Limits...
A new species of sponge inhabiting barnacle Bryozobia (Archaeobalanidae, Bryozobiinae) in the West Pacific.

Yu MC, Kolbasov GA, Chan BK - Zookeys (2016)

Bottom Line: This paper describes a new species, Bryozobia rossi sp. n., collected by scuba diving in both Taiwan and Japan.Bryozobia rossi sp. n., a member of the subfamily Bryozobiinae (Ross and Newman 1996), has atria and open end portals and a single irregular basal whorl of portals at the same level as basal hemiportals; this morphology varies from all previously described bryozobiines.According to our review of relevant literature, this is the first reported Bryozobia in the Pacific, and this study is the first to describe the morphology of oral cone, cirri, and penis for the genus Bryozobia.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan; Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University and Academia Sinica, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a new species, Bryozobia rossi sp. n., collected by scuba diving in both Taiwan and Japan. Bryozobia rossi sp. n., a member of the subfamily Bryozobiinae (Ross and Newman 1996), has atria and open end portals and a single irregular basal whorl of portals at the same level as basal hemiportals; this morphology varies from all previously described bryozobiines. According to our review of relevant literature, this is the first reported Bryozobia in the Pacific, and this study is the first to describe the morphology of oral cone, cirri, and penis for the genus Bryozobia.

No MeSH data available.


Collection sites of sponge-inhabiting bryozobiine barnacles in Taiwan and Japan.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829799&req=5

Figure 2: Collection sites of sponge-inhabiting bryozobiine barnacles in Taiwan and Japan.

Mentions: Bryozobiines were collected from thin encrusting sponges on rocks (AgelasnakamuraiHoshino 1985, Theonellaaff.conicaKieschnick 1896, and Theonellamirabilis [de Laubenfels 1954]) in Taiwan (Green Island and Orchid Island) and Japan (Kochi) by scuba diving to a depth of 3–24 m (Figure 2). Barnacles were separated from the host sponges using forceps and 95% EtOH was injected into mantle cavity for better fixation of the soft tissue for molecular analysis, in prior to the whole specimen was immersed in Ethanol. Both the barnacle and sponges were subsequently preserved in 95% EtOH. Morphological characters of barnacle shell parts (basis, plates, scutum, and tergum) and somatic bodies (six pairs of cirri, the penis, and oral cone) were examined. The remnants of the sponge on the surface of shell, scutum, and tergum were removed using forceps and immersed in 2% bleach for about two hours to completely digest the organic tissue and rinsed subsequently in purified water for five times and air-dried. The shell, scutum, and tergum were observed under stereomicroscope Leica MZ 6 (Leica, Germany) and digital single-lens reflex cameras (Canon EOS 5D Mark III, Canon Camera Co. Ltd, Japan) installed with a 65 mm f/2.8 1–5× macro lens. Then shell, scutum and tergum were air-dried, gold-coated and observed under SEM, following methods in Chan et al. (2013).


A new species of sponge inhabiting barnacle Bryozobia (Archaeobalanidae, Bryozobiinae) in the West Pacific.

Yu MC, Kolbasov GA, Chan BK - Zookeys (2016)

Collection sites of sponge-inhabiting bryozobiine barnacles in Taiwan and Japan.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829799&req=5

Figure 2: Collection sites of sponge-inhabiting bryozobiine barnacles in Taiwan and Japan.
Mentions: Bryozobiines were collected from thin encrusting sponges on rocks (AgelasnakamuraiHoshino 1985, Theonellaaff.conicaKieschnick 1896, and Theonellamirabilis [de Laubenfels 1954]) in Taiwan (Green Island and Orchid Island) and Japan (Kochi) by scuba diving to a depth of 3–24 m (Figure 2). Barnacles were separated from the host sponges using forceps and 95% EtOH was injected into mantle cavity for better fixation of the soft tissue for molecular analysis, in prior to the whole specimen was immersed in Ethanol. Both the barnacle and sponges were subsequently preserved in 95% EtOH. Morphological characters of barnacle shell parts (basis, plates, scutum, and tergum) and somatic bodies (six pairs of cirri, the penis, and oral cone) were examined. The remnants of the sponge on the surface of shell, scutum, and tergum were removed using forceps and immersed in 2% bleach for about two hours to completely digest the organic tissue and rinsed subsequently in purified water for five times and air-dried. The shell, scutum, and tergum were observed under stereomicroscope Leica MZ 6 (Leica, Germany) and digital single-lens reflex cameras (Canon EOS 5D Mark III, Canon Camera Co. Ltd, Japan) installed with a 65 mm f/2.8 1–5× macro lens. Then shell, scutum and tergum were air-dried, gold-coated and observed under SEM, following methods in Chan et al. (2013).

Bottom Line: This paper describes a new species, Bryozobia rossi sp. n., collected by scuba diving in both Taiwan and Japan.Bryozobia rossi sp. n., a member of the subfamily Bryozobiinae (Ross and Newman 1996), has atria and open end portals and a single irregular basal whorl of portals at the same level as basal hemiportals; this morphology varies from all previously described bryozobiines.According to our review of relevant literature, this is the first reported Bryozobia in the Pacific, and this study is the first to describe the morphology of oral cone, cirri, and penis for the genus Bryozobia.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Biodiversity Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan; Doctoral Degree Program in Marine Biotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University and Academia Sinica, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
This paper describes a new species, Bryozobia rossi sp. n., collected by scuba diving in both Taiwan and Japan. Bryozobia rossi sp. n., a member of the subfamily Bryozobiinae (Ross and Newman 1996), has atria and open end portals and a single irregular basal whorl of portals at the same level as basal hemiportals; this morphology varies from all previously described bryozobiines. According to our review of relevant literature, this is the first reported Bryozobia in the Pacific, and this study is the first to describe the morphology of oral cone, cirri, and penis for the genus Bryozobia.

No MeSH data available.