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Use of Lactobacillus plantarum Strains as a Bio-Control Strategy against Food-Borne Pathogenic Microorganisms.

Arena MP, Silvain A, Normanno G, Grieco F, Drider D, Spano G, Fiocco D - Front Microbiol (2016)

Bottom Line: Our data suggest that the ability of L. plantarum cultures to contrast pathogens growth in vitro depends, at least in part, on a pH-lowering effect of supernatants and/or on the presence of organic acids.Cluster analysis was performed in order to group L. plantarum strains according to their antimicrobial effect.This study emphasizes the tempting use of the tested L. plantarum strains and/or their CFS as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia Foggia, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Lactobacillus plantarum is one of the most versatile species extensively used in the food industry both as microbial starters and probiotic microorganisms. Several L. plantarum strains have been shown to produce different antimicrobial compounds such as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, and also bacteriocins and antimicrobial peptides, both denoted by a variable spectrum of action. In recent decades, the selection of microbial molecules and/or bacterial strains able to produce antagonistic molecules to be used as antimicrobials and preservatives has been attracting scientific interest, in order to eliminate or reduce chemical additives, because of the growing attention of consumers for healthy and natural food products. The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of several food-isolated L. plantarum strains, analyzed against the pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. Antagonistic activity was assayed by agar spot test and revealed that strain L. plantarum 105 had the strongest ability to contrast the growth of L. monocytogenes, while strains L. plantarum 106 and 107 were the most active microorganisms against E. coli O157:H7. The antimicrobial ability was also screened by well diffusion assay and broth micro-dilution method using cell-free supernatants (CFS) from each Lactobacillus strain. Moreover, the chemical nature of the molecules released in the CFS, and possibly underlying the antagonistic activity, was preliminary characterized by exposure to different constraints such as pH neutralization, heating, catalase, and proteinase treatments. Our data suggest that the ability of L. plantarum cultures to contrast pathogens growth in vitro depends, at least in part, on a pH-lowering effect of supernatants and/or on the presence of organic acids. Cluster analysis was performed in order to group L. plantarum strains according to their antimicrobial effect. This study emphasizes the tempting use of the tested L. plantarum strains and/or their CFS as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Antimicrobial ability of selected L. plantarum strains against pathogenic bacteria as measured by agar spot assay. Data are the mean ± SD of at least three independent experiments.
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Figure 1: Antimicrobial ability of selected L. plantarum strains against pathogenic bacteria as measured by agar spot assay. Data are the mean ± SD of at least three independent experiments.

Mentions: In this study, 79 L. plantarum strains were investigated for their possible antimicrobial activity against seven pathogenic bacteria, i.e., L. monocytogenes, S. Enteritidis, E. coli O157:H7, and four strains of S. aureus. The preliminary screening of all Lactobacillus strains, carried out by agar spot test, revealed a different range of antimicrobial activity, depending both on L. plantarum strain tested and on pathogen considered. Figure 1 reports data obtained with the best inhibiting L. plantarum strains, i.e. which determined overall inhibition halos of more than 5 radius mm, according to the classification proposed by Gaudana et al. (2010). As shown in Figure 1, some strains exhibited a very strong ability to inhibit the growth of food pathogens. In particular, L. plantarum 105 exhibited the major ability to inhibit L. monocytogenes, while both L. plantarum 106 and L. plantarum 107 presented the highest antagonistic effect on growth of E. coli O157:H7. S. Enteritidis, S. aureus R1070, R1208, S1209, and S1220 were mainly inhibited by L. plantarum 119, L. plantarum 32, L. plantarum 106, and L. plantarum 108, respectively. Contrariwise, L. plantarum 118 and 119 did not show any inhibition effects on the growth of S. aureus R1208. Similarly, L. plantarum 30 was not able to affect the development of S. aureus S1209.


Use of Lactobacillus plantarum Strains as a Bio-Control Strategy against Food-Borne Pathogenic Microorganisms.

Arena MP, Silvain A, Normanno G, Grieco F, Drider D, Spano G, Fiocco D - Front Microbiol (2016)

Antimicrobial ability of selected L. plantarum strains against pathogenic bacteria as measured by agar spot assay. Data are the mean ± SD of at least three independent experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829616&req=5

Figure 1: Antimicrobial ability of selected L. plantarum strains against pathogenic bacteria as measured by agar spot assay. Data are the mean ± SD of at least three independent experiments.
Mentions: In this study, 79 L. plantarum strains were investigated for their possible antimicrobial activity against seven pathogenic bacteria, i.e., L. monocytogenes, S. Enteritidis, E. coli O157:H7, and four strains of S. aureus. The preliminary screening of all Lactobacillus strains, carried out by agar spot test, revealed a different range of antimicrobial activity, depending both on L. plantarum strain tested and on pathogen considered. Figure 1 reports data obtained with the best inhibiting L. plantarum strains, i.e. which determined overall inhibition halos of more than 5 radius mm, according to the classification proposed by Gaudana et al. (2010). As shown in Figure 1, some strains exhibited a very strong ability to inhibit the growth of food pathogens. In particular, L. plantarum 105 exhibited the major ability to inhibit L. monocytogenes, while both L. plantarum 106 and L. plantarum 107 presented the highest antagonistic effect on growth of E. coli O157:H7. S. Enteritidis, S. aureus R1070, R1208, S1209, and S1220 were mainly inhibited by L. plantarum 119, L. plantarum 32, L. plantarum 106, and L. plantarum 108, respectively. Contrariwise, L. plantarum 118 and 119 did not show any inhibition effects on the growth of S. aureus R1208. Similarly, L. plantarum 30 was not able to affect the development of S. aureus S1209.

Bottom Line: Our data suggest that the ability of L. plantarum cultures to contrast pathogens growth in vitro depends, at least in part, on a pH-lowering effect of supernatants and/or on the presence of organic acids.Cluster analysis was performed in order to group L. plantarum strains according to their antimicrobial effect.This study emphasizes the tempting use of the tested L. plantarum strains and/or their CFS as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia Foggia, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Lactobacillus plantarum is one of the most versatile species extensively used in the food industry both as microbial starters and probiotic microorganisms. Several L. plantarum strains have been shown to produce different antimicrobial compounds such as organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, and also bacteriocins and antimicrobial peptides, both denoted by a variable spectrum of action. In recent decades, the selection of microbial molecules and/or bacterial strains able to produce antagonistic molecules to be used as antimicrobials and preservatives has been attracting scientific interest, in order to eliminate or reduce chemical additives, because of the growing attention of consumers for healthy and natural food products. The aim of this work was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of several food-isolated L. plantarum strains, analyzed against the pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. Antagonistic activity was assayed by agar spot test and revealed that strain L. plantarum 105 had the strongest ability to contrast the growth of L. monocytogenes, while strains L. plantarum 106 and 107 were the most active microorganisms against E. coli O157:H7. The antimicrobial ability was also screened by well diffusion assay and broth micro-dilution method using cell-free supernatants (CFS) from each Lactobacillus strain. Moreover, the chemical nature of the molecules released in the CFS, and possibly underlying the antagonistic activity, was preliminary characterized by exposure to different constraints such as pH neutralization, heating, catalase, and proteinase treatments. Our data suggest that the ability of L. plantarum cultures to contrast pathogens growth in vitro depends, at least in part, on a pH-lowering effect of supernatants and/or on the presence of organic acids. Cluster analysis was performed in order to group L. plantarum strains according to their antimicrobial effect. This study emphasizes the tempting use of the tested L. plantarum strains and/or their CFS as antimicrobial agents against food-borne pathogens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus