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Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Mycobacterium brisbanense Reveals a Possible Soil Origin and Capability in Fertiliser Synthesis.

Wee WY, Tan TK, Jakubovics NS, Choo SW - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism.These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans.The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Genome Informatics Research Laboratory, High Impact Research Building (HIR) Building, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Mycobacterium brisbanense is a member of Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex, which includes rapidly growing Mycobacterium spp. that normally inhabit soil, dust and water, and can sometimes cause respiratory tract infections in humans. We present the first whole-genome analysis of M. brisbanense UM_WWY which was isolated from a 70-year-old Malaysian patient. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identification of this strain as M. brisbanense and showed that it has an unusually large genome compared with related mycobacteria. The large genome size of M. brisbanense UM_WWY (~7.7Mbp) is consistent with further findings that this strain has a highly variable genome structure that contains many putative horizontally transferred genomic islands and prophage. Comparative analysis showed that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is the only Mycobacterium species that possesses a complete set of genes encoding enzymes involved in the urea cycle, suggesting that this soil bacterium is able to synthesize urea for use as plant fertilizers. It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism. Nevertheless, a large number of predicted virulence genes were identified in M. brisbanense UM_WWY that are mostly shared with well-studied mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus. These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense.

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Venn diagram showing the gene distribution of M. fortuitum complex members and UM_WWY.The four genomes shared 3,388 gene clusters and UM_WWY contains the highest number of strain-specific genes.
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pone.0152682.g004: Venn diagram showing the gene distribution of M. fortuitum complex members and UM_WWY.The four genomes shared 3,388 gene clusters and UM_WWY contains the highest number of strain-specific genes.

Mentions: UM_WWY has a genome size of approximately 7.69 Mbp, which is 0.79–1.35Mbp larger than the other three species. The difference was reflected in the high number of strain-specific gene clusters observed in the genome of UM_WWY (Fig 4). For instance, UM_WWY has the highest number of strain-specific genes (3,214 genes) compared to Mycobacterium mageritense JR2009 (931 genes), Mycobacterium septicum DSM44393 (1,143 genes) and M. fortuitum DSM46621 (753 genes). The high number of UM_WWY-specific genes suggests that this strain is very divergent from the most closely related species.


Whole-Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Mycobacterium brisbanense Reveals a Possible Soil Origin and Capability in Fertiliser Synthesis.

Wee WY, Tan TK, Jakubovics NS, Choo SW - PLoS ONE (2016)

Venn diagram showing the gene distribution of M. fortuitum complex members and UM_WWY.The four genomes shared 3,388 gene clusters and UM_WWY contains the highest number of strain-specific genes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4816395&req=5

pone.0152682.g004: Venn diagram showing the gene distribution of M. fortuitum complex members and UM_WWY.The four genomes shared 3,388 gene clusters and UM_WWY contains the highest number of strain-specific genes.
Mentions: UM_WWY has a genome size of approximately 7.69 Mbp, which is 0.79–1.35Mbp larger than the other three species. The difference was reflected in the high number of strain-specific gene clusters observed in the genome of UM_WWY (Fig 4). For instance, UM_WWY has the highest number of strain-specific genes (3,214 genes) compared to Mycobacterium mageritense JR2009 (931 genes), Mycobacterium septicum DSM44393 (1,143 genes) and M. fortuitum DSM46621 (753 genes). The high number of UM_WWY-specific genes suggests that this strain is very divergent from the most closely related species.

Bottom Line: It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism.These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans.The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Genome Informatics Research Laboratory, High Impact Research Building (HIR) Building, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 50603, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Mycobacterium brisbanense is a member of Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex, which includes rapidly growing Mycobacterium spp. that normally inhabit soil, dust and water, and can sometimes cause respiratory tract infections in humans. We present the first whole-genome analysis of M. brisbanense UM_WWY which was isolated from a 70-year-old Malaysian patient. Molecular phylogenetic analyses confirmed the identification of this strain as M. brisbanense and showed that it has an unusually large genome compared with related mycobacteria. The large genome size of M. brisbanense UM_WWY (~7.7Mbp) is consistent with further findings that this strain has a highly variable genome structure that contains many putative horizontally transferred genomic islands and prophage. Comparative analysis showed that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is the only Mycobacterium species that possesses a complete set of genes encoding enzymes involved in the urea cycle, suggesting that this soil bacterium is able to synthesize urea for use as plant fertilizers. It is likely that M. brisbanense UM_WWY is adapted to live in soil as its primary habitat since the genome contains many genes associated with nitrogen metabolism. Nevertheless, a large number of predicted virulence genes were identified in M. brisbanense UM_WWY that are mostly shared with well-studied mycobacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus. These findings are consistent with the role of M. brisbanense as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. The whole-genome study of UM_WWY has provided the basis for future work of M. brisbanense.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus