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Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms.

Teeling H, Fuchs BM, Bennke CM, Krüger K, Chafee M, Kappelmann L, Reintjes G, Waldmann J, Quast C, Glöckner FO, Lucas J, Wichels A, Gerdts G, Wiltshire KH, Amann RI - Elife (2016)

Bottom Line: Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level.Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes.We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

No MeSH data available.


Location of Helgoland Island (ca. 40 km offshore the northern German coastline) and the long-term ecological research site 'Kabeltonne' (red circle: 54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E) in the German Bight of the North Sea.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.003
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fig1: Location of Helgoland Island (ca. 40 km offshore the northern German coastline) and the long-term ecological research site 'Kabeltonne' (red circle: 54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E) in the German Bight of the North Sea.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.003

Mentions: The samples were taken at Helgoland Island about 40 km offshore in the southeastern North Sea in the German Bight at the station 'Kabeltonne' (54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E; Figure 1) between the main island and the minor island, Düne (German for 'dune'). Water depths at this site fluctuate from 6 to 10 m over the tidal cycle. During most of the year, a westerly current transports water from the English Channel alongside the Dutch and Frisian coast to Helgoland, but water around the island is also influenced by nutrient inputs from the rivers Weser and Elbe and from the northern North Sea (Wiltshire et al., 2010). During the 2009 to 2012 study period, the lowest water temperatures were measured in mid to late February (min. 2010: 1.1°C; max. 2009: 3.4°C), followed by a continuous increase until a peak in August (min. 2011: 18.0°C; max. 2009: 18.7°C) (Supplementary file 1).10.7554/eLife.11888.003Figure 1.Location of Helgoland Island (ca. 40 km offshore the northern German coastline) and the long-term ecological research site 'Kabeltonne' (red circle: 54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E) in the German Bight of the North Sea.


Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms.

Teeling H, Fuchs BM, Bennke CM, Krüger K, Chafee M, Kappelmann L, Reintjes G, Waldmann J, Quast C, Glöckner FO, Lucas J, Wichels A, Gerdts G, Wiltshire KH, Amann RI - Elife (2016)

Location of Helgoland Island (ca. 40 km offshore the northern German coastline) and the long-term ecological research site 'Kabeltonne' (red circle: 54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E) in the German Bight of the North Sea.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.003
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829426&req=5

fig1: Location of Helgoland Island (ca. 40 km offshore the northern German coastline) and the long-term ecological research site 'Kabeltonne' (red circle: 54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E) in the German Bight of the North Sea.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11888.003
Mentions: The samples were taken at Helgoland Island about 40 km offshore in the southeastern North Sea in the German Bight at the station 'Kabeltonne' (54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E; Figure 1) between the main island and the minor island, Düne (German for 'dune'). Water depths at this site fluctuate from 6 to 10 m over the tidal cycle. During most of the year, a westerly current transports water from the English Channel alongside the Dutch and Frisian coast to Helgoland, but water around the island is also influenced by nutrient inputs from the rivers Weser and Elbe and from the northern North Sea (Wiltshire et al., 2010). During the 2009 to 2012 study period, the lowest water temperatures were measured in mid to late February (min. 2010: 1.1°C; max. 2009: 3.4°C), followed by a continuous increase until a peak in August (min. 2011: 18.0°C; max. 2009: 18.7°C) (Supplementary file 1).10.7554/eLife.11888.003Figure 1.Location of Helgoland Island (ca. 40 km offshore the northern German coastline) and the long-term ecological research site 'Kabeltonne' (red circle: 54° 11.3' N, 7° 54.0' E) in the German Bight of the North Sea.

Bottom Line: Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level.Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes.We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Bremen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing.

No MeSH data available.