Limits...
Programmed Cell Death-1 Polymorphisms Decrease the Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis Involving Twelve Case-Control Studies.

Dong W, Gong M, Shi Z, Xiao J, Zhang J, Peng J - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: However, the results of the studies are conflicting.In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs.Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong 528403, China.

ABSTRACT
Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important inhibitory role in anti-tumor responses, so it is considered as a powerful candidate gene for individual's genetic susceptibility to cancer. Recently, some epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. However, the results of the studies are conflicting. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed. We identified all studies reporting the relationship between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancers by electronically searches. According to the inclusion criteria and the quality assessment of Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS), only high quality studies were included. A total of twelve relevant studies involving 5,206 cases and 5,174 controls were recruited. For PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism, significantly decreased cancer risks were obtained among overall population, Asians subgroup and population-based subgroup both in TT vs. CC and TT vs. CT+CC genetic models. In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs. C allele for overall population. However, there were no significant associations between either PD-1.9 (rs2227982) or PD-1 rs7421861 polymorphisms and cancer risks in all genetic models and alleles. For PD-1.3 (rs11568821) polymorphism, we found different cancer susceptibilities between GA vs. GG and AA vs. AG+GG genetic models, and no associations between AA vs. GG, AA+AG vs. GG genetic models or A vs. G allele and cancer risks. In general, our results firstly indicated that PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism is associated a strongly decreased risk of cancers. Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plots of the PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism and cancer risk for population-based subgroup (A for TT vs. CC; B for TT vs. CT+CC; C for TT+CT vs. CC; D for TC vs. CC and E for T vs. C).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4816386&req=5

pone.0152448.g004: Forest plots of the PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism and cancer risk for population-based subgroup (A for TT vs. CC; B for TT vs. CT+CC; C for TT+CT vs. CC; D for TC vs. CC and E for T vs. C).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.

Mentions: Data from seven studies which including 3,395 cases and 2,912 controls researched about the PD-1.5 (rs2227981) were pooled together. Six of the studies were population-based and only one study was hospital-based. According to the ethnicity, six articles were researched about Asians and one study was about Caucasians. We conducted analyses for all genetic models and allele in overall group, Asians subgroup and population-based subgroup. Overall, we obtained significantly decreased cancer risks both in TT vs. CC (OR = 0.72, 95% CIs: 0.62–0.85, P = 0.000, I2 = 14.0%), TT vs. CT+CC (OR = 0.75, 95% CIs: 0.65–0.87, P = 0.000, I2 = 0.0%) genetic models and T vs. C (OR = 0.88, 95% CIs: 0.78–0.99, P = 0.04, I2 = 53.6%) allele. However, no dramatic associations were found in the other genetic models (TT+CT vs. CC: OR = 0.91, 95% CIs: 0.75–1.10, P = 0.343, I2 = 65.6%; TC vs. CC: OR = 0.97, 95% CIs: 0.78–1.19, P = 0.759, I2 = 68.2%) (Fig 2). When stratified by ethnicity, similar results were obtained in Asians subgroup. Cancer risks were remarkably reduced in TT vs. CC (OR = 0.75, 95% CIs: 0.61–0.92, P = 0.006, I2 = 24.1%) and TT vs. CT+CC (OR = 0.75, 95% CIs: 0.62–092, P = 0.005, I2 = 10.8%) genetic models. There were no significant associations in TT+CT vs. CC (OR = 0.94, 95% CIs: 0.74–1.20 P = 0.625, I2 = 69.9%), TC vs. CC (OR = 0.99, 95% CIs: 0.76–1.30, P = 0.959, I2 = 72.4%) and T vs. C (OR = 0.90, 95% CIs: 0.77–1.05, P = 0.190, I2 = 59.1%) (Fig 3). When considered the source of the control groups, we conducted analysis in population-based subgroup. Also, decreased cancer risks were found in TT vs. CC (OR = 0.71, 95% CIs: 0.61–0.84, P = 0.000, I2 = 7.5%), TT vs. CT+CC (OR = 0.74, 95% CIs: 0.64–0.86, P = 0.000, I2 = 1.9%) and T vs. C (OR = 0.84, 95% CIs: 0.78–0.91, P = 0.000, I2 = 26.5%). However, still we had observed no significant associations in TT+CT vs. CC (OR = 0.85, 95% CIs: 0.72–1.00, P = 0.054, I2 = 52.0%) and TC vs. CC (OR = 0.91, 95% CIs: 0.75–1.10, P = 0.335, I2 = 61.5%) (Fig 4).


Programmed Cell Death-1 Polymorphisms Decrease the Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis Involving Twelve Case-Control Studies.

Dong W, Gong M, Shi Z, Xiao J, Zhang J, Peng J - PLoS ONE (2016)

Forest plots of the PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism and cancer risk for population-based subgroup (A for TT vs. CC; B for TT vs. CT+CC; C for TT+CT vs. CC; D for TC vs. CC and E for T vs. C).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4816386&req=5

pone.0152448.g004: Forest plots of the PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism and cancer risk for population-based subgroup (A for TT vs. CC; B for TT vs. CT+CC; C for TT+CT vs. CC; D for TC vs. CC and E for T vs. C).The squares and horizontal lines correspond to the study-specific ORs and 95% CIs. The areas of the squares reflect the study-specific weights (which was the inverse of the variance). The diamonds represent the pooled ORs and 95% CIs.
Mentions: Data from seven studies which including 3,395 cases and 2,912 controls researched about the PD-1.5 (rs2227981) were pooled together. Six of the studies were population-based and only one study was hospital-based. According to the ethnicity, six articles were researched about Asians and one study was about Caucasians. We conducted analyses for all genetic models and allele in overall group, Asians subgroup and population-based subgroup. Overall, we obtained significantly decreased cancer risks both in TT vs. CC (OR = 0.72, 95% CIs: 0.62–0.85, P = 0.000, I2 = 14.0%), TT vs. CT+CC (OR = 0.75, 95% CIs: 0.65–0.87, P = 0.000, I2 = 0.0%) genetic models and T vs. C (OR = 0.88, 95% CIs: 0.78–0.99, P = 0.04, I2 = 53.6%) allele. However, no dramatic associations were found in the other genetic models (TT+CT vs. CC: OR = 0.91, 95% CIs: 0.75–1.10, P = 0.343, I2 = 65.6%; TC vs. CC: OR = 0.97, 95% CIs: 0.78–1.19, P = 0.759, I2 = 68.2%) (Fig 2). When stratified by ethnicity, similar results were obtained in Asians subgroup. Cancer risks were remarkably reduced in TT vs. CC (OR = 0.75, 95% CIs: 0.61–0.92, P = 0.006, I2 = 24.1%) and TT vs. CT+CC (OR = 0.75, 95% CIs: 0.62–092, P = 0.005, I2 = 10.8%) genetic models. There were no significant associations in TT+CT vs. CC (OR = 0.94, 95% CIs: 0.74–1.20 P = 0.625, I2 = 69.9%), TC vs. CC (OR = 0.99, 95% CIs: 0.76–1.30, P = 0.959, I2 = 72.4%) and T vs. C (OR = 0.90, 95% CIs: 0.77–1.05, P = 0.190, I2 = 59.1%) (Fig 3). When considered the source of the control groups, we conducted analysis in population-based subgroup. Also, decreased cancer risks were found in TT vs. CC (OR = 0.71, 95% CIs: 0.61–0.84, P = 0.000, I2 = 7.5%), TT vs. CT+CC (OR = 0.74, 95% CIs: 0.64–0.86, P = 0.000, I2 = 1.9%) and T vs. C (OR = 0.84, 95% CIs: 0.78–0.91, P = 0.000, I2 = 26.5%). However, still we had observed no significant associations in TT+CT vs. CC (OR = 0.85, 95% CIs: 0.72–1.00, P = 0.054, I2 = 52.0%) and TC vs. CC (OR = 0.91, 95% CIs: 0.75–1.10, P = 0.335, I2 = 61.5%) (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: However, the results of the studies are conflicting.In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs.Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Zhongshan Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan, Guangdong 528403, China.

ABSTRACT
Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) plays an important inhibitory role in anti-tumor responses, so it is considered as a powerful candidate gene for individual's genetic susceptibility to cancer. Recently, some epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancer risk. However, the results of the studies are conflicting. Therefore, a meta-analysis was performed. We identified all studies reporting the relationship between PD-1 polymorphisms and cancers by electronically searches. According to the inclusion criteria and the quality assessment of Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS), only high quality studies were included. A total of twelve relevant studies involving 5,206 cases and 5,174 controls were recruited. For PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism, significantly decreased cancer risks were obtained among overall population, Asians subgroup and population-based subgroup both in TT vs. CC and TT vs. CT+CC genetic models. In addition, a similar result was also found in T vs. C allele for overall population. However, there were no significant associations between either PD-1.9 (rs2227982) or PD-1 rs7421861 polymorphisms and cancer risks in all genetic models and alleles. For PD-1.3 (rs11568821) polymorphism, we found different cancer susceptibilities between GA vs. GG and AA vs. AG+GG genetic models, and no associations between AA vs. GG, AA+AG vs. GG genetic models or A vs. G allele and cancer risks. In general, our results firstly indicated that PD-1.5 (rs2227981) polymorphism is associated a strongly decreased risk of cancers. Additional epidemiological studies are needed to confirm our findings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus