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Zoonotic Mycobacterium bovis-induced tuberculosis in humans.

Müller B, Dürr S, Alonso S, Hattendorf J, Laisse CJ, Parsons SD, van Helden PD, Zinsstag J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2013)

Bottom Line: In regions outside Africa included in this study, overall median proportions of zoonotic TB of ≤1.4% in connection with overall TB incidence rates ≤71/100,000 population/year suggested low incidence rates.For countries of Africa included in the study, we multiplied the observed median proportion of zoonotic TB cases of 2.8% with the continental average overall TB incidence rate of 264/100,000 population/year, which resulted in a crude estimate of 7 zoonotic TB cases/100,000 population/year.These generally low incidence rates notwithstanding, available data indicated substantial consequences of this disease for some population groups and settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. borna.mueller@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
We aimed to estimate the global occurrence of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis or M. caprae infections in humans by performing a multilingual, systematic review and analysis of relevant scientific literature of the last 2 decades. Although information from many parts of the world was not available, data from 61 countries suggested a low global disease incidence. In regions outside Africa included in this study, overall median proportions of zoonotic TB of ≤1.4% in connection with overall TB incidence rates ≤71/100,000 population/year suggested low incidence rates. For countries of Africa included in the study, we multiplied the observed median proportion of zoonotic TB cases of 2.8% with the continental average overall TB incidence rate of 264/100,000 population/year, which resulted in a crude estimate of 7 zoonotic TB cases/100,000 population/year. These generally low incidence rates notwithstanding, available data indicated substantial consequences of this disease for some population groups and settings.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) among all TB cases stratified by country: Africa. x-axis values are median proportions. Each circle represents a study with the circle diameter being proportional to the log10 of the number of isolates tested. A gray rhombus indicates that the number of samples tested was not reported or could not be inferred from the data available. The median proportion of all studies for a given country is indicated by X. Numbers on the right side of the figures indicate the number of studies included for any given country.
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Figure 3: Proportion of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) among all TB cases stratified by country: Africa. x-axis values are median proportions. Each circle represents a study with the circle diameter being proportional to the log10 of the number of isolates tested. A gray rhombus indicates that the number of samples tested was not reported or could not be inferred from the data available. The median proportion of all studies for a given country is indicated by X. Numbers on the right side of the figures indicate the number of studies included for any given country.

Mentions: Among all studies included from Africa, a median of 2.8% (range 0%–37.7%) of all TB cases in humans were caused by M. bovis (Figure 2). In 10 of the 13 countries in Africa included in this study, median proportions of TB caused by M. bovis were below 3.5% and in 5 of these countries no cases were detected (Table 2; Figure 3). In contrast, for Ethiopia, Nigeria and Tanzania, respectively, the median proportion of TB cases caused by M. bovis was 17.0% (range: 16.7%–31.4%) (13–15), 15.4% (1 study available) (16) and 26.1% (range 10.8%–37.7%) (17–19). Percentages of ≈30% were reported in 4 regionally based studies in Tanzania and Ethiopia (Figure 3, Table 2) (13,17). However, many of these studies showed a low sample size, resulting in a high statistical error (Table 2). The lack of large-scale, population-based data did not allow for an identification of specific risk groups associated with M. bovis infections.


Zoonotic Mycobacterium bovis-induced tuberculosis in humans.

Müller B, Dürr S, Alonso S, Hattendorf J, Laisse CJ, Parsons SD, van Helden PD, Zinsstag J - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2013)

Proportion of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) among all TB cases stratified by country: Africa. x-axis values are median proportions. Each circle represents a study with the circle diameter being proportional to the log10 of the number of isolates tested. A gray rhombus indicates that the number of samples tested was not reported or could not be inferred from the data available. The median proportion of all studies for a given country is indicated by X. Numbers on the right side of the figures indicate the number of studies included for any given country.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4816377&req=5

Figure 3: Proportion of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) among all TB cases stratified by country: Africa. x-axis values are median proportions. Each circle represents a study with the circle diameter being proportional to the log10 of the number of isolates tested. A gray rhombus indicates that the number of samples tested was not reported or could not be inferred from the data available. The median proportion of all studies for a given country is indicated by X. Numbers on the right side of the figures indicate the number of studies included for any given country.
Mentions: Among all studies included from Africa, a median of 2.8% (range 0%–37.7%) of all TB cases in humans were caused by M. bovis (Figure 2). In 10 of the 13 countries in Africa included in this study, median proportions of TB caused by M. bovis were below 3.5% and in 5 of these countries no cases were detected (Table 2; Figure 3). In contrast, for Ethiopia, Nigeria and Tanzania, respectively, the median proportion of TB cases caused by M. bovis was 17.0% (range: 16.7%–31.4%) (13–15), 15.4% (1 study available) (16) and 26.1% (range 10.8%–37.7%) (17–19). Percentages of ≈30% were reported in 4 regionally based studies in Tanzania and Ethiopia (Figure 3, Table 2) (13,17). However, many of these studies showed a low sample size, resulting in a high statistical error (Table 2). The lack of large-scale, population-based data did not allow for an identification of specific risk groups associated with M. bovis infections.

Bottom Line: In regions outside Africa included in this study, overall median proportions of zoonotic TB of ≤1.4% in connection with overall TB incidence rates ≤71/100,000 population/year suggested low incidence rates.For countries of Africa included in the study, we multiplied the observed median proportion of zoonotic TB cases of 2.8% with the continental average overall TB incidence rate of 264/100,000 population/year, which resulted in a crude estimate of 7 zoonotic TB cases/100,000 population/year.These generally low incidence rates notwithstanding, available data indicated substantial consequences of this disease for some population groups and settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa. borna.mueller@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
We aimed to estimate the global occurrence of zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis or M. caprae infections in humans by performing a multilingual, systematic review and analysis of relevant scientific literature of the last 2 decades. Although information from many parts of the world was not available, data from 61 countries suggested a low global disease incidence. In regions outside Africa included in this study, overall median proportions of zoonotic TB of ≤1.4% in connection with overall TB incidence rates ≤71/100,000 population/year suggested low incidence rates. For countries of Africa included in the study, we multiplied the observed median proportion of zoonotic TB cases of 2.8% with the continental average overall TB incidence rate of 264/100,000 population/year, which resulted in a crude estimate of 7 zoonotic TB cases/100,000 population/year. These generally low incidence rates notwithstanding, available data indicated substantial consequences of this disease for some population groups and settings.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus