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Sequential phenotypic constraints on social information use in wild baboons.

Carter AJ, Torrents Ticó M, Cowlishaw G - Elife (2016)

Bottom Line: However, an individual's ability to use information is likely to be dependent on phenotypic constraints operating at three successive steps: acquisition, application, and exploitation.We identified phenotypic constraints at each step of the information use sequence: peripheral individuals in the proximity network were less likely to acquire and apply social information, while subordinate females were less likely to exploit it successfully.As a result of these constraints, the average individual only acquired and exploited social information on.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Social information allows the rapid dissemination of novel information among individuals. However, an individual's ability to use information is likely to be dependent on phenotypic constraints operating at three successive steps: acquisition, application, and exploitation. We tested this novel framework by quantifying the sequential process of social information use with experimental food patches in wild baboons (Papio ursinus). We identified phenotypic constraints at each step of the information use sequence: peripheral individuals in the proximity network were less likely to acquire and apply social information, while subordinate females were less likely to exploit it successfully. Social bonds and personality also played a limiting role along the sequence. As a result of these constraints, the average individual only acquired and exploited social information on.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationships between social network metrics (strength and betweenness) within and between social networks created with five different rules for defining a connection between individuals.The rules were the 5 m chain rule (5 m), 10 m proximity (10 m), directed nearest neighbour (NN), directed grooming interactions (groom) and directed dominance interactions (dom). Colouration is conserved from Figures 2 and 3, where J troop is represented by purple points and L troops by green points, and point luminance represents the number of times the individual acquired information (darker nodes acquired social information on more occasions).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13125.006
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fig2s1: The relationships between social network metrics (strength and betweenness) within and between social networks created with five different rules for defining a connection between individuals.The rules were the 5 m chain rule (5 m), 10 m proximity (10 m), directed nearest neighbour (NN), directed grooming interactions (groom) and directed dominance interactions (dom). Colouration is conserved from Figures 2 and 3, where J troop is represented by purple points and L troops by green points, and point luminance represents the number of times the individual acquired information (darker nodes acquired social information on more occasions).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13125.006

Mentions: To identify the phenotypic constraints on the social information use sequence, we investigated whether individuals’ (i) acquisition, (ii) application and (iii) exploitation of social information were affected by their phenotypes. Phenotypes were quantified according to social traits (dominance rank, network centrality), behavioural traits (personality), and demographic traits (age, sex). Two different measures of network centrality were used, namely the individual strength scores for the 10 m proximity and directed grooming networks, generating six phenotypic predictors in total. Individual betweenness scores were not used because they were strongly correlated with their corresponding strengths in almost all cases (Table 2; Figure 2—figure supplement 1). We chose to use the strengths and betweennesses from the 10 m proximity and directed grooming networks, because these were the best proximity and interaction network predictors of information diffusion respectively (see below). The 10 m proximity and grooming strengths were only marginally correlated with each other (r = -0.29) and below the level of collinearity concern (Dormann et al., 2013). All other combinations of phenotypic variables were similarly below the level of collinearity concern (Table 3).10.7554/eLife.13125.010Table 2.


Sequential phenotypic constraints on social information use in wild baboons.

Carter AJ, Torrents Ticó M, Cowlishaw G - Elife (2016)

The relationships between social network metrics (strength and betweenness) within and between social networks created with five different rules for defining a connection between individuals.The rules were the 5 m chain rule (5 m), 10 m proximity (10 m), directed nearest neighbour (NN), directed grooming interactions (groom) and directed dominance interactions (dom). Colouration is conserved from Figures 2 and 3, where J troop is represented by purple points and L troops by green points, and point luminance represents the number of times the individual acquired information (darker nodes acquired social information on more occasions).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13125.006
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829417&req=5

fig2s1: The relationships between social network metrics (strength and betweenness) within and between social networks created with five different rules for defining a connection between individuals.The rules were the 5 m chain rule (5 m), 10 m proximity (10 m), directed nearest neighbour (NN), directed grooming interactions (groom) and directed dominance interactions (dom). Colouration is conserved from Figures 2 and 3, where J troop is represented by purple points and L troops by green points, and point luminance represents the number of times the individual acquired information (darker nodes acquired social information on more occasions).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13125.006
Mentions: To identify the phenotypic constraints on the social information use sequence, we investigated whether individuals’ (i) acquisition, (ii) application and (iii) exploitation of social information were affected by their phenotypes. Phenotypes were quantified according to social traits (dominance rank, network centrality), behavioural traits (personality), and demographic traits (age, sex). Two different measures of network centrality were used, namely the individual strength scores for the 10 m proximity and directed grooming networks, generating six phenotypic predictors in total. Individual betweenness scores were not used because they were strongly correlated with their corresponding strengths in almost all cases (Table 2; Figure 2—figure supplement 1). We chose to use the strengths and betweennesses from the 10 m proximity and directed grooming networks, because these were the best proximity and interaction network predictors of information diffusion respectively (see below). The 10 m proximity and grooming strengths were only marginally correlated with each other (r = -0.29) and below the level of collinearity concern (Dormann et al., 2013). All other combinations of phenotypic variables were similarly below the level of collinearity concern (Table 3).10.7554/eLife.13125.010Table 2.

Bottom Line: However, an individual's ability to use information is likely to be dependent on phenotypic constraints operating at three successive steps: acquisition, application, and exploitation.We identified phenotypic constraints at each step of the information use sequence: peripheral individuals in the proximity network were less likely to acquire and apply social information, while subordinate females were less likely to exploit it successfully.As a result of these constraints, the average individual only acquired and exploited social information on.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Social information allows the rapid dissemination of novel information among individuals. However, an individual's ability to use information is likely to be dependent on phenotypic constraints operating at three successive steps: acquisition, application, and exploitation. We tested this novel framework by quantifying the sequential process of social information use with experimental food patches in wild baboons (Papio ursinus). We identified phenotypic constraints at each step of the information use sequence: peripheral individuals in the proximity network were less likely to acquire and apply social information, while subordinate females were less likely to exploit it successfully. Social bonds and personality also played a limiting role along the sequence. As a result of these constraints, the average individual only acquired and exploited social information on.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus