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Preference for Safe Over Risky Options in Binge Eating.

Neveu R, Fouragnan E, Barsumian F, Carrier E, Lai M, Nicolas A, Neveu D, Coricelli G - Front Behav Neurosci (2016)

Bottom Line: In the BART, ANB patients exhibited a higher variability in their choices in the food compared to neutral condition.This higher variability was associated with higher difficulties to discard irrelevant information.All these results suggest that decision-making under risk and under uncertainty is not fundamentally altered in all these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS, Université de LyonLyon, France; Praxis, Ville-la-GrandFrance.

ABSTRACT
Binge eating has been usually viewed as a loss of control and an impulsive behavior. But, little is known about the actual behavior of binging patients (prevalently women) in terms of basic decision-making under risk or under uncertainty. In healthy women, stressful cues bias behavior for safer options, raising the question of whether food cues that are perceived as threatening by binging patients may modulate patients' behaviors towards safer options. A cross-sectional study was conducted with binging patients (20 bulimia nervosa (BN) and 23 anorexia nervosa binging (ANB) patients) and two control groups (22 non-binging restrictive (ANR) anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy participants), without any concomitant impulsive disorder. We assessed decisions under risk with a gambling task with known probabilities and decisions under uncertainty with the balloon analog risk taking task (BART) with unknown probabilities of winning, in three cued-conditions including neutral, binge food and stressful cues. In the gambling task, binging and ANR patients adopted similar safer attitudes and coherently elicited a higher aversion to losses when primed by food as compared to neutral cues. This held true for BN and ANR patients in the BART. After controlling for anxiety level, these safer attitudes in the food condition were similar to the ones under stress. In the BART, ANB patients exhibited a higher variability in their choices in the food compared to neutral condition. This higher variability was associated with higher difficulties to discard irrelevant information. All these results suggest that decision-making under risk and under uncertainty is not fundamentally altered in all these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trial design in the balloon analog risk taking (BART) and gambling tasks (A), rate of balloons saved (in %) in BART and average number of pumps per balloon saved in BART (B), rate of choices of the gamble when the probability to win the gamble is 50% in the gambling task (C). Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive (ANR) are ANR subtype patients, anorexia nervosa binging (ANB) are ANB subtype patients, bulimia nervosa (BN) are BN patients and controls are healthy participants. Mean and standard errors of the mean are reported. Note: In the BART, participants have to choose between inflating one more time the balloon or saving it. The response event is repeated until balloon explosion or participant’s choice to save the balloon. A sequence corresponds to all participants choices from the first display of a balloon until its saving or its explosion. In the gambling task, participants have to choose between one of the two options.
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Figure 1: Trial design in the balloon analog risk taking (BART) and gambling tasks (A), rate of balloons saved (in %) in BART and average number of pumps per balloon saved in BART (B), rate of choices of the gamble when the probability to win the gamble is 50% in the gambling task (C). Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive (ANR) are ANR subtype patients, anorexia nervosa binging (ANB) are ANB subtype patients, bulimia nervosa (BN) are BN patients and controls are healthy participants. Mean and standard errors of the mean are reported. Note: In the BART, participants have to choose between inflating one more time the balloon or saving it. The response event is repeated until balloon explosion or participant’s choice to save the balloon. A sequence corresponds to all participants choices from the first display of a balloon until its saving or its explosion. In the gambling task, participants have to choose between one of the two options.

Mentions: All participants performed a monetary gambling task and the balloon analog risk taking (BART) task (Lejuez et al., 2002; Figure 1A) in computerized protocols using Presentation (NeuroBehavioral Systems, release 14.2, Albany, CA, USA). The gambling task captures decision-making under risk whereas the BART captures decision making under uncertainty (Brand et al., 2006). These two tasks complemented the assessment of other cognitive control abilities for which results are reported elsewhere (Neveu et al., 2014). At the beginning of each of the two tasks, participants were trained over five trials at the gambling task and two balloons sequences at the BART to get used to the response buttons.


Preference for Safe Over Risky Options in Binge Eating.

Neveu R, Fouragnan E, Barsumian F, Carrier E, Lai M, Nicolas A, Neveu D, Coricelli G - Front Behav Neurosci (2016)

Trial design in the balloon analog risk taking (BART) and gambling tasks (A), rate of balloons saved (in %) in BART and average number of pumps per balloon saved in BART (B), rate of choices of the gamble when the probability to win the gamble is 50% in the gambling task (C). Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive (ANR) are ANR subtype patients, anorexia nervosa binging (ANB) are ANB subtype patients, bulimia nervosa (BN) are BN patients and controls are healthy participants. Mean and standard errors of the mean are reported. Note: In the BART, participants have to choose between inflating one more time the balloon or saving it. The response event is repeated until balloon explosion or participant’s choice to save the balloon. A sequence corresponds to all participants choices from the first display of a balloon until its saving or its explosion. In the gambling task, participants have to choose between one of the two options.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4815053&req=5

Figure 1: Trial design in the balloon analog risk taking (BART) and gambling tasks (A), rate of balloons saved (in %) in BART and average number of pumps per balloon saved in BART (B), rate of choices of the gamble when the probability to win the gamble is 50% in the gambling task (C). Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive (ANR) are ANR subtype patients, anorexia nervosa binging (ANB) are ANB subtype patients, bulimia nervosa (BN) are BN patients and controls are healthy participants. Mean and standard errors of the mean are reported. Note: In the BART, participants have to choose between inflating one more time the balloon or saving it. The response event is repeated until balloon explosion or participant’s choice to save the balloon. A sequence corresponds to all participants choices from the first display of a balloon until its saving or its explosion. In the gambling task, participants have to choose between one of the two options.
Mentions: All participants performed a monetary gambling task and the balloon analog risk taking (BART) task (Lejuez et al., 2002; Figure 1A) in computerized protocols using Presentation (NeuroBehavioral Systems, release 14.2, Albany, CA, USA). The gambling task captures decision-making under risk whereas the BART captures decision making under uncertainty (Brand et al., 2006). These two tasks complemented the assessment of other cognitive control abilities for which results are reported elsewhere (Neveu et al., 2014). At the beginning of each of the two tasks, participants were trained over five trials at the gambling task and two balloons sequences at the BART to get used to the response buttons.

Bottom Line: In the BART, ANB patients exhibited a higher variability in their choices in the food compared to neutral condition.This higher variability was associated with higher difficulties to discard irrelevant information.All these results suggest that decision-making under risk and under uncertainty is not fundamentally altered in all these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuroscience Research Center, CNRS, Université de LyonLyon, France; Praxis, Ville-la-GrandFrance.

ABSTRACT
Binge eating has been usually viewed as a loss of control and an impulsive behavior. But, little is known about the actual behavior of binging patients (prevalently women) in terms of basic decision-making under risk or under uncertainty. In healthy women, stressful cues bias behavior for safer options, raising the question of whether food cues that are perceived as threatening by binging patients may modulate patients' behaviors towards safer options. A cross-sectional study was conducted with binging patients (20 bulimia nervosa (BN) and 23 anorexia nervosa binging (ANB) patients) and two control groups (22 non-binging restrictive (ANR) anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy participants), without any concomitant impulsive disorder. We assessed decisions under risk with a gambling task with known probabilities and decisions under uncertainty with the balloon analog risk taking task (BART) with unknown probabilities of winning, in three cued-conditions including neutral, binge food and stressful cues. In the gambling task, binging and ANR patients adopted similar safer attitudes and coherently elicited a higher aversion to losses when primed by food as compared to neutral cues. This held true for BN and ANR patients in the BART. After controlling for anxiety level, these safer attitudes in the food condition were similar to the ones under stress. In the BART, ANB patients exhibited a higher variability in their choices in the food compared to neutral condition. This higher variability was associated with higher difficulties to discard irrelevant information. All these results suggest that decision-making under risk and under uncertainty is not fundamentally altered in all these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus