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A novel role for the root cap in phosphate uptake and homeostasis.

Kanno S, Arrighi JF, Chiarenza S, Bayle V, Berthomé R, Péret B, Javot H, Delannoy E, Marin E, Nakanishi TM, Thibaud MC, Nussaume L - Elife (2016)

Bottom Line: Remarkably, the diminutive size of the root cap cells at the root-to-soil exchange surface accounts for a significant amount of the total seedling phosphate uptake (approximately 20%).This level of Pi absorption is sufficient for shoot biomass production (up to a 180% gain in soil), as well as repression of Pi starvation-induced genes.These results extend our understanding of this important tissue from its previously described roles in environmental perception to novel functions in mineral nutrition and homeostasis control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The root cap has a fundamental role in sensing environmental cues as well as regulating root growth via altered meristem activity. Despite this well-established role in the control of developmental processes in roots, the root cap's function in nutrition remains obscure. Here, we uncover its role in phosphate nutrition by targeted cellular inactivation or phosphate transport complementation in Arabidopsis, using a transactivation strategy with an innovative high-resolution real-time (33)P imaging technique. Remarkably, the diminutive size of the root cap cells at the root-to-soil exchange surface accounts for a significant amount of the total seedling phosphate uptake (approximately 20%). This level of Pi absorption is sufficient for shoot biomass production (up to a 180% gain in soil), as well as repression of Pi starvation-induced genes. These results extend our understanding of this important tissue from its previously described roles in environmental perception to novel functions in mineral nutrition and homeostasis control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of PHF1 complementation on gene expression.Expression levels (log2) in phf1 Q0171>>PHF1, phf1-1 and WT lines after 3 days in +P relative to -P for locally (A) or systemically (B) regulated genes. Values are means ± SD of 3 technical replicates.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.01410.7554/eLife.14577.015Figure 3—figure supplement 3—source data 1.(A) Effect of PHF1 complementation on locally-regulated gene expression. (B) Effect of PHF1 complementation on systemically-regulated gene expression.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.015
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fig3s3: Effect of PHF1 complementation on gene expression.Expression levels (log2) in phf1 Q0171>>PHF1, phf1-1 and WT lines after 3 days in +P relative to -P for locally (A) or systemically (B) regulated genes. Values are means ± SD of 3 technical replicates.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.01410.7554/eLife.14577.015Figure 3—figure supplement 3—source data 1.(A) Effect of PHF1 complementation on locally-regulated gene expression. (B) Effect of PHF1 complementation on systemically-regulated gene expression.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.015

Mentions: (A) GFP expression pattern (green) labels root tissues (root tip and mature zone) where PHF1 complementation occurs in three different transgenic lines. Scale bars: 100 μm. (B) Quantification of Pi uptake after transfer of plantlets to +P medium for 3 d in the presence of 33Pi. Values are means ± SD. 10 plantlets were analyzed individually. Significantly different from phf1-1: P<0.0001 (Student’s t-test). (C) Rosette biomass. Plants were grown in -P and transferred to +P medium for 4 d. Values are means ± SD of 23 to 24 individually weighed rosettes. Significantly different from phf1-1: *P=0.008; **P=0.004; ***P<0.001 (Student’s t-test). (D) Expression level of Pi starvation markers after a 3-day transfer to +P medium relative to low Pi. Results are normalized to phf1-1 values according to Figure 3—figure supplement 3.


A novel role for the root cap in phosphate uptake and homeostasis.

Kanno S, Arrighi JF, Chiarenza S, Bayle V, Berthomé R, Péret B, Javot H, Delannoy E, Marin E, Nakanishi TM, Thibaud MC, Nussaume L - Elife (2016)

Effect of PHF1 complementation on gene expression.Expression levels (log2) in phf1 Q0171>>PHF1, phf1-1 and WT lines after 3 days in +P relative to -P for locally (A) or systemically (B) regulated genes. Values are means ± SD of 3 technical replicates.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.01410.7554/eLife.14577.015Figure 3—figure supplement 3—source data 1.(A) Effect of PHF1 complementation on locally-regulated gene expression. (B) Effect of PHF1 complementation on systemically-regulated gene expression.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.015
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829427&req=5

fig3s3: Effect of PHF1 complementation on gene expression.Expression levels (log2) in phf1 Q0171>>PHF1, phf1-1 and WT lines after 3 days in +P relative to -P for locally (A) or systemically (B) regulated genes. Values are means ± SD of 3 technical replicates.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.01410.7554/eLife.14577.015Figure 3—figure supplement 3—source data 1.(A) Effect of PHF1 complementation on locally-regulated gene expression. (B) Effect of PHF1 complementation on systemically-regulated gene expression.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14577.015
Mentions: (A) GFP expression pattern (green) labels root tissues (root tip and mature zone) where PHF1 complementation occurs in three different transgenic lines. Scale bars: 100 μm. (B) Quantification of Pi uptake after transfer of plantlets to +P medium for 3 d in the presence of 33Pi. Values are means ± SD. 10 plantlets were analyzed individually. Significantly different from phf1-1: P<0.0001 (Student’s t-test). (C) Rosette biomass. Plants were grown in -P and transferred to +P medium for 4 d. Values are means ± SD of 23 to 24 individually weighed rosettes. Significantly different from phf1-1: *P=0.008; **P=0.004; ***P<0.001 (Student’s t-test). (D) Expression level of Pi starvation markers after a 3-day transfer to +P medium relative to low Pi. Results are normalized to phf1-1 values according to Figure 3—figure supplement 3.

Bottom Line: Remarkably, the diminutive size of the root cap cells at the root-to-soil exchange surface accounts for a significant amount of the total seedling phosphate uptake (approximately 20%).This level of Pi absorption is sufficient for shoot biomass production (up to a 180% gain in soil), as well as repression of Pi starvation-induced genes.These results extend our understanding of this important tissue from its previously described roles in environmental perception to novel functions in mineral nutrition and homeostasis control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The root cap has a fundamental role in sensing environmental cues as well as regulating root growth via altered meristem activity. Despite this well-established role in the control of developmental processes in roots, the root cap's function in nutrition remains obscure. Here, we uncover its role in phosphate nutrition by targeted cellular inactivation or phosphate transport complementation in Arabidopsis, using a transactivation strategy with an innovative high-resolution real-time (33)P imaging technique. Remarkably, the diminutive size of the root cap cells at the root-to-soil exchange surface accounts for a significant amount of the total seedling phosphate uptake (approximately 20%). This level of Pi absorption is sufficient for shoot biomass production (up to a 180% gain in soil), as well as repression of Pi starvation-induced genes. These results extend our understanding of this important tissue from its previously described roles in environmental perception to novel functions in mineral nutrition and homeostasis control.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus