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Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms.

Teeling H, Fuchs BM, Bennke CM, Krüger K, Chafee M, Kappelmann L, Reintjes G, Waldmann J, Quast C, Glöckner FO, Lucas J, Wichels A, Gerdts G, Wiltshire KH, Amann RI - Elife (2016)

Bottom Line: Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level.Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes.We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

No MeSH data available.


CAZyme repertoire within the order Alteromonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) at dates with high abundances of Alteromonadales.As expected at the taxomomic level of order, the CAZyme repertoire was diverse. Nonetheless, the obtained pattern was relatively consistent across all four studied years and at some dates notably enriched in CAZymes that play a role during phytoplankton blooms such as GH13 and GH16DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.010
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fig6s2: CAZyme repertoire within the order Alteromonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) at dates with high abundances of Alteromonadales.As expected at the taxomomic level of order, the CAZyme repertoire was diverse. Nonetheless, the obtained pattern was relatively consistent across all four studied years and at some dates notably enriched in CAZymes that play a role during phytoplankton blooms such as GH13 and GH16DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.010

Mentions: For Gammaproteobacteria, recurring patterns were detected for the prominent Alteromonadales and Reinekea clades. Alteromonadales contained some of the GH families that play important roles during phytoplankton blooms, such as GH13 and 16, but were notably poor in or even devoid of others, such as GH29 and GH92, respectively (Figure 6—figure supplement 2). In contrast to other prominent clades, we did not obtain sufficient metagenome sequences for Reinekea for all four years, but only for 2009 and 2010 (Figure 6V). However, the Reinekea CAZyme patterns of 2009 and 2010 were well conserved with high proportions of GH23 and 13, and CBM48, 20, 41, 21, and 25. The GH23 family comprises peptidoglycan lyases and the GH13 family contains α-1,4-glucanases (e.g. α-amylase). CBM48, 20, 41, 21, and 25 all bind α-1,4-glucans such as starch and glycogen, and the ubiquitous CBM50 contains peptidoglycan-binding members. These results are consistent with a glycan niche that involves decomposition of external α-1,4-glucans and possibly peptidoglycan.


Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms.

Teeling H, Fuchs BM, Bennke CM, Krüger K, Chafee M, Kappelmann L, Reintjes G, Waldmann J, Quast C, Glöckner FO, Lucas J, Wichels A, Gerdts G, Wiltshire KH, Amann RI - Elife (2016)

CAZyme repertoire within the order Alteromonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) at dates with high abundances of Alteromonadales.As expected at the taxomomic level of order, the CAZyme repertoire was diverse. Nonetheless, the obtained pattern was relatively consistent across all four studied years and at some dates notably enriched in CAZymes that play a role during phytoplankton blooms such as GH13 and GH16DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.010
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829426&req=5

fig6s2: CAZyme repertoire within the order Alteromonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) at dates with high abundances of Alteromonadales.As expected at the taxomomic level of order, the CAZyme repertoire was diverse. Nonetheless, the obtained pattern was relatively consistent across all four studied years and at some dates notably enriched in CAZymes that play a role during phytoplankton blooms such as GH13 and GH16DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.010
Mentions: For Gammaproteobacteria, recurring patterns were detected for the prominent Alteromonadales and Reinekea clades. Alteromonadales contained some of the GH families that play important roles during phytoplankton blooms, such as GH13 and 16, but were notably poor in or even devoid of others, such as GH29 and GH92, respectively (Figure 6—figure supplement 2). In contrast to other prominent clades, we did not obtain sufficient metagenome sequences for Reinekea for all four years, but only for 2009 and 2010 (Figure 6V). However, the Reinekea CAZyme patterns of 2009 and 2010 were well conserved with high proportions of GH23 and 13, and CBM48, 20, 41, 21, and 25. The GH23 family comprises peptidoglycan lyases and the GH13 family contains α-1,4-glucanases (e.g. α-amylase). CBM48, 20, 41, 21, and 25 all bind α-1,4-glucans such as starch and glycogen, and the ubiquitous CBM50 contains peptidoglycan-binding members. These results are consistent with a glycan niche that involves decomposition of external α-1,4-glucans and possibly peptidoglycan.

Bottom Line: Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level.Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes.We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

No MeSH data available.