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Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental and numerical demonstration of acoustic microstreaming.(a) An optical image of acoustic microstreaming in the x-y plane during microbubble oscillation at a driving frequency of 24 kHz and voltage of 10 Vpp. (b) A simulation of microstreaming from the x-y plane (top view) of the microbubble. (c) An optical image of out-of-plane (perpendicular to the x-y plane) microstreaming during microbubble oscillation at 25.5 kHz and 15 Vpp. (d) 3D sketch demonstrating in-plane (marked in red) and out-of-plane (marked in blue) acoustic microstreaming vortices at frequency f1 and f2, respectively. (e) A graphic simulation illustrating microstreaming in the y-z plane (side view) of an asymmetric microbubble. Scale bars=30 μm. In both b and e, the arrows indicate the direction of the streaming velocity, while the colour plot shows the magnitude of the streaming velocity ranging from white (min) to black (max).
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f2: Experimental and numerical demonstration of acoustic microstreaming.(a) An optical image of acoustic microstreaming in the x-y plane during microbubble oscillation at a driving frequency of 24 kHz and voltage of 10 Vpp. (b) A simulation of microstreaming from the x-y plane (top view) of the microbubble. (c) An optical image of out-of-plane (perpendicular to the x-y plane) microstreaming during microbubble oscillation at 25.5 kHz and 15 Vpp. (d) 3D sketch demonstrating in-plane (marked in red) and out-of-plane (marked in blue) acoustic microstreaming vortices at frequency f1 and f2, respectively. (e) A graphic simulation illustrating microstreaming in the y-z plane (side view) of an asymmetric microbubble. Scale bars=30 μm. In both b and e, the arrows indicate the direction of the streaming velocity, while the colour plot shows the magnitude of the streaming velocity ranging from white (min) to black (max).

Mentions: The device setup (Fig. 1a) includes a PDMS-based single layer microfluidic channel and a piezoelectric transducer. The channel contains linear arrays of rectangular microcavities (Fig. 1b) that trap air microbubbles when the liquid is injected. A piezoelectric transducer mounted on a glass slide adjacent to the channel generates acoustic waves. When the trapped microbubble is exposed to an acoustic field with a wavelength much larger than microbubble diameters, oscillations are created, which, in turn, generate acoustic microstreaming47 (Fig. 2a).


Rotational manipulation of single cells and organisms using acoustic waves
Experimental and numerical demonstration of acoustic microstreaming.(a) An optical image of acoustic microstreaming in the x-y plane during microbubble oscillation at a driving frequency of 24 kHz and voltage of 10 Vpp. (b) A simulation of microstreaming from the x-y plane (top view) of the microbubble. (c) An optical image of out-of-plane (perpendicular to the x-y plane) microstreaming during microbubble oscillation at 25.5 kHz and 15 Vpp. (d) 3D sketch demonstrating in-plane (marked in red) and out-of-plane (marked in blue) acoustic microstreaming vortices at frequency f1 and f2, respectively. (e) A graphic simulation illustrating microstreaming in the y-z plane (side view) of an asymmetric microbubble. Scale bars=30 μm. In both b and e, the arrows indicate the direction of the streaming velocity, while the colour plot shows the magnitude of the streaming velocity ranging from white (min) to black (max).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4814581&req=5

f2: Experimental and numerical demonstration of acoustic microstreaming.(a) An optical image of acoustic microstreaming in the x-y plane during microbubble oscillation at a driving frequency of 24 kHz and voltage of 10 Vpp. (b) A simulation of microstreaming from the x-y plane (top view) of the microbubble. (c) An optical image of out-of-plane (perpendicular to the x-y plane) microstreaming during microbubble oscillation at 25.5 kHz and 15 Vpp. (d) 3D sketch demonstrating in-plane (marked in red) and out-of-plane (marked in blue) acoustic microstreaming vortices at frequency f1 and f2, respectively. (e) A graphic simulation illustrating microstreaming in the y-z plane (side view) of an asymmetric microbubble. Scale bars=30 μm. In both b and e, the arrows indicate the direction of the streaming velocity, while the colour plot shows the magnitude of the streaming velocity ranging from white (min) to black (max).
Mentions: The device setup (Fig. 1a) includes a PDMS-based single layer microfluidic channel and a piezoelectric transducer. The channel contains linear arrays of rectangular microcavities (Fig. 1b) that trap air microbubbles when the liquid is injected. A piezoelectric transducer mounted on a glass slide adjacent to the channel generates acoustic waves. When the trapped microbubble is exposed to an acoustic field with a wavelength much larger than microbubble diameters, oscillations are created, which, in turn, generate acoustic microstreaming47 (Fig. 2a).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

The precise rotational manipulation of single cells or organisms is invaluable to many applications in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine. In this article, we describe an acoustic-based, on-chip manipulation method that can rotate single microparticles, cells and organisms. To achieve this, we trapped microbubbles within predefined sidewall microcavities inside a microchannel. In an acoustic field, trapped microbubbles were driven into oscillatory motion generating steady microvortices which were utilized to precisely rotate colloids, cells and entire organisms (that is, C. elegans). We have tested the capabilities of our method by analysing reproductive system pathologies and nervous system morphology in C. elegans. Using our device, we revealed the underlying abnormal cell fusion causing defective vulval morphology in mutant worms. Our acoustofluidic rotational manipulation (ARM) technique is an easy-to-use, compact, and biocompatible method, permitting rotation regardless of optical, magnetic or electrical properties of the sample under investigation.

No MeSH data available.