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Geyer EA, Majumdar S, Rice LM - Elife (2016)

Bottom Line: Modernizing a classic technique to study microtubules has revealed that the stability of a microtubule is related to its growth rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Biophysics and Biochemistry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States.

ABSTRACT
Modernizing a classic technique to study microtubules has revealed that the stability of a microtubule is related to its growth rate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A modernized form of a classic technique enables the growth and stabilization of microtubules to be studied.(A) Left: Duellberg et al. used microfluidics to abruptly stop microtubule growth via the "washout" approach. Right: Sample data showing microtubule length versus time. Before washout, the microtubule grows steadily; after washout, it shrinks slowly for a time; and after catastrophe, it shrinks rapidly (Panel adapted from Figures 1A and 2A, Duellberg et al.). (B) Duellberg et al. observed correlations between the microtubule growth rate and the size of the stabilizing cap, which consists of GTP-bound αβ-tubulin subunits (indicated by the non-faded circles). The caps are marked by EB1 proteins (not shown explicitly).
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fig1: A modernized form of a classic technique enables the growth and stabilization of microtubules to be studied.(A) Left: Duellberg et al. used microfluidics to abruptly stop microtubule growth via the "washout" approach. Right: Sample data showing microtubule length versus time. Before washout, the microtubule grows steadily; after washout, it shrinks slowly for a time; and after catastrophe, it shrinks rapidly (Panel adapted from Figures 1A and 2A, Duellberg et al.). (B) Duellberg et al. observed correlations between the microtubule growth rate and the size of the stabilizing cap, which consists of GTP-bound αβ-tubulin subunits (indicated by the non-faded circles). The caps are marked by EB1 proteins (not shown explicitly).

Mentions: The switch from the growing state to the shrinking state is known as catastrophe, and is essential for microtubules to work correctly. Catastrophe occurs when the microtubule loses its stabilizing cap, which is a biochemically distinct region near the growing end. Despite substantial efforts, both the size of this stabilizing cap and its relationship to microtubule growth rates have remained obscure. Now, in eLife, Thomas Surrey and co-workers at the Francis Crick Institute and the London Centre for Nanotechnology – including Christian Duellberg as first author – use state-of-the-art methods to resolve these longstanding conundrums (Figure 1; Duellberg et al., 2016).Figure 1.A modernized form of a classic technique enables the growth and stabilization of microtubules to be studied.


May I check your cap?

Geyer EA, Majumdar S, Rice LM - Elife (2016)

A modernized form of a classic technique enables the growth and stabilization of microtubules to be studied.(A) Left: Duellberg et al. used microfluidics to abruptly stop microtubule growth via the "washout" approach. Right: Sample data showing microtubule length versus time. Before washout, the microtubule grows steadily; after washout, it shrinks slowly for a time; and after catastrophe, it shrinks rapidly (Panel adapted from Figures 1A and 2A, Duellberg et al.). (B) Duellberg et al. observed correlations between the microtubule growth rate and the size of the stabilizing cap, which consists of GTP-bound αβ-tubulin subunits (indicated by the non-faded circles). The caps are marked by EB1 proteins (not shown explicitly).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829414&req=5

fig1: A modernized form of a classic technique enables the growth and stabilization of microtubules to be studied.(A) Left: Duellberg et al. used microfluidics to abruptly stop microtubule growth via the "washout" approach. Right: Sample data showing microtubule length versus time. Before washout, the microtubule grows steadily; after washout, it shrinks slowly for a time; and after catastrophe, it shrinks rapidly (Panel adapted from Figures 1A and 2A, Duellberg et al.). (B) Duellberg et al. observed correlations between the microtubule growth rate and the size of the stabilizing cap, which consists of GTP-bound αβ-tubulin subunits (indicated by the non-faded circles). The caps are marked by EB1 proteins (not shown explicitly).
Mentions: The switch from the growing state to the shrinking state is known as catastrophe, and is essential for microtubules to work correctly. Catastrophe occurs when the microtubule loses its stabilizing cap, which is a biochemically distinct region near the growing end. Despite substantial efforts, both the size of this stabilizing cap and its relationship to microtubule growth rates have remained obscure. Now, in eLife, Thomas Surrey and co-workers at the Francis Crick Institute and the London Centre for Nanotechnology – including Christian Duellberg as first author – use state-of-the-art methods to resolve these longstanding conundrums (Figure 1; Duellberg et al., 2016).Figure 1.A modernized form of a classic technique enables the growth and stabilization of microtubules to be studied.

Bottom Line: Modernizing a classic technique to study microtubules has revealed that the stability of a microtubule is related to its growth rate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Biophysics and Biochemistry, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States.

ABSTRACT
Modernizing a classic technique to study microtubules has revealed that the stability of a microtubule is related to its growth rate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus