10: Mean total abundance ± SE of Apolochuscresti sp. n. and mean total wet weight of macroalgae ± SE found in Maryland Coastal Bays during this study: A stations B areas C months. CB = Chincoteague Bay; NB = Newport Bay; SB = Sinepuxent Bay; IWB = Isle of Wight Bay; and AB = Assawoman Bay. * Samples were not taken.

Mentions: A total of 2,105 individuals of Apolochuscresti were found in the MCBs. Specimens of Apolochuscresti were only found in five of thirteen stations along the bays (Fig. 1). The highest mean abundance of Apolochuscresti (3.4 ± 2.0 ind m-2) and mean values of macroalgae biomass (12.91 ± 8.33 g ww m-2) were found at station 10 in Isle of Wight Bay, in the northern area (Fig. 9A−B, respectively). Spearman’s rank correlation analysis indicated positive correlation between the abundance of Apolochuscresti and the amount of macroalgae collected per station (rs = 0.7, p < 0.001), bay (rs = 0.8, p < 0.001), and month (rs = 0.8, p < 0.001) (Fig. 10A−C, respectively). Overall, Apolochuscresti was most abundant when a mixture of macroalgae (e.g., Agardhiella sp., Gracilaria sp., Ceramium sp., and Cladophora sp.) was observed in Isle of Wight and Assawoman Bays in the northern area of MCBs during March in this study. Furthermore, no significant correlations (p > 0.05) were observed between the abundance of Apolochuscresti and abiotic variables measured in the bays (Tables 1–2).


A new species of Apolochus (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridea, Amphilochidae) in Maryland coastal bays, USA with notes on its abundance and distribution.

Morales-Núñez AG, Chigbu P - Zookeys (2016)

Mean total abundance ± SE of Apolochuscresti sp. n. and mean total wet weight of macroalgae ± SE found in Maryland Coastal Bays during this study: A stations B areas C months. CB = Chincoteague Bay; NB = Newport Bay; SB = Sinepuxent Bay; IWB = Isle of Wight Bay; and AB = Assawoman Bay. * Samples were not taken.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829802&req=5

Figure 10: Mean total abundance ± SE of Apolochuscresti sp. n. and mean total wet weight of macroalgae ± SE found in Maryland Coastal Bays during this study: A stations B areas C months. CB = Chincoteague Bay; NB = Newport Bay; SB = Sinepuxent Bay; IWB = Isle of Wight Bay; and AB = Assawoman Bay. * Samples were not taken.
Mentions: A total of 2,105 individuals of Apolochuscresti were found in the MCBs. Specimens of Apolochuscresti were only found in five of thirteen stations along the bays (Fig. 1). The highest mean abundance of Apolochuscresti (3.4 ± 2.0 ind m-2) and mean values of macroalgae biomass (12.91 ± 8.33 g ww m-2) were found at station 10 in Isle of Wight Bay, in the northern area (Fig. 9A−B, respectively). Spearman’s rank correlation analysis indicated positive correlation between the abundance of Apolochuscresti and the amount of macroalgae collected per station (rs = 0.7, p < 0.001), bay (rs = 0.8, p < 0.001), and month (rs = 0.8, p < 0.001) (Fig. 10A−C, respectively). Overall, Apolochuscresti was most abundant when a mixture of macroalgae (e.g., Agardhiella sp., Gracilaria sp., Ceramium sp., and Cladophora sp.) was observed in Isle of Wight and Assawoman Bays in the northern area of MCBs during March in this study. Furthermore, no significant correlations (p > 0.05) were observed between the abundance of Apolochuscresti and abiotic variables measured in the bays (Tables 1–2).

Bottom Line: Apolochus cresti sp. n. can be distinguished from Apolochus neapolitanus by a combination of characters, including the shape of the lateral cephalic lobe, shape of the mandible molar process, relative length of mandible palp article 3, the carpal lobe length of gnathopod 2, and the lack of sub-marginal spines on antero-lateral surface of gnathopod 2.Ovigerous females carrying eggs were present from March to May and in October, reaching their peak in May, although only ovigerous females carrying juveniles were found in May.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NSF - CREST Center for the Integrated Study of Coastal Ecosystem Processes and Dynamics in the Mid-Atlantic Region (CISCEP); NOAA Living Marine Resources Cooperative Science Center (LMRCSC), Department of Natural Sciences, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853, USA.

ABSTRACT
A new amphilochid amphipod, Apolochus cresti sp. n. is described from specimens collected in the shallow waters of Maryland coastal bays, Mid-Atlantic region, at depths from 1.7 to 2.1 m. The new species appears to be most closely related to the northeastern Atlantic species, Apolochus neapolitanus sensu Krapp-Schickel, 1982. Apolochus cresti sp. n. can be distinguished from Apolochus neapolitanus by a combination of characters, including the shape of the lateral cephalic lobe, shape of the mandible molar process, relative length of mandible palp article 3, the carpal lobe length of gnathopod 2, and the lack of sub-marginal spines on antero-lateral surface of gnathopod 2. Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the abundance of Apolochus cresti and the amount of macroalgae collected per station, bay, and month. Ovigerous females carrying eggs were present from March to May and in October, reaching their peak in May, although only ovigerous females carrying juveniles were found in May. Males were abundant in March and were collected also in May and October. A key for the separation of Apolochus species is presented.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus