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Comparison of Neurological Function in Males and Females from Two Substrains of C57BL/6 Mice.

Ashworth A, Bardgett ME, Fowler J, Garber H, Griffith M, Curran CP - Toxics (2014)

Bottom Line: However, B6N females had significantly shorter path lengths in the reversal and shifted-reduced phases.In the fear conditioning test, B6N males had a significantly longer time freezing in the new context compared with B6J males, but no significant differences were found in contextual or cued tests.Both factors (sex and substrain) must be taken into account when designing developmental neurotoxicology studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Kentucky University, SC344 Nunn Dr, Highland Heights, KY 41099, USA.

ABSTRACT

The C57BL/6 (B6) mouse is the background strain most frequently used for genetically-modified mice. Previous studies have found significant behavioral and genetic differences between the B6J (The Jackson Laboratory) and B6N substrains (National Institutes of Health); however, most studies employed only male mice. We performed a comprehensive battery of motor function and learning and memory tests on male and female mice from both substrains. The B6N male mice had greater improvement in the rotarod test. In contrast, B6J female mice had longer latencies to falling from the rotarod. In the Morris water maze (MWM), B6J males had significantly shorter latencies to finding the hidden platform. However, B6N females had significantly shorter path lengths in the reversal and shifted-reduced phases. In open field locomotor activity, B6J males had higher activity levels, whereas B6N females took longer to habituate. In the fear conditioning test, B6N males had a significantly longer time freezing in the new context compared with B6J males, but no significant differences were found in contextual or cued tests. In summary, our findings demonstrate the importance of testing both males and females in neurobehavioral studies. Both factors (sex and substrain) must be taken into account when designing developmental neurotoxicology studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A–C) Open field locomotor. There was a main effect of genotype for males (p < 0.01) and a gene × interval interaction for females (F11,418 = 4.97; p < 0.001). The B6J males had higher total activity throughout the test session compared with B6N males (p < 0.01). The B6J males also had greater activity in the central zone compared with the B6N males (p < 0.05). During the first 5-min interval, B6J females were significantly more active than B6N females (p < 0.001). The B6N female mice were significantly more active during the next three intervals (p < 0.01), and there was a trend for significance (p < 0.1) in the fifth interval. Data are the least square means ± S.E.M. * p < 0.5, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.
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Figure 1: (A–C) Open field locomotor. There was a main effect of genotype for males (p < 0.01) and a gene × interval interaction for females (F11,418 = 4.97; p < 0.001). The B6J males had higher total activity throughout the test session compared with B6N males (p < 0.01). The B6J males also had greater activity in the central zone compared with the B6N males (p < 0.05). During the first 5-min interval, B6J females were significantly more active than B6N females (p < 0.001). The B6N female mice were significantly more active during the next three intervals (p < 0.01), and there was a trend for significance (p < 0.1) in the fifth interval. Data are the least square means ± S.E.M. * p < 0.5, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.

Mentions: C57BL/6J male mice were significantly more active than C57BL/6N males when analyzing total beam breaks (Figure 1A) and activity in the central zone (Figure 1B). A different pattern was observed in female mice (Figure 1C). B6J females had higher activity in the first 5-min interval, but B6N females were more active during the next 20 min. This suggests that B6N females took longer to habituate to the test apparatus than the B6J females.


Comparison of Neurological Function in Males and Females from Two Substrains of C57BL/6 Mice.

Ashworth A, Bardgett ME, Fowler J, Garber H, Griffith M, Curran CP - Toxics (2014)

(A–C) Open field locomotor. There was a main effect of genotype for males (p < 0.01) and a gene × interval interaction for females (F11,418 = 4.97; p < 0.001). The B6J males had higher total activity throughout the test session compared with B6N males (p < 0.01). The B6J males also had greater activity in the central zone compared with the B6N males (p < 0.05). During the first 5-min interval, B6J females were significantly more active than B6N females (p < 0.001). The B6N female mice were significantly more active during the next three intervals (p < 0.01), and there was a trend for significance (p < 0.1) in the fifth interval. Data are the least square means ± S.E.M. * p < 0.5, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4829364&req=5

Figure 1: (A–C) Open field locomotor. There was a main effect of genotype for males (p < 0.01) and a gene × interval interaction for females (F11,418 = 4.97; p < 0.001). The B6J males had higher total activity throughout the test session compared with B6N males (p < 0.01). The B6J males also had greater activity in the central zone compared with the B6N males (p < 0.05). During the first 5-min interval, B6J females were significantly more active than B6N females (p < 0.001). The B6N female mice were significantly more active during the next three intervals (p < 0.01), and there was a trend for significance (p < 0.1) in the fifth interval. Data are the least square means ± S.E.M. * p < 0.5, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.
Mentions: C57BL/6J male mice were significantly more active than C57BL/6N males when analyzing total beam breaks (Figure 1A) and activity in the central zone (Figure 1B). A different pattern was observed in female mice (Figure 1C). B6J females had higher activity in the first 5-min interval, but B6N females were more active during the next 20 min. This suggests that B6N females took longer to habituate to the test apparatus than the B6J females.

Bottom Line: However, B6N females had significantly shorter path lengths in the reversal and shifted-reduced phases.In the fear conditioning test, B6N males had a significantly longer time freezing in the new context compared with B6J males, but no significant differences were found in contextual or cued tests.Both factors (sex and substrain) must be taken into account when designing developmental neurotoxicology studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Kentucky University, SC344 Nunn Dr, Highland Heights, KY 41099, USA.

ABSTRACT

The C57BL/6 (B6) mouse is the background strain most frequently used for genetically-modified mice. Previous studies have found significant behavioral and genetic differences between the B6J (The Jackson Laboratory) and B6N substrains (National Institutes of Health); however, most studies employed only male mice. We performed a comprehensive battery of motor function and learning and memory tests on male and female mice from both substrains. The B6N male mice had greater improvement in the rotarod test. In contrast, B6J female mice had longer latencies to falling from the rotarod. In the Morris water maze (MWM), B6J males had significantly shorter latencies to finding the hidden platform. However, B6N females had significantly shorter path lengths in the reversal and shifted-reduced phases. In open field locomotor activity, B6J males had higher activity levels, whereas B6N females took longer to habituate. In the fear conditioning test, B6N males had a significantly longer time freezing in the new context compared with B6J males, but no significant differences were found in contextual or cued tests. In summary, our findings demonstrate the importance of testing both males and females in neurobehavioral studies. Both factors (sex and substrain) must be taken into account when designing developmental neurotoxicology studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus