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Current Perspectives on Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of Syphilis.

Lago EG - Cureus (2016)

Bottom Line: This is the time to carefully evaluate traditional as well as new strategies to prevent congenital syphilis.On the other hand, the emergence of new technologies has raised doubts about the best algorithm to be used when proper laboratory resources are available.Conditions are quite heterogeneous across populations, and some procedures should not be generalized while there is no evidence that supports some changes and while in-depth studies about local conditions are not conducted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul - PUCRS ; Edipucrs University Publisher, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul - PUCRS.

ABSTRACT
This article aims to provide an update on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis by drawing upon some important basic concepts and reviewing the most recent literature on the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis in pregnancy. New technologies, such as automated and point-of-care immunologic tests, are shifting some paradigms, which will certainly be further investigated in the forthcoming years. This is the time to carefully evaluate traditional as well as new strategies to prevent congenital syphilis. Adverse outcomes of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis can be prevented with antenatal screening and penicillin therapy, which proved to have an excellent cost-benefit ratio even in populations with a low prevalence of syphilis. However, syphilis epidemiology is influenced by socioeconomic and cultural factors, and major challenges are faced by poor and developing countries in which the severity of the problem is extremely alarming. On the other hand, the emergence of new technologies has raised doubts about the best algorithm to be used when proper laboratory resources are available. Conditions are quite heterogeneous across populations, and some procedures should not be generalized while there is no evidence that supports some changes and while in-depth studies about local conditions are not conducted. Official organizations need to be alert in order to avoid isolated decisions and ensure that evidence-based guidelines be used in the management of syphilis in pregnancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The four pillars that represent the strategy of the World Health Organization for elimination of congenital syphilis.Ref. [78-79]
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FIG3: The four pillars that represent the strategy of the World Health Organization for elimination of congenital syphilis.Ref. [78-79]

Mentions: In the 1990s, the PAHO and some countries, such as Brazil, had already launched programs for the eradication of congenital syphilis for Latin America and the Caribbean, acknowledging the great burden of MTCT of syphilis on the region [11, 75-76]. In 2013, the PAHO renewed its strategic plan [77]. The WHO’s global strategic plan for the elimination of congenital syphilis was launched in 2007. This plan establishes that the initiatives be adapted to each country; be integrated into other strategies, such as sexually transmitted infections/HIV programs, ANC programs, and mother-infant health; respect individual rights; and collaborate with institutions at various levels. Addressing these challenges, the WHO proposes four pillars of a strategy to eliminate congenital syphilis for countries to adopt, adapt, and implement (Figure 3) [78-79].


Current Perspectives on Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of Syphilis.

Lago EG - Cureus (2016)

The four pillars that represent the strategy of the World Health Organization for elimination of congenital syphilis.Ref. [78-79]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829408&req=5

FIG3: The four pillars that represent the strategy of the World Health Organization for elimination of congenital syphilis.Ref. [78-79]
Mentions: In the 1990s, the PAHO and some countries, such as Brazil, had already launched programs for the eradication of congenital syphilis for Latin America and the Caribbean, acknowledging the great burden of MTCT of syphilis on the region [11, 75-76]. In 2013, the PAHO renewed its strategic plan [77]. The WHO’s global strategic plan for the elimination of congenital syphilis was launched in 2007. This plan establishes that the initiatives be adapted to each country; be integrated into other strategies, such as sexually transmitted infections/HIV programs, ANC programs, and mother-infant health; respect individual rights; and collaborate with institutions at various levels. Addressing these challenges, the WHO proposes four pillars of a strategy to eliminate congenital syphilis for countries to adopt, adapt, and implement (Figure 3) [78-79].

Bottom Line: This is the time to carefully evaluate traditional as well as new strategies to prevent congenital syphilis.On the other hand, the emergence of new technologies has raised doubts about the best algorithm to be used when proper laboratory resources are available.Conditions are quite heterogeneous across populations, and some procedures should not be generalized while there is no evidence that supports some changes and while in-depth studies about local conditions are not conducted.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul - PUCRS ; Edipucrs University Publisher, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul - PUCRS.

ABSTRACT
This article aims to provide an update on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis by drawing upon some important basic concepts and reviewing the most recent literature on the diagnosis and treatment of syphilis in pregnancy. New technologies, such as automated and point-of-care immunologic tests, are shifting some paradigms, which will certainly be further investigated in the forthcoming years. This is the time to carefully evaluate traditional as well as new strategies to prevent congenital syphilis. Adverse outcomes of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis can be prevented with antenatal screening and penicillin therapy, which proved to have an excellent cost-benefit ratio even in populations with a low prevalence of syphilis. However, syphilis epidemiology is influenced by socioeconomic and cultural factors, and major challenges are faced by poor and developing countries in which the severity of the problem is extremely alarming. On the other hand, the emergence of new technologies has raised doubts about the best algorithm to be used when proper laboratory resources are available. Conditions are quite heterogeneous across populations, and some procedures should not be generalized while there is no evidence that supports some changes and while in-depth studies about local conditions are not conducted. Official organizations need to be alert in order to avoid isolated decisions and ensure that evidence-based guidelines be used in the management of syphilis in pregnancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus