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Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

Liu Y, Lin C, Zeng Y, Li H, Cai B, Huang K, Yuan Y, Li Y - Biomed Res Int (2016)

Bottom Line: A few large hair follicles were found.Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability.Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Histology and Embryology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515000, China.

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biocompatibility of microcapsules. The same number of empty DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules was introduced into the peritoneal cavity of mice and retrieved after 1 and 3 weeks for measurement of rate of fibrosis (a). One week after transplantation into the mouse peritoneal cavity, the retrieved Ca (b) and Ba (c) microcapsules showed increased fibrosis (2.3% and 5.9% (P < 0.01), resp.), with surrounding inflammatory cells. (Bar = 100 μm.)
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fig5: Biocompatibility of microcapsules. The same number of empty DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules was introduced into the peritoneal cavity of mice and retrieved after 1 and 3 weeks for measurement of rate of fibrosis (a). One week after transplantation into the mouse peritoneal cavity, the retrieved Ca (b) and Ba (c) microcapsules showed increased fibrosis (2.3% and 5.9% (P < 0.01), resp.), with surrounding inflammatory cells. (Bar = 100 μm.)

Mentions: One week after transplantation into the peritoneal cavity, the retrieval rates of Ba and Ca microcapsules were 84.3% and 78.9%, respectively (P > 0.05) (data not shown). After 3 weeks, the retrieval rates were 76.8% and 70.2%, respectively (P > 0.05). After 1 week, the rates of fibrosis for Ba and Ca microcapsules were 1.47% and 2.10% (P > 0.05), respectively. After 3 weeks, the rates of fibrosis were 2.31% and 5.85%, respectively (P < 0.01, Figure 5(a)). When the microcapsules were fragmented, the cells within the Ca microcapsules escaped (Figure 5(b)) while those within the Ba microcapsules were retained in microcapsule membranes.


Comparison of Calcium and Barium Microcapsules as Scaffolds in the Development of Artificial Dermal Papillae.

Liu Y, Lin C, Zeng Y, Li H, Cai B, Huang K, Yuan Y, Li Y - Biomed Res Int (2016)

Biocompatibility of microcapsules. The same number of empty DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules was introduced into the peritoneal cavity of mice and retrieved after 1 and 3 weeks for measurement of rate of fibrosis (a). One week after transplantation into the mouse peritoneal cavity, the retrieved Ca (b) and Ba (c) microcapsules showed increased fibrosis (2.3% and 5.9% (P < 0.01), resp.), with surrounding inflammatory cells. (Bar = 100 μm.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829698&req=5

fig5: Biocompatibility of microcapsules. The same number of empty DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules was introduced into the peritoneal cavity of mice and retrieved after 1 and 3 weeks for measurement of rate of fibrosis (a). One week after transplantation into the mouse peritoneal cavity, the retrieved Ca (b) and Ba (c) microcapsules showed increased fibrosis (2.3% and 5.9% (P < 0.01), resp.), with surrounding inflammatory cells. (Bar = 100 μm.)
Mentions: One week after transplantation into the peritoneal cavity, the retrieval rates of Ba and Ca microcapsules were 84.3% and 78.9%, respectively (P > 0.05) (data not shown). After 3 weeks, the retrieval rates were 76.8% and 70.2%, respectively (P > 0.05). After 1 week, the rates of fibrosis for Ba and Ca microcapsules were 1.47% and 2.10% (P > 0.05), respectively. After 3 weeks, the rates of fibrosis were 2.31% and 5.85%, respectively (P < 0.01, Figure 5(a)). When the microcapsules were fragmented, the cells within the Ca microcapsules escaped (Figure 5(b)) while those within the Ba microcapsules were retained in microcapsule membranes.

Bottom Line: A few large hair follicles were found.Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability.Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Histology and Embryology, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515000, China.

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to develop and evaluate barium and calcium microcapsules as candidates for scaffolding in artificial dermal papilla. Dermal papilla cells (DPCs) were isolated and cultured by one-step collagenase treatment. The DPC-Ba and DPC-Ca microcapsules were prepared by using a specially designed, high-voltage, electric-field droplet generator. Selected microcapsules were assessed for long-term inductive properties with xenotransplantation into Sprague-Dawley rat ears. Both barium and calcium microcapsules maintained xenogenic dermal papilla cells in an immunoisolated environment and induced the formation of hair follicle structures. Calcium microcapsules showed better biocompatibility, permeability, and cell viability in comparison with barium microcapsules. Before 18 weeks, calcium microcapsules gathered together, with no substantial immune response. After 32 weeks, some microcapsules were near inflammatory cells and wrapped with fiber. A few large hair follicles were found. Control samples showed no marked changes at the implantation site. Barium microcapsules were superior to calcium microcapsules in structural and mechanical stability. The cells encapsulated in hydrogel barium microcapsules exhibited higher short-term viability. This study established a model to culture DPCs in 3D culture conditions. Barium microcapsules may be useful in short-term transplantation study. Calcium microcapsules may provide an effective scaffold for the development of artificial dermal papilla.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus