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Plant Organellar Proteomics in Response to Dehydration: Turning Protein Repertoire into Insights.

Gupta DB, Rai Y, Gayali S, Chakraborty S, Chakraborty N - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes.Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture.The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biotechnology, TERI University New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes. Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture. Water-deficit or dehydration is the most critical environmental factor that plants are exposed to during their life cycle, which influences geographical distribution and productivity of many crop species. The cellular responses to dehydration are orchestrated by a series of multidirectional relays of biochemical events at organelle level. The new challenge is to dissect the underlying mechanisms controlling the perception of stress signals and their transmission to cellular machinery for activation of adaptive responses. The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions. During past decades, organellar proteomics has proved to be useful not only for deciphering reprograming of plant responses to dehydration, but also to dissect stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes a range of organellar proteomics investigations under dehydration to gain a holistic view of plant responses to water-deficit conditions, which may facilitate future efforts to develop genetically engineered crops for better adaptation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representation of the cross talk among different pathways under water-deficit conditions. Dehydration stress leads to turgor imbalance and production of ROS. The turgor imbalance is mechanosensed, leading to modification in cytoskeleton proteins (lectins, actin, fibrillin) and sugars (mannose, aldolase) in turn leading to stretch-activation of ion channels (H+ ATPases, Ca2+) and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin signaling pathway. Wall sugars are mobilized and activate SnRK. Cell wall undergoes modifications like lignification and contraction. The stress is sensed by receptors (CBPK, WAKs, protein kinases, receptor kinases), which interact with GTPase. GTPase activates ABA and 14-3-3. Level of 14-3-3 increases with ROS production and parallely interacts and activates ABA and SnRK. 14-3-3 translocates to the nucleus and interacts with ACDH leading to choromatin remodeling and activation of transcription factors (AP2, DREB, RF2B, TLP). ABA interacts with the FCA receptors, and nuclear envelope protein SUN1 detects the ion channel activation owing to mechanosensing further leading to activation of TFs.
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Figure 3: Representation of the cross talk among different pathways under water-deficit conditions. Dehydration stress leads to turgor imbalance and production of ROS. The turgor imbalance is mechanosensed, leading to modification in cytoskeleton proteins (lectins, actin, fibrillin) and sugars (mannose, aldolase) in turn leading to stretch-activation of ion channels (H+ ATPases, Ca2+) and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin signaling pathway. Wall sugars are mobilized and activate SnRK. Cell wall undergoes modifications like lignification and contraction. The stress is sensed by receptors (CBPK, WAKs, protein kinases, receptor kinases), which interact with GTPase. GTPase activates ABA and 14-3-3. Level of 14-3-3 increases with ROS production and parallely interacts and activates ABA and SnRK. 14-3-3 translocates to the nucleus and interacts with ACDH leading to choromatin remodeling and activation of transcription factors (AP2, DREB, RF2B, TLP). ABA interacts with the FCA receptors, and nuclear envelope protein SUN1 detects the ion channel activation owing to mechanosensing further leading to activation of TFs.

Mentions: Perception of osmotic stress, as it emerged from the analysis, is a complex phenomenon that comprises multitude of signaling pathways. The primary inducer of all stress-sensing mechanisms is any kind of change in intracellular osmotic balance. Alteration in cell turgor pressure leads to activation of proteins in the cell membrane and extracellular matrix viz., WAKs and receptor kinases, which may interact with signaling proteins specifically 14-3-3, MAP kinases and protein kinases in the cytosol. The interactions relay the signal to activate several families of transcription factors in the nucleus including WRKY, AP2, DREB, EREBP, RF2B, and leucine zipper. These cues also activate Ca2+ channels and ROS secondary signaling pathways, which further exemplify the stress signal via CDPKs to ensue modulation of stress-responsive components such as annexins, calnexins, and calmodulins. Annexin and calnexin are known to translocate to the cell membrane under dehydration, which enhances association with other molecules in the membrane, both resulting in the activation of the downstream signaling cascade (Lee et al., 2006; Jia et al., 2009). Both the proteins are also essential part of ABA-mediated signaling pathway. The reactive oxygen moieties induce the ABA-mediated pathways by activation of signaling proteins like SnRKs, protein phosphatase 2C and intermediates like 14-3-3 proteins in the cell membrane and cytosol, FCA receptor in the nuclear membrane and transcription factor such as tubby like protein (Figure 3). Proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport such as RAN, WIP1, dyamin and RANbP ensure the directionality of signal relays and facilitate the overall signaling network.


Plant Organellar Proteomics in Response to Dehydration: Turning Protein Repertoire into Insights.

Gupta DB, Rai Y, Gayali S, Chakraborty S, Chakraborty N - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Representation of the cross talk among different pathways under water-deficit conditions. Dehydration stress leads to turgor imbalance and production of ROS. The turgor imbalance is mechanosensed, leading to modification in cytoskeleton proteins (lectins, actin, fibrillin) and sugars (mannose, aldolase) in turn leading to stretch-activation of ion channels (H+ ATPases, Ca2+) and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin signaling pathway. Wall sugars are mobilized and activate SnRK. Cell wall undergoes modifications like lignification and contraction. The stress is sensed by receptors (CBPK, WAKs, protein kinases, receptor kinases), which interact with GTPase. GTPase activates ABA and 14-3-3. Level of 14-3-3 increases with ROS production and parallely interacts and activates ABA and SnRK. 14-3-3 translocates to the nucleus and interacts with ACDH leading to choromatin remodeling and activation of transcription factors (AP2, DREB, RF2B, TLP). ABA interacts with the FCA receptors, and nuclear envelope protein SUN1 detects the ion channel activation owing to mechanosensing further leading to activation of TFs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829595&req=5

Figure 3: Representation of the cross talk among different pathways under water-deficit conditions. Dehydration stress leads to turgor imbalance and production of ROS. The turgor imbalance is mechanosensed, leading to modification in cytoskeleton proteins (lectins, actin, fibrillin) and sugars (mannose, aldolase) in turn leading to stretch-activation of ion channels (H+ ATPases, Ca2+) and activation of Ca2+/calmodulin signaling pathway. Wall sugars are mobilized and activate SnRK. Cell wall undergoes modifications like lignification and contraction. The stress is sensed by receptors (CBPK, WAKs, protein kinases, receptor kinases), which interact with GTPase. GTPase activates ABA and 14-3-3. Level of 14-3-3 increases with ROS production and parallely interacts and activates ABA and SnRK. 14-3-3 translocates to the nucleus and interacts with ACDH leading to choromatin remodeling and activation of transcription factors (AP2, DREB, RF2B, TLP). ABA interacts with the FCA receptors, and nuclear envelope protein SUN1 detects the ion channel activation owing to mechanosensing further leading to activation of TFs.
Mentions: Perception of osmotic stress, as it emerged from the analysis, is a complex phenomenon that comprises multitude of signaling pathways. The primary inducer of all stress-sensing mechanisms is any kind of change in intracellular osmotic balance. Alteration in cell turgor pressure leads to activation of proteins in the cell membrane and extracellular matrix viz., WAKs and receptor kinases, which may interact with signaling proteins specifically 14-3-3, MAP kinases and protein kinases in the cytosol. The interactions relay the signal to activate several families of transcription factors in the nucleus including WRKY, AP2, DREB, EREBP, RF2B, and leucine zipper. These cues also activate Ca2+ channels and ROS secondary signaling pathways, which further exemplify the stress signal via CDPKs to ensue modulation of stress-responsive components such as annexins, calnexins, and calmodulins. Annexin and calnexin are known to translocate to the cell membrane under dehydration, which enhances association with other molecules in the membrane, both resulting in the activation of the downstream signaling cascade (Lee et al., 2006; Jia et al., 2009). Both the proteins are also essential part of ABA-mediated signaling pathway. The reactive oxygen moieties induce the ABA-mediated pathways by activation of signaling proteins like SnRKs, protein phosphatase 2C and intermediates like 14-3-3 proteins in the cell membrane and cytosol, FCA receptor in the nuclear membrane and transcription factor such as tubby like protein (Figure 3). Proteins involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport such as RAN, WIP1, dyamin and RANbP ensure the directionality of signal relays and facilitate the overall signaling network.

Bottom Line: Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes.Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture.The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biotechnology, TERI University New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Stress adaptation or tolerance in plants is a complex phenomenon involving changes in physiological and metabolic processes. Plants must develop elaborate networks of defense mechanisms, and adapt to and survive for sustainable agriculture. Water-deficit or dehydration is the most critical environmental factor that plants are exposed to during their life cycle, which influences geographical distribution and productivity of many crop species. The cellular responses to dehydration are orchestrated by a series of multidirectional relays of biochemical events at organelle level. The new challenge is to dissect the underlying mechanisms controlling the perception of stress signals and their transmission to cellular machinery for activation of adaptive responses. The completeness of current descriptions of spatial distribution of proteins, the relevance of subcellular locations in diverse functional processes, and the changes of protein abundance in response to dehydration hold the key to understanding how plants cope with such stress conditions. During past decades, organellar proteomics has proved to be useful not only for deciphering reprograming of plant responses to dehydration, but also to dissect stress-responsive pathways. This review summarizes a range of organellar proteomics investigations under dehydration to gain a holistic view of plant responses to water-deficit conditions, which may facilitate future efforts to develop genetically engineered crops for better adaptation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus