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Strategies for Community Education Prior to Clinical Trial Recruitment for a Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention in Uganda.

Mitchell SM, Pedersen HN, Sekikubo M, Biryabarema C, Byamugisha JJ, Mwesigwa D, Steinberg M, Money DM, Ogilvie GS - Front Oncol (2016)

Bottom Line: Simple language with a clear message was essential for both groups.Localization of language and reciprocal communication using demonstration between community members and HCW was a key theme.Although perceptions of the format are similar between women and HCW, the content, language, and messaging that should be incorporated in a health education strategy differ markedly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia , Vancouver, BC , Canada.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Community engagement and education can improve acceptability and participation in clinical trials conducted in Kisenyi, Uganda. In preparation for a randomized controlled trial exploring different methods for cervical cancer screening, we explored optimal engagement strategies from the perspective of community members and health professionals.

Methods: We conducted key informant interviews followed by serial community forums with purposeful sampling and compared the perspectives of women in Kisenyi (N = 26) to health-care workers (HCW) at the local and tertiary care center levels (N = 61) in a participatory, iterative process.

Results: Key themes identified included format, content, language, message delivery, and target population. Women in Kisenyi see demonstration as a key part of an educational intervention and not solely a didactic session, whereas health professionals emphasized the biomedical content and natural history of cervical cancer. Using local language and lay leaders with locally accessible terminology was more of a priority for women in Kisenyi than clinicians. Simple language with a clear message was essential for both groups. Localization of language and reciprocal communication using demonstration between community members and HCW was a key theme.

Conclusion: Although perceptions of the format are similar between women and HCW, the content, language, and messaging that should be incorporated in a health education strategy differ markedly. The call for lay leaders to participate in health promotion is a clear step toward transforming this cervical cancer screening project to be a fully participatory process. This is important in scaling up cervical cancer screening programs in Kisenyi and will be central in developing health education interventions for this purpose.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study flow diagram.
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Figure 1: Study flow diagram.

Mentions: The study consisted of a series of informant interviews and focus groups that were carried out in four stages: (1) key informant interviews to develop forum questions; (2) focus group with women from the community and staff at the local health unit; (3) focus group with health-care workers (HCW) at the tertiary care hospital (Mulago Hospital); and (4) debriefing session with women in the community (Figure 1). Key informant interviews with community health workers who had previously participated in the ASPIRE project, including a village chairperson and a member of Kampala city council (N = 4), were performed to develop discussion guides for the community forums (see Table 1). These were followed by three community forum discussions. Purposive sampling was used to select key community forum participants, most of whom had participated in the program’s screening activities in 2011.


Strategies for Community Education Prior to Clinical Trial Recruitment for a Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention in Uganda.

Mitchell SM, Pedersen HN, Sekikubo M, Biryabarema C, Byamugisha JJ, Mwesigwa D, Steinberg M, Money DM, Ogilvie GS - Front Oncol (2016)

Study flow diagram.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829601&req=5

Figure 1: Study flow diagram.
Mentions: The study consisted of a series of informant interviews and focus groups that were carried out in four stages: (1) key informant interviews to develop forum questions; (2) focus group with women from the community and staff at the local health unit; (3) focus group with health-care workers (HCW) at the tertiary care hospital (Mulago Hospital); and (4) debriefing session with women in the community (Figure 1). Key informant interviews with community health workers who had previously participated in the ASPIRE project, including a village chairperson and a member of Kampala city council (N = 4), were performed to develop discussion guides for the community forums (see Table 1). These were followed by three community forum discussions. Purposive sampling was used to select key community forum participants, most of whom had participated in the program’s screening activities in 2011.

Bottom Line: Simple language with a clear message was essential for both groups.Localization of language and reciprocal communication using demonstration between community members and HCW was a key theme.Although perceptions of the format are similar between women and HCW, the content, language, and messaging that should be incorporated in a health education strategy differ markedly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of British Columbia , Vancouver, BC , Canada.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Community engagement and education can improve acceptability and participation in clinical trials conducted in Kisenyi, Uganda. In preparation for a randomized controlled trial exploring different methods for cervical cancer screening, we explored optimal engagement strategies from the perspective of community members and health professionals.

Methods: We conducted key informant interviews followed by serial community forums with purposeful sampling and compared the perspectives of women in Kisenyi (N = 26) to health-care workers (HCW) at the local and tertiary care center levels (N = 61) in a participatory, iterative process.

Results: Key themes identified included format, content, language, message delivery, and target population. Women in Kisenyi see demonstration as a key part of an educational intervention and not solely a didactic session, whereas health professionals emphasized the biomedical content and natural history of cervical cancer. Using local language and lay leaders with locally accessible terminology was more of a priority for women in Kisenyi than clinicians. Simple language with a clear message was essential for both groups. Localization of language and reciprocal communication using demonstration between community members and HCW was a key theme.

Conclusion: Although perceptions of the format are similar between women and HCW, the content, language, and messaging that should be incorporated in a health education strategy differ markedly. The call for lay leaders to participate in health promotion is a clear step toward transforming this cervical cancer screening project to be a fully participatory process. This is important in scaling up cervical cancer screening programs in Kisenyi and will be central in developing health education interventions for this purpose.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus