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Programmed Cell Death-1 Polymorphisms Decrease the Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis Involving Twelve Case-Control Studies.

Dong W, Gong M, Shi Z, Xiao J, Zhang J, Peng J - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: However, the results of the studies are conflicting.In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs.Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong 528403, China.

ABSTRACT
Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important inhibitory role in anti-tumor responses, so it is considered as a powerful candidate gene for individual's genetic susceptibility to cancer. Recently, some epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. However, the results of the studies are conflicting. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed. We identified all studies reporting the relationship between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancers by electronically searches. According to the inclusion criteria and the quality assessment of Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS), only high quality studies were included. A total of twelve relevant studies involving 5,206 cases and 5,174 controls were recruited. For PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism, significantly decreased cancer risks were obtained among overall population, Asians subgroup and population-based subgroup both in TT vs. CC and TT vs. CT+CC genetic models. In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs. C allele for overall population. However, there were no significant associations between either PD-1.9 (rs2227982) or PD-1 rs7421861 polymorphisms and cancer risks in all genetic models and alleles. For PD-1.3 (rs11568821) polymorphism, we found different cancer susceptibilities between GA vs. GG and AA vs. AG+GG genetic models, and no associations between AA vs. GG, AA+AG vs. GG genetic models or A vs. G allele and cancer risks. In general, our results firstly indicated that PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism is associated a strongly decreased risk of cancers. Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plots of the PD-1.3(rs11568821) polymorphism and cancer risk for overall populations (A for AA vs. GG; B for AA vs. AG+GG; C for AA+AG vs. GG; D for AG vs. GG and E for A vs. G).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.
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pone.0152448.g007: Forest plots of the PD-1.3(rs11568821) polymorphism and cancer risk for overall populations (A for AA vs. GG; B for AA vs. AG+GG; C for AA+AG vs. GG; D for AG vs. GG and E for A vs. G).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.

Mentions: There are four studies containing 1,280 cases and 1,236 controls discussed this polymorphism. All of these studies are population-based and conducted in Asians. Overall, a significantly decreased cancer risk was found in AG vs. GG genetic model (OR = 0.79, 95% CIs: 0.65–0.96, P = 0.021, I2 = 0.0%). Interestingly, an increased cancer risk was found in AA vs. AG+GG genetic model (OR = 2.25, 95% CIs: 1.30–3.87, P = 0.004, I2 = 48.5%). In addition, there were no associations between cancer risk and AA vs. GG (OR = 1.72, 95% CIs: 0.50–5.94, P = 0.394, I2 = 59.4%), AA+AG (OR = 0.92, 95% CIs: 0.63–1.32, P = 0.638, I2 = 68.4%) vs. GG or A vs. G (OR = 1.02, 95% CIs: 0.64–1.62, P = 0.945, I2 = 85.5%) (Fig 7).


Programmed Cell Death-1 Polymorphisms Decrease the Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis Involving Twelve Case-Control Studies.

Dong W, Gong M, Shi Z, Xiao J, Zhang J, Peng J - PLoS ONE (2016)

Forest plots of the PD-1.3(rs11568821) polymorphism and cancer risk for overall populations (A for AA vs. GG; B for AA vs. AG+GG; C for AA+AG vs. GG; D for AG vs. GG and E for A vs. G).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4816386&req=5

pone.0152448.g007: Forest plots of the PD-1.3(rs11568821) polymorphism and cancer risk for overall populations (A for AA vs. GG; B for AA vs. AG+GG; C for AA+AG vs. GG; D for AG vs. GG and E for A vs. G).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.
Mentions: There are four studies containing 1,280 cases and 1,236 controls discussed this polymorphism. All of these studies are population-based and conducted in Asians. Overall, a significantly decreased cancer risk was found in AG vs. GG genetic model (OR = 0.79, 95% CIs: 0.65–0.96, P = 0.021, I2 = 0.0%). Interestingly, an increased cancer risk was found in AA vs. AG+GG genetic model (OR = 2.25, 95% CIs: 1.30–3.87, P = 0.004, I2 = 48.5%). In addition, there were no associations between cancer risk and AA vs. GG (OR = 1.72, 95% CIs: 0.50–5.94, P = 0.394, I2 = 59.4%), AA+AG (OR = 0.92, 95% CIs: 0.63–1.32, P = 0.638, I2 = 68.4%) vs. GG or A vs. G (OR = 1.02, 95% CIs: 0.64–1.62, P = 0.945, I2 = 85.5%) (Fig 7).

Bottom Line: However, the results of the studies are conflicting.In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs.Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong 528403, China.

ABSTRACT
Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important inhibitory role in anti-tumor responses, so it is considered as a powerful candidate gene for individual's genetic susceptibility to cancer. Recently, some epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. However, the results of the studies are conflicting. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed. We identified all studies reporting the relationship between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancers by electronically searches. According to the inclusion criteria and the quality assessment of Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS), only high quality studies were included. A total of twelve relevant studies involving 5,206 cases and 5,174 controls were recruited. For PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism, significantly decreased cancer risks were obtained among overall population, Asians subgroup and population-based subgroup both in TT vs. CC and TT vs. CT+CC genetic models. In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs. C allele for overall population. However, there were no significant associations between either PD-1.9 (rs2227982) or PD-1 rs7421861 polymorphisms and cancer risks in all genetic models and alleles. For PD-1.3 (rs11568821) polymorphism, we found different cancer susceptibilities between GA vs. GG and AA vs. AG+GG genetic models, and no associations between AA vs. GG, AA+AG vs. GG genetic models or A vs. G allele and cancer risks. In general, our results firstly indicated that PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism is associated a strongly decreased risk of cancers. Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus