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Acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw.

Olejniczak D, Dera P, Religioni U, Duda-Zalewska A, Deptała A - Contemp Oncol (Pozn) (2016)

Bottom Line: More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided.No statistically significant differences between the respondents' willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05).Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Division, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Aim of the study: To check the degree of acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw.

Material and methods: This study involved 562 women between 20 and 77 years of age, all of whom were patients visiting gynaecologists practising in clinics in the City of Warsaw. The studied population was divided into six age categories. The study method was a diagnostic poll conducted with the use of an original questionnaire containing 10 multiple-choice questions.

Results: Nearly 70% of the women showed an interest in taking a test to detect predispositions to develop breast and ovarian cancer. More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided. No statistically significant differences between the respondents' willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05). The most frequent answer given by women in all groups was that the amount to pay was too high. Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education.

Conclusions: Women with a confirmed increased risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer due to inter alia the presence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations should pay particular attention to 1(st) and 2(nd) level prophylaxis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Respondents’ education
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Figure 0001: Respondents’ education

Mentions: The majority of the respondents were women with secondary education (59%). A large proportion of the women had studied in higher education (Fig. 1).


Acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw.

Olejniczak D, Dera P, Religioni U, Duda-Zalewska A, Deptała A - Contemp Oncol (Pozn) (2016)

Respondents’ education
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829752&req=5

Figure 0001: Respondents’ education
Mentions: The majority of the respondents were women with secondary education (59%). A large proportion of the women had studied in higher education (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided.No statistically significant differences between the respondents' willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05).Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Division, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Aim of the study: To check the degree of acceptance of, inclination for, and barriers in genetic testing for gene mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancers among female residents of Warsaw.

Material and methods: This study involved 562 women between 20 and 77 years of age, all of whom were patients visiting gynaecologists practising in clinics in the City of Warsaw. The studied population was divided into six age categories. The study method was a diagnostic poll conducted with the use of an original questionnaire containing 10 multiple-choice questions.

Results: Nearly 70% of the women showed an interest in taking a test to detect predispositions to develop breast and ovarian cancer. More than 10% did not want to take such a test, while every fifth women was undecided. No statistically significant differences between the respondents' willingness to pay and education were found (p = 0.05). The most frequent answer given by women in all groups was that the amount to pay was too high. Such an answer was given by 52.17% of women with primary education, 65.22% of women with vocational education, 58.61% of women with secondary education, and 41.62% of women with higher education.

Conclusions: Women with a confirmed increased risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer due to inter alia the presence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations should pay particular attention to 1(st) and 2(nd) level prophylaxis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus