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Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2013)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. pmp1@cdc.gov

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“For certain more curious and disenchanted spirits, the pleasure of ugliness comes from an even more mysterious sentiment, which is a thirst for the unknown and a taste for the horrible,” wrote Charles Baudelaire. “It is this sentiment, the germ of which all of us carry inside to a greater or lesser degree, that drives certain poets into clinics and anatomy theaters, and women to public executions. ” This taste for “ugliness” seems to also drive Jim Barsness’ exploits into the absurd and horrific, the landscape of nightmares rife with physical and moral decay... Taken to excess on the artistic canvas, ugliness and the absurd have been characterized as maximalism, a modern movement in literature and the arts that celebrates richness, decoration, sensuality, luxury, and fantasy... A genre that thrives on redundancy and overt accumulation, maximalism emphasizes a creative process or art-making that is also laborious and cumulative. “I use paper mounted on canvas because I like that sense of it being really hard to get the image ground down through all the layers of stuff... It becomes indelible. ” “The first time I did anything in art that had any profound consequences was to Draw Winky. ” That was in sixth grade at a cartoon drawing contest... He draws from eastern and western artistic traditions and taps multiple sources, from comic strips and fairy tales to Mughal miniature painting, from graffiti and medieval illuminated manuscripts to Tibetan sacred painting, from Pieter Bruegel the Elder and Hieronymus Bosch folk iconography to pop art... Expanding markets and farms bring diverse species together, facilitating exchange of microbes... The uncanny, so effectively captured in Barsness’ painting, becomes even more disquieting seen within a global context... In My Valley as in many other works, Barsness includes elements for which he offers no explanation. “I like obsessive detail…... I come from the direction that everything is significant... These linear parameters, dotted and stamped in fine print and discreetly crisscrossing the canvas, invite metaphorical interpretation... Health emergencies in the past 50 years, among them flu pandemics, anthrax attacks, and a SARS outbreak, have prompted planning and emergency response efforts within the global public health community, a seamless underlying safety network against future crises... In art, the tension generated by expansive inclusion of elements, the absurd and even ugliness and the uncanny, promotes understanding that may otherwise be lost... Likewise in public health, where an endless supply of unseen creatures, as monstrous and horrific as any found in science fiction, the art of Hieronymus Bosch, or Jim Barsness’ imagination, await the opportunity to wreak havoc... Extensive, even obsessive, public health planning is required. “More is more” takes on a new meaning as the wild, the repugnant, and the horrific, meet the banal and the fortuitous in nature.

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James Barsness (b. 1954) My Valley (2003–2005) Acrylic, ink on paper mounted on canvas (125.7 cm x 171.5 cm) Copyright courtesy of the artist and George Adams Gallery, New York
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Fa: James Barsness (b. 1954) My Valley (2003–2005) Acrylic, ink on paper mounted on canvas (125.7 cm x 171.5 cm) Copyright courtesy of the artist and George Adams Gallery, New York


More is more.

Potter P - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2013)

James Barsness (b. 1954) My Valley (2003–2005) Acrylic, ink on paper mounted on canvas (125.7 cm x 171.5 cm) Copyright courtesy of the artist and George Adams Gallery, New York
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4816380&req=5

Fa: James Barsness (b. 1954) My Valley (2003–2005) Acrylic, ink on paper mounted on canvas (125.7 cm x 171.5 cm) Copyright courtesy of the artist and George Adams Gallery, New York

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. pmp1@cdc.gov

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

“For certain more curious and disenchanted spirits, the pleasure of ugliness comes from an even more mysterious sentiment, which is a thirst for the unknown and a taste for the horrible,” wrote Charles Baudelaire. “It is this sentiment, the germ of which all of us carry inside to a greater or lesser degree, that drives certain poets into clinics and anatomy theaters, and women to public executions. ” This taste for “ugliness” seems to also drive Jim Barsness’ exploits into the absurd and horrific, the landscape of nightmares rife with physical and moral decay... Taken to excess on the artistic canvas, ugliness and the absurd have been characterized as maximalism, a modern movement in literature and the arts that celebrates richness, decoration, sensuality, luxury, and fantasy... A genre that thrives on redundancy and overt accumulation, maximalism emphasizes a creative process or art-making that is also laborious and cumulative. “I use paper mounted on canvas because I like that sense of it being really hard to get the image ground down through all the layers of stuff... It becomes indelible. ” “The first time I did anything in art that had any profound consequences was to Draw Winky. ” That was in sixth grade at a cartoon drawing contest... He draws from eastern and western artistic traditions and taps multiple sources, from comic strips and fairy tales to Mughal miniature painting, from graffiti and medieval illuminated manuscripts to Tibetan sacred painting, from Pieter Bruegel the Elder and Hieronymus Bosch folk iconography to pop art... Expanding markets and farms bring diverse species together, facilitating exchange of microbes... The uncanny, so effectively captured in Barsness’ painting, becomes even more disquieting seen within a global context... In My Valley as in many other works, Barsness includes elements for which he offers no explanation. “I like obsessive detail…... I come from the direction that everything is significant... These linear parameters, dotted and stamped in fine print and discreetly crisscrossing the canvas, invite metaphorical interpretation... Health emergencies in the past 50 years, among them flu pandemics, anthrax attacks, and a SARS outbreak, have prompted planning and emergency response efforts within the global public health community, a seamless underlying safety network against future crises... In art, the tension generated by expansive inclusion of elements, the absurd and even ugliness and the uncanny, promotes understanding that may otherwise be lost... Likewise in public health, where an endless supply of unseen creatures, as monstrous and horrific as any found in science fiction, the art of Hieronymus Bosch, or Jim Barsness’ imagination, await the opportunity to wreak havoc... Extensive, even obsessive, public health planning is required. “More is more” takes on a new meaning as the wild, the repugnant, and the horrific, meet the banal and the fortuitous in nature.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus